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News and updates about medical 3D-printing

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Will 3D printed organs-on-chips replace animal testing?

Harvard University researchers have 3D printed the first organ-on-a-chip with integrated sensors. This new technology could revolutionize the biomedical research field, which has relied on expensive and time-consuming animal studies and cell cultures for decades. Organs-on-chips, or microphysiological systems (MPS), are microchips that recapitulate the microarchitecture and functions of living human organs in vitro. The Wyss Institute at Harvard University explains MPS as follows: “Each in

Els

Els

 

Cardiologists use 3D printed heart to treat arrhythmia

Cardiologists in Aalst, Belgium, 3D printed the hearts of two patients for preprocedural planning in the treatment of arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat). There are different types of arrhythmia and treatment thereof varies. Some conditions don’t require any treatment, while others call for medication or surgical procedures. One minimally invasive procedure is catheter ablation. During this procedure, a catheter delivers high-frequency electrical energy to a small area of tissue inside the hea

Els

Els

 

3D-printed brace brings comfort and elegance for scoliosis patients

Last week, 3D Systems announced the successful completion of its pilot program for a 3D-printed brace for children and young adults with scoliosis (curved spine). As with other 3D-printed braces, the “Bespoke Brace” is personalized for each patient. In a first step, the patient is fitted with a prototype brace. Once this prototype has been customized, it is digitized to create a digital reference underlay. Next, the brace is further adjusted digitally and finally 3D-printed using selective laser

Els

Els

 

3D-printed ankle brace: a broader application of medical 3D-printing

We have seen some interesting articles and posts on the amazing things 3D-printing can do for rare medical conditions. But have you, like me, been wondering how this promising technology can benefit you, personally? How it can benefit lots of people, rather than just a few with serious medical conditions? Here is an example: you can have an ankle brace 3D-printed that fits your ankle perfectly! Significantly reduce the risk of a sprained ankle when running, playing soccer, volleyball, basketball

Els

Els

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