Jump to content
  • Welcome to embodi3D Downloads! This is the largest and fastest growing library of 3D printable medical models generated from real medical scans on the Internet. A unique scientific resource, most of the material is free. Registered members can download, upload, and sell models. To convert your own medical scans to a 3D model, take a look at democratiz3D, our free and automated conversion service.

Miscellaneous

Sign in to follow this  

Sub Category  

Miscellaneous category of 3D printing files.

14 files

  1. Free

    ANT - stl file processed

    ANT - stl file processed

    0 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    0 comments

    Updated

  2. Free

    Head and Neck CT DICOM dataset for teaching

    This is an anonymized CT scan DICOM dataset to be used  for teaching on how to create a 3D printable models.

    193 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    1 comment

    Updated

  3. Free

    CT scan DICOM files for instructables tutorial

    These are the DICOM CT scan files for the instructables tutorial for creating a 3D printable model. Download the zipped folder and unzip it. You will add the entire directory to Slicer to start the process. Also included is the intermediary NRRD file for use with the democratiz3D file conversion service. You must be logged into your free embodi3d account to download. To register, click here.

    381 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    0 comments

    Submitted

  4. Free

    Test barrel - processed

    Test barrel - processed

    1 download

       (0 reviews)

    0 comments

    Updated

  5. Free

    File for tutorial: How to Create Hollow Shell with MeshMixer

    This file accompanies the tutorial "How to Create a Hollow Shell from a Medical STL Model using MeshMixer." Download the file to follow along with the tutorial.

    64 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    0 comments

    Submitted

  6. Free

    File Pack for Tutorial: Creating 3D Printable Medical Models Using Free Service at Embodi3D.com and Free Software 3D Slicer and MeshMixer

    File pack to accompany the tutorial listed above. Download this file pack to follow along with the tutorial. View the full tutorial here.
     

    494 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    2 comments

    Updated

  7. Free

    File Pack for Muscle and Skin STL Creation tutorial

    This file pack accompanies the tutorial on Creating 3D printable muscle and skin STL files from medical CT scans. You must register for a free account to download.
     
    Read the full tutorial
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3qPgmVSdSkg

    238 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    0 comments

    Updated

  8. Free

    Diabetic Foot Infection with Ulcer: STL Files For 3D Printing Model

    Diabetes describes a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood sugar, either because insulin production is inadequate, or because the body's cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both.
    Worldwide there are over 400 million people with diabetes. Diabetes disrupts the vascular system, affecting many areas of the body such as the eyes, kidneys, legs, and feet. Diabetes often leads to peripheral vascular disease that inhibits a person's blood circulation. With this condition, there is a narrowing of the arteries that frequently leads to significantly decreased circulation in the lower part of the legs and the feet. Poor circulation contributes to diabetic foot problems by reducing the amount of oxygen and nutrition supplied to the skin and other tissue, causing injuries to heal poorly. Preventing foot complications is more critical for the diabetic patient because poor circulation impairs the healing process and can lead to ulcers, infection, and other serious foot conditions.
     

     
    There are three STL files available for download and 3D bioprinting. One STL file for bioprinting the foot, one for the soft tissue and the third STL file is for the ischemic foot ulcer. All three files have been zipped to reduce file size. You will need to unzip the files once you have downloaded them.These files are distributed under the Creative Commons license Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs. Please respect the terms of the licensing agreement.
     
    The models are provided for distribution on embodi3D.com with the permission of the creators Dr. Beth Ripley and Dr. Tatiana. These models are part of the Top 10 Killers 3D printable disease library. James Weaver and Ahmed Hosny also contributed to the project. We thank everyone involved for their contributions to embodi3d.com and their advocacy for better health and education through 3D printing.

    52 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    0 comments

    Submitted

  9. Free

    Chest Wall Tumor STL Files for 3D Printing

    Chest wall tumors are benign or malignant tumors that can interfere with pulmonary function. Primary chest wall tumors account for 5% of all thoracic tumors and 1 to 2% of all primary tumors. Patients with chest wall tumors require chest x-ray, CT, MRI, and sometimes PET–CT to determine the original site and extent of the tumor and whether it is a primary chest wall tumor or a metastasis. Biopsy and histologic evaluation confirm the diagnosis. Prognosis varies by cancer type, cell differentiation, and stage. Sarcomas have been the most well studied, and primary chest wall sarcomas have a reported 5-yr survival of 17%.
     

     
    The models are provided for distribution on embodi3D.com with the permission of the creators Dr. Beth Ripley and Dr. Tatiana. These models are part of the Top 10 Killers 3D printable disease library. James Weaver and Ahmed Hosny also contributed to the project. We thank everyone involved for their contributions to embodi3d.com and their advocacy for better health and education through 3D printing.
     
    There are two STL files available for download and 3D bioprinting. One STL file for printing the chest wall mass and the other STL is for bioprinting the ribs. The files have been zipped to save space and speed up downloads. These files are distributed under the Creative Commons license Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs. Please respect the terms of the licensing agreement.

    70 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    0 comments

    Submitted

  10. Free

    STL Files for 3D Printable Model of Breast Cancer

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women and one in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime. Each year it is estimated that over 230,000 women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer and more than 40,000 will die. It is the second leading cause of death from cancer in women (lung cancer is the leading cause). Over 2.9 million breast cancer survivors are alive in the United States today. These STL files allow you to 3D print a whole breast with the mass within the breast and another model of just the mass.
     

     
    The models are provided for distribution on embodi3D.com with the permission of the creators Dr. Beth Ripley and Dr. Tatiana. These models are part of the Top 10 Killers 3D printable disease library. James Weaver and Ahmed Hosny also contributed to the project. We thank everyone involved for their contributions to embodi3d.com and their advocacy for better health and education through 3D printing.
     
    There are two STL files available for download and 3D bioprinting. One STL file for printing the breast including the cancerous mass and the other STL is for printing the mass. Both files have been zipped to reduce the file size. You will need to unzip the files once you have downloaded them.These files are distributed under the Creative Commons license Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs. Please respect the terms of the licensing agreement.
     
    Both files are verified as watertight (manifold) and 3D printable.

    182 downloads

       (1 review)

    1 comment

    Updated

  11. Free

    Orthopedic lumbar spine fusion hardware, transpedicular screws and fixation rods

    This 3D printable lumbar fusion orthopedic hardware was generated from real CT scan data and is thus anatomically accurate as it comes from a real person. It shows 4 levels of transpedicular screws with joining rods. The screws are secured to each lumbar spinal vertebra by drilling into the posterior pedicles. Download is free for registered members.
    This file was originally created by Dr. Bruno Gobbato, who has graciously given permission to share it here on Embodi3D. Modifications were made by Dr. Mike to make it suitable for 3D printing.
    The file(s) are distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license. It can't be used for commercial purposes. If you would like to use it for commercial purposes, please contact the authors.
    Technical specs:
    File format: STL
    Manifold mesh: Yes
    Triangles: 41186

    35 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    0 comments

    Submitted

  12. Free

    Tutorial file pack

    File pack to accompany the tutorial: "3D Printing of Bones from CT Scans: A Tutorial on Quickly Correcting Extensive Mesh Errors using Blender and MeshMixer"

    488 downloads

       (4 reviews)

    0 comments

    Updated

  13. Free

    Files to accompany tutorial on Advanced Mesh Cleaning with Blender

    These are Blender and STL files to accompany the tutorial Preparing CT scans for 3D printing. Cleaning and repairing STL file mesh from bones using Blender, an advanced tutorial. Files are in ZIP format. Download and follow along.

    123 downloads

       (1 review)

    0 comments

    Updated

  14. Free

    Print Optimized Small Fluid Test Flask

    Part Details:
    This is a miscellaneous, editable part that can be printed and consists of purely triagonal and quad faces throughout the file for printing here.

    This model can be freely derived and using any editing methods for both commercial and non-commercial purposes with standard attribution to source of data.
    This miscellaneous part is kept simple for easy file editing, part revision and easy printing. The model does however have areas where edges fall-off at 90-degrees so plan print tests accordingly.
    Proposed uses:

    The advantages would be ability to custom material and dimensions to application. This file would be a simple prototype for any number of permutations of flask elements for use in the biology research setting.

    Software/methods used:
    This model was prepared using Blender 2.71.
    Attachments:
    001-003.jpg are measurement specifications for the device
    004.jpg is estimated cost to print using materials from Shapeways.com

    7 downloads

       (2 reviews)

    1 comment

    Updated

Sign in to follow this  
  • File Reviews

    • By Andrew Forsberg · Posted
      Nice file. What is the scaling factor to create a accurately sized adult heart?
    • By Dawnmferguson · Posted
      Excellent model! I ended up printing it on a less than awesome Dremel 3D printer, then made a silicone mold off of it so I could make wax crayons. I split the mesh in Fusion 360 so I could make a 2 part mold, but ended up only pouring into each side. Still great!!
    • By jvonachen · Posted
      It looks great in the pictures but I did not bother printing it because it would have generated a ton of support material which I try to minimize.  I was looking more for just a single seamless skull with minimal support.  Perhaps one in two parts and hollow.  I'll keep looking.
    • By shadowwynd · Posted
      Good model; prints in one piece (no moving joints or removable parts).  Needed it for an art project.
    • By yf2233 · Posted
      Really nice heart model, you can see the veins. Part of the model broke when I was removing support material. This was printed along with other 3D anatomy files form this site on our Stratasys printer in the lab  Thank you!!
  • File Comments

  • Recent Forum Posts

    • Hi all,

      My first attempt at creating a bone print of dog radius ulna using the fantastic Embodi3D procedure .  

      I see there is too much filling in of space between between and around antebrachial bones  -  this is not evident on the original CT.  Can I tweak settings to better isolate radius and ulna ?  I see beautifully isolated examples on this site and feel I am missing a trick here!  

      One point - our CT is cone beam - does that make any difference to stl creation ?

      Any advice much appreciated.

      Martin
    • Medical 3D printing isn't at a point where a user can buy a printer, plug it in and do a few prints a year. There is a big learning curve a user must go through in order for prints to turn out correctly. This is especially true for medical trial exhibits where certain anatomy or conditions need to be highlighted from a CT scan. This requires 3D printing expertise and medical training.   Furthermore, you will need space and all the related tools that go with 3D printing. Some printer manufacturers show their printers sitting on an office desk. This really isn't practical because of the noise, heat and messy post print processing.   We offer a 3D printing service specifically for medical trial exhibits: https://www.embodi3d.com/3d-printing-anatomy-models-for-medical-malpractice-trial-exhibits/    
    • Here is a small sample, you can compare opening in slicer vs opening in mimics. I feel like it has something to do with it being 16 bit but mimics should be able to detect that. Any ideas? WitmerLab_Crocodylus-porosus-OUVC10899_prescan0617.dcm
    • Hey, I have looked through the forums a bit, and there are some instructions and recommendations about specific printers, but I was hoping one (or more) of you guys could comment on what printer/model might be best for me.     I work in a law firm, and recently we've been toying with the idea of printing models of some of our client's scans.   Not an everyday thing, and price and relative ease of use would be important.    So: Relatively easy printer to use Decently supported Limited use (not everyday printing, probably 4-6 big prints a year only) Price may be important   Any ideas on printers and models?    
    • Can you upload the data and post the link here? 
×