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Found 38 results

  1. asdada

    asdada

    Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    file, axial, dicom, MRI, pelvis, gluteus, hip, urinary, bladder colon, descendent, rectum, sigmoid, thigh, lower, limb, quadriceps, vastus, pubis, ischium, ilium,

    Free

  2. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    Shannon Li - processed, skin, abdomen, pelvis, rectum, wall, gluteus, thigh, hip, genitalia, back, 3d, model, printable, .stl,

    Free

  3. Version 1.0.0

    2 downloads

    abdominal muscles - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. abdominal, .stl, 3d, model, printable, muscles, anterior, oblique, interior, pelvis, hip, gluteus, inguinal, genital, dorsal, lumbar, spine, thigh

    Free

  4. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    602 - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. muscles, 3d, model, .stl, printable, rectum, oblique, external, lumbar, abdominal, abdomen, gluteus, spine, hip, pelvis, thigh muscles, quadriceps

    Free

  5. Version 1.0.0

    2 downloads

    nov tissue - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. whole, body, .stl, 3d, model, printable, muscle, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital, mandible, chest, thorax, upper, limb, shoulder, abdomen, quadriceps, lower,thigh, knee, gluteus, neck, back,

    Free

  6. Version 1.0.0

    10 downloads

    ct, scan, without, contrast, .stl, 3d, model, printable, thigh, lower, limb, femoral, quadriceps, vastus, medialis, lateralis, knee, condyle, patella, urinary, bladder, hip, trochanter, femur,

    Free

  7. Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    1, ct, scan, without, contrast, .stl, 3d, model, printable, thigh, lower, limb, femoral, quadriceps, vastus, medialis, lateralis, knee, condyle, patella, urinary, bladder, hip, trochanter, femur,

    Free

  8. Version 1.0.0

    5 downloads

    vlow thresh, axial, ct, scan, without, contrast, whole, body, thorax, chest, neck, lung, ribs, bone, dorsal, spine, .stl, printable, mediastinum, lumbar, spinous, abdomen, liver, spleen, diaphragm, psoas, muscles, kidney, gastric, small, bowel, colon, transverse, sigmoid, rectum, gallbladder, urinary, bladder, thigh, quadriceps, femur, knee, condyle, tibia, fibula, scapula, clavicle, 3d, model,

    Free

  9. Version 1.0.0

    2 downloads

    skin - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. whole, body, skin, head, neck, thorax chest, abdomen, upper, lower, limbs, elbow, shoulder, back, thigh, knee, ankle, hip, pelvis, 3d, model, .stl, printable,

    Free

  10. Version 1.0.0

    7 downloads

    testing vascular democratiz, axial, ct, scan, thorax, chest, heart, .stl, ribs, lung, 3d, model, printable, with, contrast, whole, body, diaphragm, stomach, spleen, liver, pancreas, colon, small, bowel, kidneys, psoas, muscles, pelvis, hip, acetabulum, spine, ischium, pubis, ilium, neck, bone, ventricle, septum, auricle, thigh, rectum, gluteus, aorta, celiac, trunk, mesenteric, superior, perineum

    Free

  11. SFMJM

    Chest

    Version 1.0.0

    6 downloads

    Chest and Legs, ct, scan, with, contrast, 3d, model, .stl, printable, ventricle, auricle, heart, liver, spleen, pancreas, lung, bronchi, quadriceps, thigh, femur, perineum, ischium, iliac, pubis, ribs, bone, colon, descendent, ascendent, rectum, superficial,

    Free

  12. SFMJM

    Chest

    Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    Routine chest CT, axial, ct, scan, with, contrast, arterial, abdomen, pelvis, aorta, chest, whole, body, lung, mediastinum, cardiac, ventricle, auricle, septum, muscle, upper, limb, bone, ribs, dorsal, spine, lumbar, transverse, spinous, psoas, lower, thigh, quadriceps, bronchi,

    Free

  13. Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    thumb brace - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. lower, limb, stl, 3d, model, skin, knee, thigh, leg

    Free

  14. Version 1.0.0

    4 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file contains a model of the muscles of the thigh and knee of a 64 year old man was derived from a real medical CT scan. This model was created using the democratiz3D 3D model creation service STS006

    Free

  15. Version 1.0.0

    5 downloads

    This 3D model represents a case of low grade myxoid liposarcoma affecting the right thigh muscle of a 46 years old male. The model shows a comparison of both lower limbs muscle with a notable enlargement / swelling of the right thigh muscles. The tumor is not causing a significant muscular deformity, therefor a cross sectional CT image is attached showing the lesion in axial, coronal and sagittal planes. Myxoid liposarcoma is the second commonest for of liposarcoma and usually represents an intermediate grade. Liposarcomas in general are mostly seen in extremities and the most common affected muscles are of the thigh. This 3D model was created from the file STS_044. The source scan can be found here.

    Free

  16. Version 1.0.0

    9 downloads

    This 3D model represents a case of high grade extraskeletal osteosarcoma affecting the left adductor muscle of a 27 years old male. The patient was treated by surgical excision follower by chemotherapy. A cross sectional CT image is attached showing the lesion in axial, coronal and sagittal planes. Extraskeletal osteosarcoma (ESOS) is one of the rare malignant neoplasms that affects the mesenchymal tissues such as the retroperitoneum as well as the soft tissue of the extremities with no significant connection to the related bones. Extraskeletal osteosarcoma usually affects people between 40 years and 80 years and is more common in males with a documented risk factor which is radiation exposure. The common presentation is enlarged or swollen soft tissue which could be painful or not. Extraskeletal osteosarcoma is diagnosed by plain x-ray, CT or MRI as the soft tissue shows variable calcification. The most common affected sites are the lower extremities followed by upper extremities and retroperitoneum. Most of patients are presented with metastasis at time of diagnosis which leads to a generally poor prognosis. The usual treatment is surgical excision of the primary tumor as the tumor is insensitive to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. This 3D model was created from the file STS_045. The source scan can be found here.

    Free

  17. Version 1.0.0

    7 downloads

    This 3D model represents a case of high grade Extraskeletal osteosarcoma affecting the left adductor muscle of a 27 years old male. The patient was treated by surgical excision follower by chemotherapy. Extraskeletal osteosarcoma (ESOS) is one of the rare malignant neoplasms that affects the mesenchymal tissues such as the retroperitoneum as well as the soft tissue of the extremities with no significant connection to the related bones. Extraskeletal osteosarcoma usually affects people between 40 years and 80 years and is more common in males with a documented risk factor which is radiation exposure. The common presentation is enlarged or swollen soft tissue which could be painful or not. Extraskeletal osteosarcoma is diagnosed by plain x-ray, CT or MRI as the soft tissue shows variable calcification. The most common affect sites are the lower extremities followed by upper extremities and retroperitoneum. Most of patients are presented with metastasis at time of diagnosis which leads to a generally poor prognosis. The usual treatment is surgical excision of the primary tumor as the tumor is insensitive to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. A model created from this scan can be found here.

    Free

  18. Version 1.0.0

    2 downloads

    This model is the bilateral thigh muscle rendering of a 65-year-old male with left thigh myxoid fibrosarcoma. At the time of diagnosis, the patient had metastases to his lungs. The patient therefore underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy and was found to have an intermediate grade lesion at the time of diagnosis. The patient unfortunately died 9.5 months after diagnosis. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. Myxoid fibrosarcoma (or myxoid MFH) is the most common subtype of MFH, at about 10%-20% of cases. Clinically, the tumor presents as a deep, slow-growing, painless mass. It is located more commonly in the lower extremities and retroperitoneum. Imaging on MRI demonstrates a mass with low signal intensity on T1-weighting imaging, and high signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging. On histology, a myxoid background is present with a storiform (or cartwheel) pattern seen on low-power imaging, seen in fibrosarcomas. A “myxoid background” is composed of a clear, mucoid substance. Treatment includes radiation, wide surgical resection, and chemotherapy in selected cases. However, the 5-year survival is 50%-60% depending on size, grade, depth and presence of metastasis. The term “malignant fibrous histiocytoma” was coined in the 1960s by Margaret R. Murray when histology a sarcoma demonstrated an appearance like histiocytes, with characteristics of phagocytosis and a pleomorphic pattern. With further research, this entity was identified to have a wider range of appearances with a fibrous characteristic. Today, these sarcomas are known as “pleomorphic sarcomas.” Recently, a change in the understanding of soft tissue tumors has purported that MFH is not a specific type of cancer, but a common morphologic pattern shared by unrelated tumors. One school of thought states that this morphologic pattern is shared by tumors as a common final pathway in cancer progression whereas another school of thought believes that true pleomorphic sarcomas are the result of a transformation from mesenchymal stem cells. Future research into understanding the pathway of these sarcomas and progression will help to target specific therapies and, hopefully, eventual cures. This model was created from the file STS_023.

    Free

  19. Version 1.0.0

    6 downloads

    This model is the left thigh muscle rendering of a 65-year-old male with left thigh myxoid fibrosarcoma. At the time of diagnosis, the patient had metastases to his lungs. The patient therefore underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy and was found to have an intermediate grade lesion at the time of diagnosis. The patient unfortunately died 9.5 months after diagnosis. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. Myxoid fibrosarcoma (or myxoid MFH) is the most common subtype of MFH, at about 10%-20% of cases. Clinically, the tumor presents as a deep, slow-growing, painless mass. It is located more commonly in the lower extremities and retroperitoneum. Imaging on MRI demonstrates a mass with low signal intensity on T1-weighting imaging, and high signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging. On histology, a myxoid background is present with a storiform (or cartwheel) pattern seen on low-power imaging, seen in fibrosarcomas. A “myxoid background” is composed of a clear, mucoid substance. Treatment includes radiation, wide surgical resection, and chemotherapy in selected cases. However, the 5-year survival is 50%-60% depending on size, grade, depth and presence of metastasis. The term “malignant fibrous histiocytoma” was coined in the 1960s by Margaret R. Murray when histology a sarcoma demonstrated an appearance like histiocytes, with characteristics of phagocytosis and a pleomorphic pattern. With further research, this entity was identified to have a wider range of appearances with a fibrous characteristic. Today, these sarcomas are known as “pleomorphic sarcomas.” Recently, a change in the understanding of soft tissue tumors has purported that MFH is not a specific type of cancer, but a common morphologic pattern shared by unrelated tumors. One school of thought states that this morphologic pattern is shared by tumors as a common final pathway in cancer progression whereas another school of thought believes that true pleomorphic sarcomas are the result of a transformation from mesenchymal stem cells. Future research into understanding the pathway of these sarcomas and progression will help to target specific therapies and, hopefully, eventual cures. This model was created from the file STS_023.

    Free

  20. Version 1.0.0

    6 downloads

    This model is the right thigh skin rendering of a 65-year-old male with left thigh myxoid fibrosarcoma. At the time of diagnosis, the patient had metastases to his lungs. The patient therefore underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy and was found to have an intermediate grade lesion at the time of diagnosis. The patient is still living with the metastatic disease at 2.5 years since diagnosis. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The thigh is divided into three compartments: the anterior, posterior, and adductor. After a femoral fracture or vascular injury in the thigh, increasing pressure within a compartment may threaten to compromise blood flow to muscles within the compartment, a syndrome known as “compartment syndrome.” Compartment syndrome is diagnosed clinically as “pain out of proportion to exam.” In patients that a clinical exam may not be obtained, such as those who are intubated or with a traumatic brain injury, a Stryker needle of each compartment may be performed. The diagnosis of compartment syndrome is defined as pressures within 30 mmHg of diastolic blood pressure. Compartment syndrome is an emergency and thigh fasciotomies must be performed immediately to prevent compromise of muscles within the compartment at risk. Thigh fasciotomies may be performed through a single incision for release of the anterior and posterior compartments, or a medial incision for decompression of the adductor compartment (less common). For the single incision technique, the incision is created laterally, and the fascia lata is incised. This exposes the anterior compartment, which is decompressed. The lateral intermuscular septum is then incised to decompress the posterior compartment. This model was created from the file STS_022.

    Free

  21. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    This model is the bilateral thigh skin rendering of a 65-year-old male with left thigh myxoid fibrosarcoma. At the time of diagnosis, the patient had metastases to his lungs. The patient therefore underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy and was found to have an intermediate grade lesion at the time of diagnosis. The patient is still living with the metastatic disease at 2.5 years since diagnosis. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. Myxoid fibrosarcoma (or myxoid MFH) is the most common subtype of MFH, at about 10%-20% of cases. Clinically, the tumor presents as a deep, slow-growing, painless mass. It is located more commonly in the lower extremities and retroperitoneum. Imaging on MRI demonstrates a mass with low signal intensity on T1-weighting imaging, and high signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging. On histology, a myxoid background is present with a storiform (or cartwheel) pattern seen on low-power imaging, seen in fibrosarcomas. A “myxoid background” is composed of a clear, mucoid substance. Treatment includes radiation, wide surgical resection, and chemotherapy in selected cases. However, the 5-year survival is 50%-60% depending on size, grade, depth and presence of metastasis. The term “malignant fibrous histiocytoma” was coined in the 1960s by Margaret R. Murray when histology a sarcoma demonstrated an appearance like histiocytes, with characteristics of phagocytosis and a pleomorphic pattern. With further research, this entity was identified to have a wider range of appearances with a fibrous characteristic. Today, these sarcomas are known as “pleomorphic sarcomas.” Recently, a change in the understanding of soft tissue tumors has purported that MFH is not a specific type of cancer, but a common morphologic pattern shared by unrelated tumors. One school of thought states that this morphologic pattern is shared by tumors as a common final pathway in cancer progression whereas another school of thought believes that true pleomorphic sarcomas are the result of a transformation from mesenchymal stem cells. Future research into understanding the pathway of these sarcomas and progression will help to target specific therapies and, hopefully, eventual cures. This model was created from the file STS_022.

    Free

  22. Version 1.0.0

    29 downloads

    This model is the right thigh muscle rendering of a 65-year-old male with left thigh myxoid fibrosarcoma. At the time of diagnosis, the patient had metastases to his lungs. The patient therefore underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy and was found to have an intermediate grade lesion at the time of diagnosis. The patient is still living with the metastatic disease at 2.5 years since diagnosis. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The thigh is divided into three compartments: the anterior, posterior, and adductor. The anterior compartment contains the “quadriceps muscles”, made up of the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis vastus intermedius, and rectus femoris, and the sartorius. These muscles are innervated by the femoral nerve (L3-L4), and act to extend the leg. The Sartorius muscle originates at the ASIS and crosses anterior to the quadriceps muscle to insert on the medial tibia in the pes anserinus. The posterior compartment contains the “hamstrings”, made up of the semitendinosus, semimembranosus, and short and long heads of the biceps femoris. These muscles act to flex the leg. All of these muscles are innervated by the sciatic nerve (tibial division) except for the short head of the biceps femoris, which is innervated by the sciatic nerve (peroneal division). The adductor compartment contains the adductor longus, adductor brevis, adductor magnus, and gracilis, which act to adduct the thigh. These muscles are innervated by the obturator, and the adductor magnus has dual innervation with the sciatic nerve. In addition, the obturator externus (a thigh external rotator) and pectineus muscle (thigh flexor and adductor) are located within this compartment. This model was created from the file STS_022.

    Free

  23. Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    This model is the left lower extremity muscle rendering of a 65-year-old male with left thigh myxoid fibrosarcoma. At the time of diagnosis, the patient had metastases to his lungs. The patient therefore underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy and was found to have an intermediate grade lesion at the time of diagnosis. The patient is still living with the metastatic disease at 2.5 years since diagnosis. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. Myxoid fibrosarcoma (or myxoid MFH) is the most common subtype of MFH, at about 10%-20% of cases. Clinically, the tumor presents as a deep, slow-growing, painless mass. It is located more commonly in the lower extremities and retroperitoneum. Imaging on MRI demonstrates a mass with low signal intensity on T1-weighting imaging, and high signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging. On histology, a myxoid background is present with a storiform (or cartwheel) pattern seen on low-power imaging, seen in fibrosarcomas. A “myxoid background” is composed of a clear, mucoid substance. Treatment includes radiation, wide surgical resection, and chemotherapy in selected cases. However, the 5-year survival is 50%-60% depending on size, grade, depth and presence of metastasis. The term “malignant fibrous histiocytoma” was coined in the 1960s by Margaret R. Murray when histology a sarcoma demonstrated an appearance like histiocytes, with characteristics of phagocytosis and a pleomorphic pattern. With further research, this entity was identified to have a wider range of appearances with a fibrous characteristic. Today, these sarcomas are known as “pleomorphic sarcomas.” Recently, a change in the understanding of soft tissue tumors has purported that MFH is not a specific type of cancer, but a common morphologic pattern shared by unrelated tumors. One school of thought states that this morphologic pattern is shared by tumors as a common final pathway in cancer progression whereas another school of thought believes that true pleomorphic sarcomas are the result of a transformation from mesenchymal stem cells. Future research into understanding the pathway of these sarcomas and progression will help to target specific therapies and, hopefully, eventual cures. This model was created from the file STS_022.

    Free

  24. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    This model is the left thigh muscle rendering of a 65-year-old male with left thigh myxoid fibrosarcoma. At the time of diagnosis, the patient had metastases to his lungs. The patient therefore underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy and was found to have an intermediate grade lesion at the time of diagnosis. The patient is still living with the metastatic disease at 2.5 years since diagnosis. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. Myxoid fibrosarcoma (or myxoid MFH) is the most common subtype of MFH, at about 10%-20% of cases. Clinically, the tumor presents as a deep, slow-growing, painless mass. It is located more commonly in the lower extremities and retroperitoneum. Imaging on MRI demonstrates a mass with low signal intensity on T1-weighting imaging, and high signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging. On histology, a myxoid background is present with a storiform (or cartwheel) pattern seen on low-power imaging, seen in fibrosarcomas. A “myxoid background” is composed of a clear, mucoid substance. Treatment includes radiation, wide surgical resection, and chemotherapy in selected cases. However, the 5-year survival is 50%-60% depending on size, grade, depth and presence of metastasis. The term “malignant fibrous histiocytoma” was coined in the 1960s by Margaret R. Murray when histology a sarcoma demonstrated an appearance like histiocytes, with characteristics of phagocytosis and a pleomorphic pattern. With further research, this entity was identified to have a wider range of appearances with a fibrous characteristic. Today, these sarcomas are known as “pleomorphic sarcomas.” Recently, a change in the understanding of soft tissue tumors has purported that MFH is not a specific type of cancer, but a common morphologic pattern shared by unrelated tumors. One school of thought states that this morphologic pattern is shared by tumors as a common final pathway in cancer progression whereas another school of thought believes that true pleomorphic sarcomas are the result of a transformation from mesenchymal stem cells. Future research into understanding the pathway of these sarcomas and progression will help to target specific therapies and, hopefully, eventual cures. This model was created from the file STS_022.

    Free

  25. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    This model is the bilateral thigh rendering of a 49-year-old male with a right medial thigh undifferentiated pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH). The patient underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy treatment and was found to have a high-grade lesion at the time of diagnosis. Metastases to his lungs were also found at diagnosis. The patient is still living with the disease at 2 years since diagnosis. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. Undifferentiated pleomorphic MFH has more recently been classified as Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma. This is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in late adulthood, commonly occurring between 55 to 80 years old and most commonly in Caucasian males. Clinically, it presents as a slow growing mass in the extremities. Biopsy of the lesion demonstrates, as its name implies, an undifferentiated and pleomorphic appearance. Pleomorphism is the pathologic description of cells and nuclei with variability in size, shape and staining, which is characteristic of a malignant neoplasm. “Undifferentiated” means that the tissue does not appear like an identifiable tissue structure. Treatment consists of wide resection and radiation. Chemotherapy is added in cases of metastasis, most commonly to the lung. Five-year survival is between 35-60% depending on grade of tumor and metastases. This model was created from the file STS_021.

    Free

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