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Found 8 results

  1. From the album: embodi3D 3D Printed Models

    This skull with left MCA aneurysm was printed by embodi3D for a customer who wants to use the model for simulating neurosurgical aneurysm clipping.
  2. rpapandrea

    making guides

    I have been printing bones for surgical planning for over 5 years. I will sometimes invert a contralateral to create a "normal" template. My next step is to create custom cutting or drilling jigs. Does anyone have any experience with this? Any suggestions for software? Thanks, Rick Papandrea, MD Partner, Orthopaedic associates of WI 2014.forearm.pdf
  3. I recently attending this conference in Scottsdale Arizona. A lot of great models were on display. Here are a few for your enjoyment.
  4. If you are interested in learning about advanced digital technologies in head and neck reconstruction please check out this conference website: http://www.adt-conference.com/ The 2017 ADT meeting is hosted by the Facing Faces Institute in Amiens and will help identify and explore the future role of innovative digital technology in head and neck reconstruction. Between a myriad of advanced emerging technologies, specific focus will be placed on: Advanced Applications in Head and Neck Reconstruction Bernard Devauchelle, MD, PhD (Amiens, France) Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Stephen Feinberg, MD, PhD (Ann Arbor, USA) Theragnostic Applications of Magnetic Nanoparticles Florence Gazeau (Paris, France) The Parametric Human Project Azam Khan, PhD (Toronto, Canada) The conference will cover a range of topics that address advanced digital technology in relation to head, neck, and cranio-maxillo-facial reconstruction. Let me know if you have any questions!
  5. Cardiologists in Aalst, Belgium, 3D printed the hearts of two patients for preprocedural planning in the treatment of arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat). There are different types of arrhythmia and treatment thereof varies. Some conditions don’t require any treatment, while others call for medication or surgical procedures. One minimally invasive procedure is catheter ablation. During this procedure, a catheter delivers high-frequency electrical energy to a small area of tissue inside the heart that causes the abnormal heart rhythm. This energy scars the tissue, thus destroying the electrical pathway that causes the abnormality. Typically, each pathway needs to be disabled individually. Drs. Tom De Potter and Peter Geelen developed a new, more efficient ablation technique to treat arrhythmia. They now can treat the affected tissue in its entirety, rather than pathway by pathway. Given that everyone’s heart anatomy is different and the risks involved in using a new technique, they had their patients’ hearts 3D printed from a CT scan to practice, customize and perfect their technique. For updates on news and new blog entries, follow us on Twitter at @Embodi3D. Photo credit: http://www.hartcentrumaalst.be/nieuws
  6. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) just released guidance on the use of 3D printing for medical purposes in the USA. http://threedmedprint.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s41205-016-0005-9 I am particularly interested in how the FDA approval applies to software used to generate models that are used for surgical planning but not diagnostic purposes? It seems, from the article, that if the purpose of the 3D printed model is merely for thinking about or planning a surgery, it is a "visual aid" and FDA approved software is not required. The technical term is a "medical image hardcopy device," examples of which are laser printers and cameras. If it is used for diagnosis, then it should be discussed with the FDA. And if use for implantable medical devices or surgical cutting guides (i.e. stuff that touches the patient), then the whole process is under FDA approval. This correlates to what the paper's first author (Matthew Di Prima from FDA) said at the 2015 Bioinformatics Festival during this talk. Key part is at 4:41. https://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?Live=15417&bhcp=1 Anyone have any thoughts about this?
  7. My recent post on how I used 3D printing to save a spleen is really taking off (10k hits and growing!). It's a good read about how I 3D printing to help with a very difficult and unusual surgery. I think the membership might find it interesting.
  8. Version

    131 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file of the splenic artery shows three aneurysms. This model was created from a CT scan and used in pre-surgical testing. It accompanies the blog article Saving a Spleen with 3D Printing: Pre-Surgical Planning with Medical Models make "Impossible" Surgeries Possible. The file is distributed under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs license. If you wish to use this file for commercial purposes, please contact the author.

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