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Found 24 results

  1. Rocky antebracheums

    Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    Antebracheums, cropped from CT scan, to show forelimb angular deformities and to practice surgical correction, canine, k9, forelimb, angular limb deformity, surgery, radius, cubitus, veterinary, animal, .stl, 3d, model, printable, without, contrast

    Free

  2. MSAA

    Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    SPINE CT SCAN TESTING 00000 interbody cages, spinal, fixation, xrays, osteosynthesis, system, orthopedic, surgery, fracture, connectors, screws, rods, 3d, model, .stl, printable

    Free

  3. Top Orbital and Skull 3D Model STL Files on embodi3D® In our day-to-day lives, we rely on vision more than any of the other four senses, so it only makes sense that human anatomy has adapted to include several features which keep our eyes safe: tear ducts, eyelids, and of course the orbital bone. The orbit (also known as the "eye socket") provides a rigid form of support and protection for some of the most sensitive parts of the eye including the central retinal artery, maeula, retina, choroid, and sclera. The orbit has such complex anatomical features that modeling can prove difficult, and in many instances, the finer features of the orbital bone have been simply been averaged out. The orbital structure isn't one bone, but seven: the frontal, lacrimal, ethmoid, zygomatic, maxillary, and palatine, and sphenoid bones. Can you think of any part of the human body where seven bones converge to fulfill a singular purpose? In recognition of this phenomenal feature of the human anatomy (and one of the most recognizable parts of the human skull), this week's embodi3D® Top Uploads articles, we are featuring several standout uploads — all of which can be used to create an orbital and skull 3D model. As detailed in the scholarly article "Clinical application of three-dimensional printing technology in craniofacial plastic surgery" 3D printing techniques are being used in craniofacial surgeries and especially in reconstruction procedures the require complex modeling. Using the latest 3D printing technology and the STL files converted using democratiz3D®, the contralateral orbit can serve as a point of reference for those in the medical field since the ipsilateral structures taken with a CT scan can be easily converted into an STL file and then fed to a 3D printer. These technologies improve patient consultations, increase the quality of diagnostic information while also helping to improve the planning stage of the surgical process. During surgery, a 3D-printed model of the orbital can be used to orient surgical staff and serve as a guide for surgical resectioning procedures. While these files are available for free on the website, you must register with embodi3D® before you can begin uploading and converting your own CT scans into STL files as well as downloading and 3D printing anatomical models from other users. Every day the collection of anatomical models grows on the embodi3D® website. This is but one of the many ways embodi3D® is seeking to revolutionize medical practices. #1. An Awesome Model of the Orbit's Acute Anatomy The orbits are conical structures dividing the upper facial skeleton from the middle face and surround the organs of vision. Seven bones conjoin to form the orbital structure as we can see in the example below. #2. A 3D Model of the Orbit's Surface in STL Format This excellent 3D model of embodi3D® shows the superficial bony margin of the orbit, which is rectangular with rounded corners. The margin is discontinuous at the lacrimal fossa. The supraorbital notch (seen in the image below) is within the supraorbital rim and is closed to form the supraorbital foramen in 25% of individuals. The supratrochlear notch is medial to the supraorbital notch. #3. A CT Scan of an Orbital Floor Fracture Hisham published this excellent ct scan on embodi3D®. Direct fractures of the orbital floor can extend from fractures of the inferior orbital rim. Indications for repair of the orbital floor in these cases are the same as those for indirect (blowout) fractures. Indirect fractures of the orbital floor are not associated with fracture of the inferior orbital rim. #4. A 3D Model of an Orbital Fracture CT scans with coronal or sagittal views and 3D models help guide treatment. They allow evaluation of fracture size and extraocular muscle relationships, providing information that can be used to help predict enophthalmos and muscle entrapment. #5. 3D Model Showing an Orbital Fracture Dropbear upload this excellent example of a right orbit fracture. #6. An Orbit 3D Model (Printable) Showing Fibrous Dysplasia (FD) for Surgical Demonstration The FD is a benign slowly progressive disorder of bone, where normal cancellous bone is replaced by fibrous tissue and immature woven bone. This entity constitutes about 2.5 % of all bone tumors. References Choi, J. W., & Kim, N. (2015). Clinical application of three-dimensional printing technology in craniofacial plastic surgery. Archives of plastic surgery, 42(3), 267. Bibby, K., & McFadzean, R. (1994). Fibrous dysplasia of the orbit. British journal of ophthalmology, 78(4), 266-270.
  4. Version 1.0.0

    2 downloads

    tooth - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. tooth transplantation, ct, scan, without, contrast, tooth, transplantation, upper, lower, teeth, upper, lower, dental, dentistry, .stl, 3d, model, printable, axial, surgery

    Free

  5. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    tooth transplantation, ct, scan, without, contrast, tooth, transplantation, upper, lower, teeth, upper, lower, dental, dentistry, .stl, 3d, model, printable, axial, surgery

    Free

  6. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    CT scan for dental implant surgical guide - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. 3d, model, .stl, printable, sphenoid, bone, maxilla, maxillary, sinus, clinoid, apophysis, zygomatic, arch, mastoid, process, foramen, magnum, mastoid, process, cervical, spine, mandible, ramus, body, angle, coronoid, teeth, dental, incisor, molar, premolar, alveolar, implant, maxillofacial, surgery,

    Free

  7. britt

    Version 1.0.0

    2 downloads

    britt, mandible, x ray, edentula, implants, osteosynthesis, angle, body, ramus, bone, 3d, model, printable, .stl, nasal, septum, maxilla, hard, palate, coronoid, process, dental, maxillofacial, surgery

    Free

  8. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    This is my version of the Phenix CT dataset from the Osirix Dicom Library - an infant with Treacher-Collins syndrome and aplasia of the left zygomatic bone and maxilla after a reconstruction surgery with an autograft. I wanted to preserve the small details of the maxilla and the nasal cavity, so I segmented them manually. It took me a week. The spine is not done yet - I'm redoing it and I'll reupload the whole set in the following week. The model is 3D printable, but you'll need a multi-material extruder with soluble support for this purpose - PLA/PVA will be best (PLA/PVA is much better than ABS/HIPS in my opinion). I hope you'll enjoy it skull, face, 3d, model, printable, skull, skeleton, bone, ct, scan, maxilla, malformation, reconstruction, surgery, autograft, zygomatic, arch, fracture, craniotomy, stl, temporal, frontal, parietal, occipital, mandible, nasal, orbit, cervical, spine, clavicle, ribs, thorax, 3d, model, printable

    $20.00

  9. Massive skull defect

    Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    Iatrogenic skull defect following surgical excision due to severe maxillary osteomyelitis. CT scan, 5mm slices. Sketchfab The patient refused to make another scan, so I had to segment it manually from 5mm slices. The calvaria is made as a lid, so the model can be used as a candy jar... osteology, bone, skull, head, orbit, stl, 3d, model, printable, frontal, surgery, osteomyelitis, maxillary, calvaria, zygomatic, arch

    $10.00

  10. Version 1.0.0

    7 downloads

    Cone beam adult woman implant pacient - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. implant placement, stl, 3d model, bone, teeth, preoperative, implant, cone, beam, maxillofacial, surgery, orbit, nasal, septum, face, mandible, maxilla, zygomatic, arch, cervical, sine, magnun, sella, turica, clinoid, process, mastoid, temporal

    Free

  11. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    Cardiac CT Cropped - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. heart, stl, thorax, medistinum, aorta, ventricle, auricule, right, left, cardiac, cardiology, surgery, 3d model, sternum, ribs

    Free

  12. Version 1.0.0

    30 downloads

    CT TL Spine Scoliosis - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. stl, 3d, model, bone, printable, dorsal, lumbar, spine, vertebrae, body, lordosis, ciphosis, scoliosis, ribs, clavicle, traumatology, surgery

    Free

  13. Version 1.0.0

    2 downloads

    Nukki BlastInjuri - stl file processed, lower, limb, blast, injuri, external, tutor, femur, tibia, fibula, bone, 3d, model, stl, printable, traumatology, surgery This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more.

    Free

  14. Version 1.0.0

    7 downloads

    JC 2.1 - stl file processed, scoliosis, severe, bone, 3d model, stl, ribs, scapule, sternum, clavicle, pelvis, hip, printable, traumatology, surgery This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more.

    Free

  15. Version 1.0.0

    2 downloads

    JC Spine - stl file processed, bone, stl, 3d model, printable, thoracic, lumbar, spine, vertebrae, scoliosis, sacrum, pelvis, hip, coccix, traumatology, surgery This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more.

    Free

  16. class 3

    Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    This is a test file for a virtual planned surgery but trying to pair with skin and muscles in order to simulate a possible treatment plan. ct without contrast, stl, 3dmodel, dicom, head, bone

    Free

  17. Version 1.0.0

    6 downloads

    Class III Maloclusion - stl file processed skull, stl, face nasal, septum, maxillary, mandible, maloclusion, class iii, maxillofacial, surgery, zygomatic, arch, cervical, spine, temporal

    Free

  18. CanineForelimbs

    Version 1.0.0

    2 downloads

    CT Scan of both fore limbs from a dog with a slight bone deformity requiring corrective surgery.

    $5.00

  19. Defects and deformities of the vertebral column can have a debilitating impact on the patient’s quality of life. Thirteen-year-old Jocelynn Taylor was no different. She was diagnosed with scoliosis, a condition characterized by an abnormally curved spine that may develop in children during one of their growth spurts. Jocelynn’s condition prevented her from being active in school and at home. Her vertebral column was also pushing her lungs and preventing her from breathing normally. 3D Printing Aids in Complex Spinal Surgery Unlike most scoliosis patients, Jocelynn’s curvature extended past 100 degrees and required a complex surgery. Physicians at Children’s Hospital in Colorado took up the challenge under the supervision of Dr. Sumeet Garg. They worked closely with engineers at Mighty Oak Medical to create a specific three-dimensional (3D) model of Jocelynn’s spine. The model helped Dr. Garg with pre-surgical planning. He also practiced the surgery several times prior to the actual procedure and was prepared for any eventuality that could have crop up during the intervention. The surgeon also relied on additive printing technology to print customized brackets to straighten the vertebral column. Since the surgery, Jocelynn has been able to live life to without any restrictions and is immensely excited about the upcoming school year. Dr. Ralph Mobbs, a neurosurgeon at the Prince of Wales Hospital in Sydney, worked with an Australian medical device company to print an exact replica of a patient’s cervical spine and its underlying tumor. He used the model to understand the patient’s anatomy and practice the surgical intervention. In the past, doctors usually avoided such procedures as one small mistake could lead to permanent nerve damage and quadriplegia. The 3D model helped Dr. Mobbs successfully remove the patient’s tumor without impacting the surrounding nerves. Approximately 276,000 people across the United States are living with spinal cord injuries. An estimated 7 million people suffer from scoliosis. About 24,000 men and women have malignant tumors in their spinal cord. People also suffer from other spinal conditions such as spondylosis and intervertebral disc degeneration. Additive printing technology is influencing the way doctors approach these conditions and is helping improve patient outcomes significantly. 3D Printing Spinal Implants Spinal tumors have also received a lot of attention in recent times. While their treatment often involves drastic measures, 3D printing is making it easier for patients to recover and rehabilitate quickly after the intervention. For example, surgeons in China had to remove a significant portion of a patient’s backbone along with the tumor to prevent the spread of his cancer. While the patient was able to beat the disease, he was unable to use his legs. Orthopedic surgeons at Beijing’s Third University Hospital, under the supervision of Dr. Liu Zhongjun, 3D printed patient-specific spinal implants to replace five missing vertebrae. The 7.5-inch long titanium mesh constructs allow the patient’s own spinal cord to grow over time, and the implant will automatically biodegrade over time. Although some of these cases have received extensive media attention, they are not the only ones. Doctors across the globe are relying on 3D medical printing and bioprinting technologies to treat and manage many types of spinal conditions. In another important step forward,Oxford Performance Materials (OPM) received the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for its spinal implant system designed to replace thoracolumbar vertebrae T10 to L1. The Connecticut-based company is now offering hope to thousands of patients with spinal trauma or cancer. The polymer construct met all the load-bearing and fatigue requirements of the FDA and is now available for patient use through specific distributors. OPM is working to expand its product line to include additional lumbar and cervical vertebrae. Other companies and research organizations are also looking for newer treatments that will help patients lead productive lives, in spite of their spinal problems. Collectively, these attempts will make 3D printing technology indispensable in the not-so-distant future. Sources http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-22/tumour-patient-gets-worlds-first-3d-printed-vertebrae/7183132 http://english.cntv.cn/2014/08/18/VIDE1408306798015287.shtml http://www.tctmagazine.com/3D-printing-news/oxford-performance-materials-gets-fda-approval-for-first-in-kind-spine-fab-3d-printed-127384/
  20. IMG 2016 07 05 11:32:07

    From the album pre-surgical models

    The patient was presented with aggressive tumor in the right maxilla. Resection was performed and a pre-shaped titanium mesh was placed, using pre-operative 3D printed model.
  21. The removal and reconstruction of a large part of the chest wall is often required to treat malignant tumors that occur in the cartilage or bone of the ribcage. However, the potential for complications in these types of surgeries is unacceptably high—the overall complication rate is over 40% and the 30-day mortality rate is up to 17%. Many of the complications are respiratory-related. A team of doctors at Asturias University Central Hospital, in Asturias, Spain suspected that the patients’ difficulty breathing resulted from the stiffness of the implants. They performed a surgery using 3D printed titanium rib implant designed to be more flexible. Using 3D printing to produce rib implants to replace parts of the ribcage is not new. A world-first surgery with a 3D printed implant was also performed about a year ago, also in Spain, according to articles published in Forbes and Gizmodo (entry image credit). Because each person’s ribcage structure is unique, using 3D printing to produce such implants has the obvious advantage of producing an exact replica. Both implants were made using information from a CT scan, and printed using the same technique—layer-by-layer electron beam melting starting with titanium powder in a high vacuum by an Arcam Q10 printer. In this more recent surgery, the doctors made the implant less rigid by incorporating articulations as shown in the figure, on the right side of the implant. As you can see such a complicated object could only be created in one piece using 3D printing techniques. They published their findings in the Journal of Thoracic Disease. Picture of titanium rib implant, Journal of Thoracic Disease The 57 year old male patient regained normal function after six weeks without complications. CT scan eight weeks after surgery, Journal of Thoracic Disease
  22. hemimaxillectomy

    From the album Study models

    following hemimaxillectomy procedure, custom-made implant has been designed and 3D printed for demonstration purposes.
  23. IMG 7086

    From the album Study models

  24. Dr. Tatiana Kelil from Boston's Brigham and Women's hospital recently posted an outstanding overview of medical applications of 3D printing. It is really a well written article and worthwhile reading for anybody who is trying to learn about how 3D printing is revolutionizing medicine and surgery.