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Found 8 results

  1. Version 1.0.0

    415 downloads

    There are four STL files for 3D printing demonstrating a moderate secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) and a mild coarctation. An atrial septal defect is a birth defect of the heart in which there is a hole in the wall (septum) that divides the upper chambers of the heart (atria). A hole can vary in size and may close on its own or may require surgery. If one of these openings does not close, a hole is left, and it is called an atrial septal defect. The hole increases the amount of blood that flows through the lungs and over time, it may cause damage to the blood vessels in the lungs. Damage to the blood vessels in the lungs may cause problems in adulthood, such as high blood pressure in the lungs and heart failure. Other problems may include abnormal heartbeat, and increased risk of stroke. MRI obtained for evaluation of distal arch and pulmonary veins due to findings of pulmonary overcirculation out of proportion to typical ASD pathophysiology. The MRI provided a complete anatomic overview and quantified the right sided enlargement from the 2:1 shunt through the ASD. Due to saturation band nulling of blood returning through the right sided pulmonary veins, there was excellent definition of the ASD due to the "dark" blood mixing with the "bright" blood and outlining the borders of the ASD which transfers to the model very well. Please keep in mind, that the model represents a heart in end-systole rather than diastole. Disclaimer: The available model has been validated to demonstrate the case’s pathologic features on a Z450 3D printer, (3DSystems, Circle Rock Hill, South Carolina)(or other printer as appropriate). While the mask applied to the original DICOM images accurately represents the anatomic features, some anatomic detail may be lost due to thin walled structures or inadequate supporting architecture; while other anatomic detail may be added due to similar limitations resulting in bleeding of modeling materials into small negative spaces. However, intracardiac structures, relationships, and pathologic features represent anatomic findings to scale and in high detail. Credit: The model is provided for distribution on Embodi3D with the permission of the author, pediatric cardiologist Dr. Matthew Bramlet, MD, and is part of the Congenital Heart Defects library. We thank Dr. Bramlet and all others who are working to help children with congenital heart problems lead normal and happy lives. It is distributed by Dr. Bramlet under the Creative Commons license Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs. Please respect the terms of the licensing agreement.

    Free

  2. This week we want to share with the embodi3D community the seven most downloaded models from the dental, orthodontic and maxillofacial category. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, as well as the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. The most downloaded file is an STL model of a woman's mandible. This model was 3D printed by an embodi3D member with excellent results. Be sure to click through and check out this STL file and images of the resulting 3D dental print. The list also includes other great 3D dental models. You might be interested in our list of top 10 human heart STL files or our list of free human anatomy STL files including brain, heart, mandible and spine. We also have a list of the ten most downloaded 3D printable STL files on embodi3d.com. Don’t forget to register and download the STL files so you can 3D print the models yourself. Please reply to this post with which model you like best. 1. An excellent 3D model of a woman's mandible with great detail. 2. This model was created from a conebeam CT and segmented on itk-snap. 3. A highly detailed dental scan shows the bony anatomy of the maxilla, mandible and facial structures in great detail. 4. 3D model of the mandibula with details of the teeth 5. A 3d model of the mandible for implant study. 6. Digital model of the orbit with the frontal bone shown. 7. A beautiful STL file 3D model of parasymphyseal and subcondylar mandibular fractures. Please reply to this post with which model you like best or if you know of a good file which should be included post it here. References 1. Dawood, A., Marti, B. M., Sauret-Jackson, V., & Darwood, A. (2015). 3D printing in dentistry. British dental journal, 219(11), 521.
  3. Version 1.0.0

    201 downloads

    These congenital heart defect STL files demonstrate Partial Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return (PAPVR). In PAPVR, one or two of the pulmonary veins returns blood to the right atrium instead of the left atrium. This causes oxygen-rich blood to flow back to the lungs instead of on to the rest of the body. Because some oxygen-rich blood is continually flowing between the lungs and the right atrium, the right chambers of the heart may become dilated. Over time, this may cause an abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia). In addition, too much blood flow to the lungs may increase the pressure in the lung's blood vessels, leading to a condition called pulmonary hypertension. If only one of the pulmonary veins is affected by the disorder, there may not be any symptoms. If two of the veins are affected, there may be shortness of breath during heavy exercise. Aortic coarctation is also present. Coarctation of the aorta is a narrowing of the aorta, the main blood vessel carrying oxygen-rich blood from the left ventricle of the heart to all of the organs of the body. Coarctation occurs most commonly in a short segment of the aorta just beyond where the arteries to the head and arms take off, as the aorta arches inferiorly toward the chest and abdomen. There are three STL files for 3D printing this model in slices. A whole model STL file is also available for 3D printing. Demonstrated is a bicuspid aortic valve and history of coarctation repair within the first week of life by end to end anastomosis. MRI obtained for evaluation of distal arch. MRI findings: • PAPVR of left upper lobe to innominate vein: Qp:Qs of 1.4:1 • Mild residual narrowing of second transverse segment of the aortic arch. • Moderate post-stenotic dilation of aorta MRI images obtained at end-systole due to tachycardic heart rate during exam. RV End-systolic volume is 36.3 ml. LV End-systolic volume is 30.06 ml. MRI methods: A GE 1.5T HDxt system was used for the 3D HEART sequence which used a 3D respiratory-navigated balanced SSFP (steady state free precession) multi-slab sequence with T2 preparation that provides whole heart coverage with high contrast-to-noise ratio between vessels and myocardium. Due to the relatively fast heart rate of 122 bpm, the fat saturation was turned off to decrease the time needed for the prepatory pulse brining the acquisition window earlier into the cardiac cycle so that it could be centered on the quiescent stage of end systole. The sequence was run with the following parameters: TR 3.4, TE 1.4, Freq 224, Phase 160, RR 8, and fat sat off. Learning: The MRI identified previously un-diagnosed partial anomalous pulmonary venous return. However, the Qp:Qs fell within acceptable left to right shunting of < 1.5:1 and there was insignificant RV, RA enlargement. The MRI evaluation of the coarctation repair revealed a good repair with only mild narrowing, which appeared more severe by echo due to the post-stenotic dilation. Disclaimer: The available model has been validated to demonstrate the case’s pathologic features on a Z450 3D printer, (3DSystems, Circle Rock Hill, South Carolina)(or other printer as appropriate). While the mask applied to the original DICOM images accurately represents the anatomic features, some anatomic detail may be lost due to thin walled structures or inadequate supporting architecture; while other anatomic detail may be added due to similar limitations resulting in bleeding of modeling materials into small negative spaces. However, intracardiac structures, relationships, and pathologic features represent anatomic findings to scale and in high detail. Credit: The model is provided for distribution on Embodi3D with the permission of the author, pediatric cardiologist Dr. Matthew Bramlet, MD, and is part of the Congenital Heart Defects library. We thank Dr. Bramlet and all others who are working to help children with congenital heart problems lead normal and happy lives. It is distributed by Dr. Bramlet under the Creative Commons license Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs. Please respect the terms of the licensing agreement.

    Free

  4. What kind of 3D printers work best for printing from CT scans? In terms of resolution, what have others experienced and what sort of resolutions are needed for the models to actually be used for surgical planning?
  5. 122 downloads

    Double aortic arch is a relatively rare congenital cardiovascular malformation. Double aortic arch is an anomaly of the aortic arch in which two aortic arches form a complete vascular ring that can compress the trachea and/or esophagus. Embryologically, the aorta's right sided 4th arch failed to regress which resulted in this double aortic arch and vascular ring. Depending on how tight the ring is, symptoms in infancy are related to respiratory compression, compared to a later presentation in childhood or adulthood of swallowing difficulty. Please see the related STL file for 3D printing double aortic arch blood pool model. There are 3 separate files so the heart can be printed in slices. A fourth STL files is for 3D printing the whole heart model. The three part model has holes for magnets, which can be used to connect and separate the pieces. A US quarter is shown for scale in the images below. The model is provided for distribution on Embodi3D with the permission of the author, pediatric cardiologist Dr. Matthew Bramlet, MD, and is part of the Congenital Heart Defects library. We thank Dr. Bramlet and all others who are working to help children with congenital heart problems lead normal and happy lives. It is distributed by Dr. Bramlet under the Creative Commons license Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs. Please respect the terms of the licensing agreement.

    Free

  6. 169 downloads

    Pneumonia is a common lung infection caused by bacteria, a virus or fungi. Pneumonia is an inflammatory condition of the lung affecting primarily the microscopic air sacs known as alveoli. It is often spread via coughing, sneezing, or even breathing. Most healthy people recover from pneumonia in one to three weeks, but pneumonia can be life-threatening. Pneumonia affects approximately 450 million people globally per year (7% of the population) and results in about 4 million deaths. The models are provided for distribution on embodi3D.com with the permission of the creators Dr. Beth Ripley and Dr. Tatiana. These models are part of the Top 10 Killers 3D printable disease library. James Weaver and Ahmed Hosny also contributed to the project. We thank everyone involved for their contributions to embodi3d.com and their advocacy for better health and education through 3D printing. There are three STL files available for download and 3D bioprinting. One STL file for 3D printing the lung, A second STL file for printing the tissue presenting as pneumonia and a third file for printing the airway. All three files have been zipped to reduce the file size. You will need to unzip the files once you have downloaded them.These files are distributed under the Creative Commons license Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs. Please respect the terms of the licensing agreement.

    Free

  7. 53 downloads

    Diabetes describes a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood sugar, either because insulin production is inadequate, or because the body's cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Worldwide there are over 400 million people with diabetes. Diabetes disrupts the vascular system, affecting many areas of the body such as the eyes, kidneys, legs, and feet. Diabetes often leads to peripheral vascular disease that inhibits a person's blood circulation. With this condition, there is a narrowing of the arteries that frequently leads to significantly decreased circulation in the lower part of the legs and the feet. Poor circulation contributes to diabetic foot problems by reducing the amount of oxygen and nutrition supplied to the skin and other tissue, causing injuries to heal poorly. Preventing foot complications is more critical for the diabetic patient because poor circulation impairs the healing process and can lead to ulcers, infection, and other serious foot conditions. There are three STL files available for download and 3D bioprinting. One STL file for bioprinting the foot, one for the soft tissue and the third STL file is for the ischemic foot ulcer. All three files have been zipped to reduce file size. You will need to unzip the files once you have downloaded them.These files are distributed under the Creative Commons license Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs. Please respect the terms of the licensing agreement. The models are provided for distribution on embodi3D.com with the permission of the creators Dr. Beth Ripley and Dr. Tatiana. These models are part of the Top 10 Killers 3D printable disease library. James Weaver and Ahmed Hosny also contributed to the project. We thank everyone involved for their contributions to embodi3d.com and their advocacy for better health and education through 3D printing.

    Free

  8. Dear Community Members, After many months of work, we are happy to announce the addition of a feature that will allow you to sell medical models you have designed on Embodi3D.com. While we always have encouraged our members to consider allowing their medical STL files to be downloaded for free, we understand that when a ton of time is invested in creating a valuable and high-quality model, it is reasonable to ask for something in return. Now Embodi3D members have two options: 1) You can share your medical models for free, or 2) you can charge for them. We hope these two options encourage more sharing and file uploads. The more models available, the more it helps the medical 3D printing community. For more details on how to sell your medical masterpieces on Embodi3D, go to the selling page. Thanks, and happy 3D printing! The Management
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