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Found 16 results

  1. Please note that any references to “Imag3D” in this tutorial has been replaced with “democratiz3D” In this tutorial you will learn how to create multiple 3D printable bone models simultaneously using the free online CT scan to bone STL converter, democratiz3D. We will use the free desktop program Slicer to convert our CT scan in DICOM format to NRRD format. We will also make a small section of the CT scan into its own NRRD file to create a second stand-alone model. The NRRD files will then be uploaded to the free democratiz3D online service to be converted into 3D printable STL models. If you haven't already, please see the tutorial A Ridiculously Easy Way to Convert CT Scans to 3D Printable Bone STL Models for Free in Minutes, which provides a good overview of the democratiz3D service. You should download the file pack that accompanies this tutorial. This contains an anonymized DICOM data set that will allow you to follow along with the tutorial. >>> DOWNLOAD THE TUTORIAL FILE PACK <<< Step 1: Register for an Embodi3D account If you haven't already done so, you'll need to register for an embodi3D account. Registration is free and only takes a minute. Once you are registered you'll receive a confirmatory email that verifies you are the owner of the registered email account. Click the link in the email to activate your account. The democratiz3D service will use this email account to send you notifications when your files are ready for download. Step 2: Create NRRD Files from DICOM with Slicer Open Slicer, which can be downloaded for free from www.slicer.org. Take the folder that contains your DICOM scan files and drag and drop it onto the slicer window, as shown in Figure 1. If you downloaded the tutorial file pack, a complete DICOM data set is included. Click OK when asked to load the study into the DICOM database. Click Copy when asked if you want to copy the images into the local database directory. Remember, this only works with CT scans. MRIs cannot be converted at this time. Figure 1: Dragging and dropping the DICOM folder onto the Slicer application. This will load the CT scan. A NRRD file that encompasses the entire scan can easily be created by clicking the save button at this point. Before we do that however, we are going to create a second NRRD file that only contains the lumbar spine, which will allow us to create a second 3D printable bone model of the lumbar spine. Open the CT scan by clicking on the Show DICOM Browser button, selecting the scan and series within the scan, and clicking the Load button. The CT scan will then load within the multipanel viewer. From the drop-down menu at the top left of the Slicer window, select All Modules and then Crop Volume, as shown in Figure 2. You will now want to create a Region Of Interest (ROI) to encompass the smaller volume we want to make. Turn on the ROI visibility button and then under the Input ROI drop-down menu, select "Create new AnnotationROI," As shown in Figure 3. Figure 2: Choosing the Crop Volume module Figure 3: Turn on ROI visibility and Create a new AnnotationROI under the Input ROI drop-down menu. A small cube will then be displayed in the blue volume window. This represents the sub volume that will be made. In its default position, the cube may not overlay the body, and may need to be dragged downward. Grab a control point on the cube and drag it downward (inferiorly) as shown in Figure 4. Figure 4: Grab the sub volume ROI and drag it downwards until it overlaps with the body. Next, use the control points on the volume box to position the volume box over the portion of the scan you wish to be included in the small 3D printable model, as shown in Figure 5. Figure 5: Adjusting the control points on the crop volume box. Once you have the box position where you want it, initiate the volume crop by clicking the Crop! button, as shown in Figure 6. Figure 6: The Crop! button You have now have two scan volumes that can be 3D printed. The first is the entire scan, and the second is the smaller sub volume that contains only the lumbar spine. We are now going to save those individual volumes as NRRD files. Click the Save button in the upper left-hand corner. In the Save Scene window, uncheck all items that do not have NRRD as the file format, as shown in Figure 7. Only NRRD file should be checked. Be sure to specify the directory that you want each file to be saved in. Figure 7: The Save Scene window Your NRRD files should now be saved in the directory you specified. Step 3: Upload your NRRD files and Convert to STL Files Using the Free democratiz3D Service Launch your web browser and go to www.embodi3d.com. If you haven't already register for a account. Registration is free and only takes a minute. Click on the democratiz3D navigation item and select Launch App, as shown in Figure 8. Figure 8: launching the democratiz3D application. Drag-and-drop both of your NRRD files onto the upload panel. Fill in the required fields, including a title, short description, privacy setting (private versus shared), and license type. You must agree to the terms of use. Please note that even though license type is a required field, it only matters if the file is shared. If you keep the file private and thus not available to other members on the site, they will not see it nor be able to download it. Be sure to turn on the democratiz3D Processing slider! If you don't turn this on your file will not be processed but will just be saved in your account on the website. It should be green when turned on. Once you turn on democratiz3D Processing, you'll be presented with some basic processing options, as shown in Figure 9. Leave the default operation as "CT NRRD to Bone STL," which is the operation that creates a basic bone model from a CT scan in NRRD format. Threshold is the Hounsfield attenuation to use for selecting the bones. The default value of 150 is good for most applications, but if you have a specialized model you wish to create, you can adjust this value. Quality denotes the number of polygons in your output file. High-quality may take longer to process and produce larger files. These are more appropriate for very large or detailed structures, such as an entire spinal column. Low quality is best for small structures that are geometrically simple, such as a patella. Medium quality is balanced, and is appropriate for most circumstances. Figure 9: The democratiz3D File Processing Parameters. Once you are satisfied with your processing parameters, click submit. Both of your nrrd files will be processed in two separate bone STL files, as shown in Figure 10. The process takes 10 to 20 minutes and you will receive an email notifying you that your files are ready. Please note, the stl processing will finish first followed by the images. Click on the thumbnails for each model to access the file for download or click the title. Figure 10: Two files have been processed simultaneously and are ready for download Step 4: CT scan conversion is complete your STL bone model files are ready for 3D Printing That's it! Both of your bone models are ready for 3D printing. I hope you enjoyed this tutorial. Please use the democratiz3D service and SHARE the files you create with the community by changing their status from private or shared. Thank you very much and happy 3D printing!
  2. 604 downloads

    Bony anatomy and skin surface of the L and R feet, as extracted from a CT DICOM dataset (0.5 mm slice thickness x 250 slices). This example highlights the inherent difficulty in using CT number segmentation to extract bony anatomy - there are some significant holes present in the structure. When the CT number threshold window was expanded to close these holes, part of the soft tissue was included in the segmentation, corrupting the bony structure. Sometimes even bony segmentation it is not as straightforward as we would like (especially for one of the most complex bony structures in the human body - the feet)! The skin surface was very easy to extract - just dial up the window width to include all of the dataset. Meshlab was used to clean up the STL, split the file into two separate feet, and reduce the vertex count. Thanks once again to Dr Mike for the excellent renders and the .Find us at www.healthphysics.com.au

    Free

  3. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    This is my version of the Phenix CT dataset from the Osirix Dicom Library - an infant with Treacher-Collins syndrome and aplasia of the left zygomatic bone and maxilla after a reconstruction surgery with an autograft. I wanted to preserve the small details of the maxilla and the nasal cavity, so I segmented them manually. It took me a week. The spine is not done yet - I'm redoing it and I'll reupload the whole set in the following week. The model is 3D printable, but you'll need a multi-material extruder with soluble support for this purpose - PLA/PVA will be best (PLA/PVA is much better than ABS/HIPS in my opinion). I hope you'll enjoy it skull, face, 3d, model, printable, skull, skeleton, bone, ct, scan, maxilla, malformation, reconstruction, surgery, autograft, zygomatic, arch, fracture, craniotomy, stl, temporal, frontal, parietal, occipital, mandible, nasal, orbit, cervical, spine, clavicle, ribs, thorax, 3d, model, printable

    $20.00

  4. Version 1.0.0

    11 downloads

    Real Size Human Left Foot This is a 3D rendering 3D printable model of human foot from MRI images. All bones of foot are connected and make it to be "One-Piece" model. Height quality STL file just ready to printing. A model can be used to study anatomy, biology and physiology.

    $5.00

  5. Version 1.0.0

    2 downloads

    CT Scan of both fore limbs from a dog with a slight bone deformity requiring corrective surgery.

    $5.00

  6. Version 1.0.0

    11 downloads

    Whole body: chest, abdomen and pelvis The chest wall (thoracic cage) is composed by twelve pairs of ribs laterally and the sternum anteriorly. The ribs are attached to the dorsal vertebrae (thoracic spine) posteriorly and along their costal cartilage to the sternum. The thoracic cage main function is to protect the vital chest organs such as the heart and lungs. The cervical spine is the upper most spines forming the spinal column, extending from the skull base to the level of the thoracic vertebra (the spines with attached ribs). The cervical spines are usually seven and the main function is to support the skull and to protect the spinal cord. The dorsal (thoracic) spine forms the middle portion of the vertebral column extending below the seventh cervical vertebra to above the first lumbar vertebra. The dorsal spine is formed by twelve vertebral bodies. The vertebrae forming the dorsal spine are unique in shape as they are the only vertebral bodies articulating with ribs. The lumbar spine represents the mid-lower segment of the vertebral column and is composed of five adjacent vertebrae. They are convex anteriorly to form a lumbar lordosis. The lumbar spine facet joints allows limited movements and rotation. The bony pelvis is formed by 4 bones; a pair of hip bones, the sacrum and the coccyx. The bony pelvis supports the pelvic viscera and works to transmit force from the axial skeleton to the lower limbs. The two hip bones are related anteriorly by the symphysis pubis and posteriorly to the sacroiliac joints bilaterally. The original CT examination can be reviewed at: The 3D muscle model created from this scan can be reviewed at: The 3D skin model created from this scan can be reviewed at:

    Free

  7. Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    Whole body: chest, abdomen and pelvis The chest wall (thoracic cage) is composed by twelve pairs of ribs laterally and the sternum anteriorly. The ribs are attached to the dorsal vertebrae (thoracic spine) posteriorly and along their costal cartilage to the sternum. The thoracic cage main function is to protect the vital chest organs such as the heart and lungs. The cervical spine is the upper most spines forming the spinal column, extending from the skull base to the level of the thoracic vertebra (the spines with attached ribs). The cervical spines are usually seven and the main function is to support the skull and to protect the spinal cord. The dorsal (thoracic) spine forms the middle portion of the vertebral column extending below the seventh cervical vertebra to above the first lumbar vertebra. The dorsal spine is formed by twelve vertebral bodies. The vertebrae forming the dorsal spine are unique in shape as they are the only vertebral bodies articulating with ribs. The lumbar spine represents the mid-lower segment of the vertebral column and is composed of five adjacent vertebrae. They are convex anteriorly to form a lumbar lordosis. The lumbar spine facet joints allows limited movements and rotation. The bony pelvis is formed by 4 bones; a pair of hip bones, the sacrum and the coccyx. The bony pelvis supports the pelvic viscera and works to transmit force from the axial skeleton to the lower limbs. The two hip bones are related anteriorly by the symphysis pubis and posteriorly to the sacroiliac joints bilaterally. The original CT examination can be reviewed at: The 3D bone model created from this scan can be reviewed at: The 3D skin model created from this scan can be reviewed at:

    Free

  8. Version 1.0.0

    28 downloads

    Whole body: chest, abdomen and pelvis The chest wall (thoracic cage) is composed by twelve pairs of ribs laterally and the sternum anteriorly. The ribs are attached to the dorsal vertebrae (thoracic spine) posteriorly and along their costal cartilage to the sternum. The thoracic cage main function is to protect the vital chest organs such as the heart and lungs. The cervical spine is the upper most spines forming the spinal column, extending from the skull base to the level of the thoracic vertebra (the spines with attached ribs). The cervical spines are usually seven and the main function is to support the skull and to protect the spinal cord. The dorsal (thoracic) spine forms the middle portion of the vertebral column extending below the seventh cervical vertebra to above the first lumbar vertebra. The dorsal spine is formed by twelve vertebral bodies. The vertebrae forming the dorsal spine are unique in shape as they are the only vertebral bodies articulating with ribs. The lumbar spine represents the mid-lower segment of the vertebral column and is composed of five adjacent vertebrae. They are convex anteriorly to form a lumbar lordosis. The lumbar spine facet joints allows limited movements and rotation. The bony pelvis is formed by 4 bones; a pair of hip bones, the sacrum and the coccyx. The bony pelvis supports the pelvic viscera and works to transmit force from the axial skeleton to the lower limbs. The two hip bones are related anteriorly by the symphysis pubis and posteriorly to the sacroiliac joints bilaterally. This model represents a case of right para-scapular pleomorphic spindle cell undifferentiated sarcoma in a 61 years old male, dedicated model can be reviewed at: The CT scan is derived from the file STS_037 The 3D bone model created from this scan can be reviewed at: The 3D muscle model created from this scan can be reviewed at: The 3D skin model created from this scan can be reviewed at:

    Free

  9. Version 1.0.0

    4 downloads

    Whole body: chest, abdomen and pelvis The chest wall (thoracic cage) is composed by twelve pairs of ribs laterally and the sternum anteriorly. The ribs are attached to the dorsal vertebrae (thoracic spine) posteriorly and along their costal cartilage to the sternum. The thoracic cage main function is to protect the vital chest organs such as the heart and lungs. The cervical spine is the upper most spines forming the spinal column, extending from the skull base to the level of the thoracic vertebra (the spines with attached ribs). The cervical spines are usually seven and the main function is to support the skull and to protect the spinal cord. The dorsal (thoracic) spine forms the middle portion of the vertebral column extending below the seventh cervical vertebra to above the first lumbar vertebra. The dorsal spine is formed by twelve vertebral bodies. The vertebrae forming the dorsal spine are unique in shape as they are the only vertebral bodies articulating with ribs. The lumbar spine represents the mid-lower segment of the vertebral column and is composed of five adjacent vertebrae. They are convex anteriorly to form a lumbar lordosis. The lumbar spine facet joints allows limited movements and rotation. The bony pelvis is formed by 4 bones; a pair of hip bones, the sacrum and the coccyx. The bony pelvis supports the pelvic viscera and works to transmit force from the axial skeleton to the lower limbs. The two hip bones are related anteriorly by the symphysis pubis and posteriorly to the sacroiliac joints bilaterally. The original CT examination can be reviewed at: The 3D bone model created from this scan can be reviewed at: The 3D muscle model created from this scan can be reviewed at:

    Free

  10. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    Clavicle: The clavicle (collar bone) is the only bone connecting the pectoral girdle to the axial skeleton and is the only long bone that lies horizontally in human skeleton. The clavicle articulates with acromion at the acromioclavicular joint laterally and the sternum at the sternoclavicular joint medially. It is the first bone to start ossification at around 5th-6th weeks of gestation but finishes around 21-25 years of age. The CT scan is dervied from the file STS_037 The original CT examination can be reviewed at:

    Free

  11. Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    The clavicle (collar bone) is the only bone connecting the pectoral girdle to the axial skeleton and is the only long bone that lies horizontally in human skeleton. The clavicle articulates with acromion at the acromioclavicular joint laterally and the sternum at the sternoclavicular joint medially. It is the first bone to start ossification at around 5th-6th weeks of gestation but finishes around 21-25 years of age. The model shows parts of the related joints, bones and ribs. This 3D model was created from the file STS_037 The original CT examination can be reviewed at:

    Free

  12. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    The clavicle (collar bone) is the only bone connecting the pectoral girdle to the axial skeleton and is the only long bone that lies horizontally in human skeleton. The clavicle articulates with acromion at the acromioclavicular joint laterally and the sternum at the sternoclavicular joint medially. It is the first bone to start ossification at around 5th-6th weeks of gestation but finishes around 21-25 years of age. The CT scan is derived from the file STS_037 The 3D bone model created from this scan can be reviewed at:

    Free

  13. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    The clavicle (collar bone) is the only bone connecting the pectoral girdle to the axial skeleton and is the only long bone that lies horizontally in human skeleton. The clavicle articulates with acromion at the acromioclavicular joint laterally and the sternum at the sternoclavicular joint medially. It is the first bone to start ossification at around 5th-6th weeks of gestation but finishes around 21-25 years of age. The model shows parts of the related joints, bones and ribs. This 3D model was created from the file STS_037 The original CT examination can be reviewed at:

    Free

  14. Version 1.0.0

    9 downloads

    This is the normal right hip model of an 82-year-old male. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The hip joint is a ball and socket joint that has intrinsic stability from osseous, ligamentous, and muscular structures. The hip capsule is made of the iliofemoral, pubofemoral, and ischiofemoral ligaments which attach from the acetabulum to the femoral neck. The normal acetabulum is anteverted 15 degrees and abducted 45 degrees. The normal femoral anteversion is between 10-15 degrees. The proximal femur also includes the greater trochanter, to which the external rotators are attached, and the lesser trochanter, to which the iliopsoas is attached. This model was created from the file STS_013.

    Free

  15. Version 1.0.0

    9 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file contains a model of the bones of the chest abdomen and pelvis derived from a CT. Several ribs are missing as they were disconnected from the axial skeleton. This model was created using the Imag3D 3D model creation service TCGA-CS-6185

    Free

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