Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'medical model'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Blogs

  • Embodi3d Test Blog
  • 3D Printing in Medicine
  • Cool Medical 3D-Printing
  • 3D Bio Printing by Paige Anne Carter
  • SSchoppert's Blog
  • Additive Manufacturing in Medicine
  • biomedical 3D printing
  • Bryce's Blog
  • Chris Leggett
  • 3D Models Help Improve Surgical Precision, Reduce Operating Time
  • Desktop 3D Printing in Medical Imaging
  • 3D Printing: Radiology corner
  • The Embodi3D.com Blog
  • descobar3d's Blog
  • 3D Printing in Anthropology
  • Learn to 3D Print: Basic Tools from software to printers
  • 3D printing for bio-medicine
  • 3D Biomedical Printing - by Jacob M.
  • Valchanov's Blog
  • Deirdre_Manion-Fischer's Blog
  • Matt Johnson's Biomedical 3D Printing Blog
  • Devarsh Vyas's Biomedical 3D Printing Blogs
  • Devarsh Vyas's Biomedical 3D Printing Blogs
  • Mike at Medical Models
  • TOP TEN THE MOST DOWNLOADED EMBODI3D

Forums

  • Biomedical 3D Printing
    • Hardware and 3D Printers
    • democratiz3D®
    • Software
    • Clinical applications
    • 3D Printable Models
    • Medical Imaging: CT, MRI, US
    • Science and Research
    • News and Trending Topics
    • Education, Conferences, Meetings, Events
    • Member Lounge (new!)
    • General
  • Classifieds, Goods and Services
    • General Classifieds - members post free
    • Services needed
    • Services offered
    • Stuff for sale/needed
    • Post a Job
    • Looking for work - visible only to members

Categories

  • democratiz3D® Processing
  • Bones
    • Skull and Head
    • Dental, Orthodontic, Maxillofacial
    • Spine and Pelvis
    • Extremity, Upper (Arm)
    • Extremity, Lower (Leg)
    • Thorax and Ribs
    • Whole body
    • Skeletal tumors, fractures and bony pathology
  • Muscles
    • Head and neck muscles
    • Extremity, Lower (Leg) Muscles
    • Extremity, Upper (Arm) Muscles
    • Thorax and Ribs Muscles
    • Abdomen and Pelvis muscles
    • Whole body Muscles
    • Muscular tumors and sarcomas
  • Cardiac and Vascular
    • Heart
    • Congenital Heart Defects
    • Aorta
    • Mesenteric and abdominal arteries
    • Veins
  • Organs of the Body
    • Brain and nervous system
    • Kidneys
    • Lungs
    • Liver
    • Other organs
  • Skin
  • Veterinary
    • Dogs
    • Cats
    • Other
  • Science and Research
    • Paleontology
    • Anthropology
    • Misc Research
  • Miscellaneous
    • Formlabs
  • Medical CT Scan Files
    • Skull, Head, and Neck CTs
    • Dental, Orthodontic, Maxillofacial CTs
    • Thorax and Ribs CTs
    • Abdomen and Pelvis CTs
    • Extremity, Upper (Arm) CTs
    • Extremity, Lower (Leg) CTs
    • Spine CTs
    • Whole Body CTs
    • MRIs
    • Ultrasound
    • Veterinary/Animals
    • Other

Product Groups

  • Premium Services
  • Physical Print Quotes

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Found 7 results

  1. Version 1.0.0

    485 downloads

    This Brain model was created from a high resolution MRI scan. The model includes the cerebrum. The cerebellum and brain stem are not depicted. The model has been made hollow, with 4 mm wall thickness to save on material when 3D printing. The model is full-size. It has been successfully printed at full size on an Ultimaker 3 Extended printer, and at 95% size on a Formlabs Form 2 printer. Technical parameters: Vertices: 350725 Triangles: 701950 Size: 17.9 x 13.4 x 11.5 cm

    Free

  2. Version

    221 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file and medical model of the lumbar spine was generated from real CT scan data and is thus anatomically accurate as it comes from a real person. It shows the detailed anatomy of the lumbar (lower back) spine, including the vertebral bodies, facets, neural foramina and spinous proceses. Download is free for registered members. This file was originally created by Dr. Bruno Gobbato, who has graciously given permission to share it here on Embodi3D. Modifications were made by Dr. Mike to make it suitable for 3D printing. The file(s) are distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license. It can't be used for commercial purposes. If you would like to use it for commercial purposes, please contact the authors. Technical specs: File format: STL Manifold mesh: Yes Triangles: 509136

    Free

  3. Please note that any references to “Imag3D” in this tutorial should be replaced with “democratiz3D” In this tutorial we will discuss how to share, sell, organize, and reprocess 3D printable medical models you make using the free online democratiz3D service from embodi3D. democratiz3D is a powerful tool that automatically converts a medical CT scan into a 3D printable file in minutes with minimal user input. It is no longer necessary to master complicated desktop software and spend hours manually segmenting to create a 3D printable model. Learn how to make high quality medical 3D models with democratiz3D by following my introductory guide to creating medical 3D printing files and my more advanced 3D printing file processing tutorial. Once you create your medical masterpiece, you can share, sell, organize, or tweak your model to make it perfect. This tutorial will show you how. Resubmit your CT Scan for Reprocessing into Bone STL If you are trying to learn the basics of how to convert CT scans into 3D printable STL models, please see my earlier tutorials on basic creation of 3D printable models and more advanced multiprocessing. If you are not 100% satisfied with the quality of your STL model, you can resubmit the input scan file for repeat processing. To do this, go to the page for your input NRRD file. IMPORTANT: this is the NRRD file you originally uploaded to the website, NOT the STL file that was generated for you by the online service. Since both the original NRRD file and the processed STL file have similar titles, you can tell the difference by noting that the NRRD file you uploaded won't have any thumbnails, Figure 1. In most cases, the processed file will have the word "processed" appended to the file name. Figure 1: Choose the original NRRD file, not the generated STL file. You can find your files underneath your profile, as shown in Figure 2. That will show you your most recent activity, including recently uploaded files. Figure 2: Finding your files under your profile. If you uploaded the file long ago or contribute a lot of content to the site, your uploaded NRRD file may not be among the first content item shown. You can search specifically for your files by clicking on See My Activity under your Profile, and selecting Files from the left hand now bar, as shown in Figures 3 and 4. Figure 3: Showing all your activity. Figure 4: Showing the files you own. Once you have found your original NRRD file, open the file page and select File Actions on the lower left-hand corner, as shown in Figure 5. Choose Edit Details as shown in Figure 6. Figure 5: File Actions – start making changes to your file Figure 6: Edit Details Scroll down until you reach the democratiz3D Processing section. Make sure that the democratiz3D Processing slider is turned ON. Then, make whatever adjustments you want to the processing parameters Threshold and Quality, as shown in Figure 7. Threshold is the value in Hounsfield units to use when performing the initial segmentation. Quality is a measure of the number of polygons in the output mesh. Low quality is quick to process and generates a small output file. Low quality is suitable for small and geometrically simple structures, such as a patella or single bone. High quality takes longer to process and produces a very large output file, sometimes with millions of polygons. This is useful for very large structures or complex anatomy, such as a model of an entire spine where you wish to capture every crack and crevice of the spine. Medium quality is a good balance and suitable in most cases. Figure 7: Changing the processing parameters. When you're happy with your parameter choices, click Save. The file will now be submitted for reprocessing. In 5 to 15 minutes you should receive an email saying that your file is ready. From this NRRD file, an entirely new STL file will be created using your updated parameters and saved under your account. Sharing your 3D Printing File on embodi3D.com Sharing your file with the embodi3D community is easy. You can quickly share the file by toggling the privacy setting on the file page underneath the File Information box on the lower right, as shown in Figure 8. If this setting says "Shared," then your file is visible and available for download by registered members of the community. If you wish to have more detailed control over how your file is shared, you can edit your file details by clicking on the File Actions button on the lower left-hand side of the file page, also shown in Figure 8. Click on the Edit Details menu item. This will bring you to the file editing page which will allow you to change the Privacy setting (shared versus private), License Type (several Creative Commons and a generic paid file license are available), and file Type (free versus paid). These are shown in detail in Figure 9. Click Save to save your settings. Figure 8: Quick sharing your file, and the File Actions button Figure 9: Setting the file type, privacy, and license type for your file. Sell your Biomedical 3D Printing File and Generate Income If you would like to sell your file and charge a fee for each download, you may do so by making your file a Paid File. If you have a specialized model that there is some demand for, you can generate income by selling your file in the marketplace. From the Edit Details page under File Actions, as shown in Figure 8, scroll down until you see Type. Choose Paid for the Type. Choose the price you wish to sell your file for in the Price field. This is in US dollars. Buyers will use PayPal to purchase the file where they can pay with Paypal funds or credit card. Make sure that the privacy setting is set to Shared. If you list your file for sale but keep it private and invisible to members, you won't sell anything. Finally, make sure you choose an appropriate license for users who will download your file. The General Paid File License is appropriate and most instances, but you have the option to include a customized license if you wish. This is shown in Figure 10. Figure 10: Configuring settings to sell your file The General Paid File License contains provisions appropriate for most sellers. It tells the purchaser of your file that they can download your file and create a single 3D print, but they can't resell your file or make more than one print without paying you additional license fees. All purchasers must agree to the license prior to download. If you wish to have your own customized license terms, you can select customized license and specify your terms in the description of the file. Organize your file by moving it to a new category If you share your file, you should move the file into an appropriate file category to allow people to find it easily. This is quite simple to do. From the file page, select File Actions and choose the Move item, as shown in Figure 11. You will be able to choose any of the file categories. Choose the one that best fits your particular file. Figure 11: Moving your file to a new category. That's it! Now you can share your amazing 3D printable medical models with the world.
  4. In this tutorial we will learn how to easily create a 3D printable dental, orthodontic, or maxillofacial bone model quickly and easily using the free democratiz3D® file conversion service on the embodi3D.com website. Creating the 3D printable dental model takes about 10 minutes and requires no prior experience or specialized knowledge. Dental 3D printing is one of the many uses for democratiz3D. You can 3D print teeth, braces, dental implants and so much more. Step 1: Download the CT scan file for dental 3D printing. Go to the navigation bar on the embodi3D.com website and click on the Download menu. This is shown in Figure 1. Figure 1: The Download menu This will take you to the download section of the website, which has a very large and extensive library of 3D printable anatomy files and source medical scan files. Look for the category along the right side of the page that says Medical Scan Files. Click on the section within that that says Dental, Orthodontic, Maxillofacial, as shown in Figure 2. Figure 2: Viewing the medical scan library on the embodi3D website This section contains anonymized CT scans of the teeth and face. Many of the scans in this section are perfect for 3D printing dental models. For this tutorial we will use the file openbiteupdated by member gcross, although you can use any source CT scan. This particular scan is a good one to choose because the patient does not have metallic fillings which can create streak artifact which can lower the quality of the model. Click on the link below to go to the file download page. Step 2: Preview the Dental CT scan file. Once you've downloaded the file you can inspect the CT scan using 3D Slicer. If you don't know about 3D Slicer, it is a free open source medical image viewing software package that can be downloaded from slicer.org. Once you have installed and opened Slicer, you can drag-and-drop the downloaded NRRD file onto the slicer window and it will open for you to view. You can see as shown in Figure 3 that the file appears to be quite good, without any dental fillings that cause streak artifact. Figure 3: Viewing the dental CT scan in Slicer. Step 3: Upload your dental CT scan NRRD file to the democratiz3D online service. Now that we are happy with our NRRD source file, we can upload it to the democratiz3D service for conversion into a 3D printable STL file. On the embodi3D website click on the democratiz3D navigation menu and Launch App, as shown in Figure 4. Figure 4: Launching the democratiz3D service. Once the online application opens, you will be asked to drag-and-drop your file onto the webpage. Go ahead and do this. Make sure that the file you are adding is an NRRD file and corresponds to a dental CT scan. An MRI will not work. This is shown in Figure 5. Figure 5: Dragging and dropping the CT scan NRRD file onto the democratiz3D application page. Step 4: Fill in basic information about your uploaded scan and generated model file While the file is uploading you can begin to fill out some of the required form fields. There are two main sections to the form. The section labeled 3 pertains to the file currently being uploaded, the NRRD file. Section 4 pertains to the generated STL file that democratiz3D will create. In Section 3 fill out a filename and a short description of your uploaded NRRD file. Specify whether you want the file to be private or shared, and whether this is a free file or a paid file that you wish to sell. You must choose a license type, although this is only really applicable if your file is shared as if it is private nobody will be able to download it. This portion of the form is shown in Figure 6. Figure 6: Filling out the submission form, part 1. Enter in information related to the uploaded NRRD file. Next proceed to section 4, the portion of the form related to the file you wish to generate. Make sure that democratiz3D processing is turned on and the slider shows green. Choose the appropriate operation. For creation of dental files, the best operation is "CT NRRD to Bone STL Detailed." This takes a CT scan in NRRD file format and converts it to a bone STL file using maximum detail. Leave the threshold at the default value of 150. Set quality to high. Make sure that you specify whether you want the file to be private or shared, and free versus paid. Make sure you specify file license. The steps are shown in Figure 7. Figure 7: Filling out the submission form, part 2. Enter in information related to the generated STL file. Make sure you check the checkbox that states you agree to the terms of use, and click the submit button. Your file will now start processing. In approximately 10 minutes or so you should receive an email stating that the file has been processed and your newly created 3D printable STL model is ready for download. The email should contain a link that will take you to your file download page, which should look something like the page in Figure 8. There should be several thumbnails which show you what the model looks like. To download the file click on the Download button. Figure 8: The file download page for your newly created dental model. Step 5: Check your dental STL file for errors and send it to your dental 3D printer! Once you have downloaded the STL file open it in Meshmixer. Meshmixer is a free 3D software program available from meshmixer.com that has many handy 3D printing related features. The democratized service is a good job of creating error-free files, but occasionally a few errors will sneak through, which can be easily fixed and Meshmixer. Click on the analysis button and then select Inspector as shown in Figure 9. Click on the Auto Repair All button and any minor defects that are remaining will be automatically fixed. Make sure to save your repaired and finalized 3D printable model by clicking on the menu File -> Export. You can now send your STL file to the 3D printer of your choice. Here is an example of the model when printed on a Form 1+ using white resin. You can see that the level of detail is very good. Formlabs has several examples of 3d printing teeth and other dental applications on their website. Thank you very much. I hope this tutorial was helpful. If you are not already a member, please consider joining the embodi3D community of medical 3D printing enthusiasts. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to post them below.
  5. Version 1.0.0

    15 downloads

    This is the normal right foot and ankle muscle model of a 56-year-old male with right anterior thigh pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The primary motions of the ankle are dorsiflexion, plantarflexion, inversion, and eversion. However, with the addition of midfoot motion (adduction, and abduction), the foot may supinate (inversion and adduction) or pronate (eversion and abduction). In order to accomplish these motions, muscles outside of the foot (extrinsic) and muscles within the foot (intrinsic) attach throughout the foot, crossing one or more joints. Laterally, the peroneus brevis and tertius attach on the proximal fifth metatarsal to evert the foot. The peroneus longus courses under the cuboid to attach on the plantar surface of the first metatarsal, acting as the primary plantarflexor of the first ray and, secondarily, the foot. Together, these muscles also assist in stabilizing the ankle for patients with deficient lateral ankle ligaments from chronic sprains. Medially, the posterior tibialis inserts on the plantar aspect of the navicular cuneiforms and metatarsal bases, acting primarily to invert the foot and secondarily to plantarflex the foot. The flexor hallucis longus inserts on the base of the distal phalanx of the great toe to plantarflex the great toe, and the flexor digitorum inserts on the bases of the distal phalanges of the lesser four toes, acting to plantarflex the toes. The gastrocnemius inserts on the calcaneus as the Achilles tendon and plantarflexes the foot. Anteriorly, the tibialis anterior inserts on the dorsal medial cuneiform and plantar aspect of the first metatarsal base as the primary ankle dorsiflexor and secondary inverter. The Extensor hallucis longus and extensor digitorum longus insert on the dorsal aspect of the base of the distal phalanges to dorsiflex the great toe and lesser toes, respectively. This model was created from the file STS_014.

    Free

  6. The Most Advanced Vascular Training Models for Physicians Embodi3D has created a line of super-accurate 3D printed vascular models for physician and medical professional advanced training. Created by a board-certified physician who performs vascular procedures daily, these models were created for maximum procedural realism while being more practical and less expensive than conventional animal labs or silicone tube models. Physician specialists who utilize these models include vascular surgeons, cardiologists, and radiologists. Numerous medical device companies use these models to teach and demonstrate their devices under realistic circumstances. Hospitals and medical schools use them to teach residents, fellows and medical students how to perform vascular procedures. To view our full product catalog with updated information please see the Vascular Training Models page. You will learn about the models shown on this page and many more. If you are interested in these training models, please Contact us. IVC Filter - Whole Body Venous Training Model The whole body venous medical training model includes all the major venous structures in the human body from the right jugular vein of the neck to the right and left common femoral veins at the level of the hips. The whole body venous model allows for the education and training in a variety of IVC filter related procedures. The model was created from a real CT scan so the vessel positions, diameters, and angles are all real. Entry points are present at the right jugular vein and brachiocephalic vein for upper body access, and the bilateral common femoral veins for lower body access. Attachments are present to make placement of a real vascular sheath easy. The model can be used to teach or practice the following procedures: IVC filter placement, jugular or femoral approach Common iliac filter placement, jugular or femoral approach IVC filter retrieval Venous stenting IVC and iliac vein thrombectomy or thrombolysis Venous embolization Hepatic vein cannulation The model can be used to illustrate specific devices for the procedures listed above and is used by medical device companies to demonstrate and teach the use of their products. The IVC model comes in a portable carrying case and is easily transportable. It assembles and disassembles in less than 20 seconds. Caption: An attendee of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting deploying an IVC filter in the IVC filter training model. Models are commonly used at medical trade shows to allow attendees to quickly get hands-on experience with medical equipment. If you are interested in the IVC Filter - whole body venous training model, please contact us. Abdomen and Pelvis Arterial Embolization and Stenting Medical Model The abdomen and pelvis embolization and stenting model has detailed arterial anatomy generated from a real CT scan, so the exact vessel shapes, diameters, and angles are all real. Numerous detailed vessel branches are included for maximum realism and for practicing extremely fine catheterization. For example, the right, middle, and left hepatic arteries are included, which are only accessible after four levels of branching (Aorta -> Celiac artery -> Common hepatic artery -> Proper hepatic artery -> Right, middle, and left hepatic arteries). Vascular sheath attachment points are present at the right and left common femoral arteries, as they would be during a real procedure. This provides an unparalleled level of realism for training in an in vitro model. It is a revolutionary training tool for interventional radiologists, cardiologists, and vascular surgeons. It is commonly used at professional training sessions, trade shows and conventions, in-hospital training sessions, and at medical schools for teaching residents and fellows. Medical device companies use the model to demonstrate and teach the use of their microcatheter, wire, and embolization products to physicians. This medical model can be used to teach or practice the following procedures: Aneurysm embolization Stent assisted embolization Balloon assisted embolization Splenic artery embolization Gastroduodenal artery embolization Yttrium-90 radioembolization mapping Yttrium-90 radioembolization treatment Hepatic chemoembolization Angiography for G.I. bleeding Renal artery angiography Renal artery stenting Pelvic angiography and embolization for trauma Internal iliac artery embolization Internal iliac artery stent-grafting Abdominal aorta stent-grafting Arteries Included: Abdominal aorta Common iliac arteries Internal and external iliac arteries Common femoral arteries Celiac artery and branches Splenic artery Left gastric artery Common hepatic artery, left, middle, and right hepatic arteries Gastroduodenal artery Superior mesenteric artery and branches Inferior mesenteric artery and branches Renal arteries Aneurysms included: Splenic artery, proximal, 25 mm berry aneurysm, 10 mm neck Splenic artery, distal, 20 mm berry aneurysm, 7.5 mm neck Right renal, 10 mm berry aneurysm, 8 mm neck Left renal, inferior, 5 mm berry aneurysm, 3.5 mm neck Left iliac artery, fusiform aneurysm, 33 mm x 23 mm Arterial Stenoses: Left renal, accessory branch, stenosis, 2mm The model assembles and disassembles in less than 20 seconds. It comes with its own durable and customized carrying case for safe and easy transport Thank you for your interest in Embodi3D's advanced vascular training models. If you have any additional questions about our existing training models, or are interested in having us create a new training model for your special need, please contact us.
  7. Version

    120 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file of the splenic artery shows three aneurysms. This model was created from a CT scan and used in pre-surgical testing. It accompanies the blog article Saving a Spleen with 3D Printing: Pre-Surgical Planning with Medical Models make "Impossible" Surgeries Possible. The file is distributed under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs license. If you wish to use this file for commercial purposes, please contact the author.

    Free

×