Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'bone model'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Blogs

  • Embodi3d Test Blog
  • 3D Printing in Medicine
  • Cool Medical 3D-Printing
  • 3D Bio Printing by Paige Anne Carter
  • SSchoppert's Blog
  • Additive Manufacturing in Medicine
  • biomedical 3D printing
  • Bryce's Blog
  • Chris Leggett
  • 3D Models Help Improve Surgical Precision, Reduce Operating Time
  • Desktop 3D Printing in Medical Imaging
  • 3D Printing: Radiology corner
  • The Embodi3D.com Blog
  • descobar3d's Blog
  • 3D Printing in Anthropology
  • Learn to 3D Print: Basic Tools from software to printers
  • 3D printing for bio-medicine
  • 3D Biomedical Printing - by Jacob M.
  • Valchanov's Blog
  • Deirdre_Manion-Fischer's Blog
  • Matt Johnson's Biomedical 3D Printing Blog
  • Devarsh Vyas's Biomedical 3D Printing Blogs
  • Devarsh Vyas's Biomedical 3D Printing Blogs
  • Mike at Medical Models
  • TOP TEN THE MOST DOWNLOADED EMBODI3D

Forums

  • Biomedical 3D Printing
    • Hardware and 3D Printers
    • democratiz3D®
    • Software
    • Clinical applications
    • 3D Printable Models
    • Medical Imaging: CT, MRI, US
    • Science and Research
    • News and Trending Topics
    • Education, Conferences, Meetings, Events
    • Member Lounge (new!)
    • General
  • Classifieds, Goods and Services
    • General Classifieds - members post free
    • Services needed
    • Services offered
    • Stuff for sale/needed
    • Post a Job
    • Looking for work - visible only to members

Categories

  • democratiz3D® Processing
  • Bones
    • Skull and Head
    • Dental, Orthodontic, Maxillofacial
    • Spine and Pelvis
    • Extremity, Upper (Arm)
    • Extremity, Lower (Leg)
    • Thorax and Ribs
    • Whole body
    • Skeletal tumors, fractures and bony pathology
  • Muscles
    • Head and neck muscles
    • Extremity, Lower (Leg) Muscles
    • Extremity, Upper (Arm) Muscles
    • Thorax and Ribs Muscles
    • Abdomen and Pelvis muscles
    • Whole body Muscles
    • Muscular tumors and sarcomas
  • Cardiac and Vascular
    • Heart
    • Congenital Heart Defects
    • Aorta
    • Mesenteric and abdominal arteries
    • Veins
  • Organs of the Body
    • Brain and nervous system
    • Kidneys
    • Lungs
    • Liver
    • Other organs
  • Skin
  • Veterinary
    • Dogs
    • Cats
    • Other
  • Science and Research
    • Paleontology
    • Anthropology
    • Misc Research
  • Miscellaneous
    • Formlabs
  • Medical CT Scan Files
    • Skull, Head, and Neck CTs
    • Dental, Orthodontic, Maxillofacial CTs
    • Thorax and Ribs CTs
    • Abdomen and Pelvis CTs
    • Extremity, Upper (Arm) CTs
    • Extremity, Lower (Leg) CTs
    • Spine CTs
    • Whole Body CTs
    • MRIs
    • Ultrasound
    • Veterinary/Animals
    • Other

Product Groups

  • Premium Services
  • Physical Print Quotes

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Found 5 results

  1. Please note that any references to “Imag3D” in this tutorial should be replaced with “democratiz3D” In this tutorial we will discuss how to share, sell, organize, and reprocess 3D printable medical models you make using the free online democratiz3D service from embodi3D. democratiz3D is a powerful tool that automatically converts a medical CT scan into a 3D printable file in minutes with minimal user input. It is no longer necessary to master complicated desktop software and spend hours manually segmenting to create a 3D printable model. Learn how to make high quality medical 3D models with democratiz3D by following my introductory guide to creating medical 3D printing files and my more advanced 3D printing file processing tutorial. Once you create your medical masterpiece, you can share, sell, organize, or tweak your model to make it perfect. This tutorial will show you how. Resubmit your CT Scan for Reprocessing into Bone STL If you are trying to learn the basics of how to convert CT scans into 3D printable STL models, please see my earlier tutorials on basic creation of 3D printable models and more advanced multiprocessing. If you are not 100% satisfied with the quality of your STL model, you can resubmit the input scan file for repeat processing. To do this, go to the page for your input NRRD file. IMPORTANT: this is the NRRD file you originally uploaded to the website, NOT the STL file that was generated for you by the online service. Since both the original NRRD file and the processed STL file have similar titles, you can tell the difference by noting that the NRRD file you uploaded won't have any thumbnails, Figure 1. In most cases, the processed file will have the word "processed" appended to the file name. Figure 1: Choose the original NRRD file, not the generated STL file. You can find your files underneath your profile, as shown in Figure 2. That will show you your most recent activity, including recently uploaded files. Figure 2: Finding your files under your profile. If you uploaded the file long ago or contribute a lot of content to the site, your uploaded NRRD file may not be among the first content item shown. You can search specifically for your files by clicking on See My Activity under your Profile, and selecting Files from the left hand now bar, as shown in Figures 3 and 4. Figure 3: Showing all your activity. Figure 4: Showing the files you own. Once you have found your original NRRD file, open the file page and select File Actions on the lower left-hand corner, as shown in Figure 5. Choose Edit Details as shown in Figure 6. Figure 5: File Actions – start making changes to your file Figure 6: Edit Details Scroll down until you reach the democratiz3D Processing section. Make sure that the democratiz3D Processing slider is turned ON. Then, make whatever adjustments you want to the processing parameters Threshold and Quality, as shown in Figure 7. Threshold is the value in Hounsfield units to use when performing the initial segmentation. Quality is a measure of the number of polygons in the output mesh. Low quality is quick to process and generates a small output file. Low quality is suitable for small and geometrically simple structures, such as a patella or single bone. High quality takes longer to process and produces a very large output file, sometimes with millions of polygons. This is useful for very large structures or complex anatomy, such as a model of an entire spine where you wish to capture every crack and crevice of the spine. Medium quality is a good balance and suitable in most cases. Figure 7: Changing the processing parameters. When you're happy with your parameter choices, click Save. The file will now be submitted for reprocessing. In 5 to 15 minutes you should receive an email saying that your file is ready. From this NRRD file, an entirely new STL file will be created using your updated parameters and saved under your account. Sharing your 3D Printing File on embodi3D.com Sharing your file with the embodi3D community is easy. You can quickly share the file by toggling the privacy setting on the file page underneath the File Information box on the lower right, as shown in Figure 8. If this setting says "Shared," then your file is visible and available for download by registered members of the community. If you wish to have more detailed control over how your file is shared, you can edit your file details by clicking on the File Actions button on the lower left-hand side of the file page, also shown in Figure 8. Click on the Edit Details menu item. This will bring you to the file editing page which will allow you to change the Privacy setting (shared versus private), License Type (several Creative Commons and a generic paid file license are available), and file Type (free versus paid). These are shown in detail in Figure 9. Click Save to save your settings. Figure 8: Quick sharing your file, and the File Actions button Figure 9: Setting the file type, privacy, and license type for your file. Sell your Biomedical 3D Printing File and Generate Income If you would like to sell your file and charge a fee for each download, you may do so by making your file a Paid File. If you have a specialized model that there is some demand for, you can generate income by selling your file in the marketplace. From the Edit Details page under File Actions, as shown in Figure 8, scroll down until you see Type. Choose Paid for the Type. Choose the price you wish to sell your file for in the Price field. This is in US dollars. Buyers will use PayPal to purchase the file where they can pay with Paypal funds or credit card. Make sure that the privacy setting is set to Shared. If you list your file for sale but keep it private and invisible to members, you won't sell anything. Finally, make sure you choose an appropriate license for users who will download your file. The General Paid File License is appropriate and most instances, but you have the option to include a customized license if you wish. This is shown in Figure 10. Figure 10: Configuring settings to sell your file The General Paid File License contains provisions appropriate for most sellers. It tells the purchaser of your file that they can download your file and create a single 3D print, but they can't resell your file or make more than one print without paying you additional license fees. All purchasers must agree to the license prior to download. If you wish to have your own customized license terms, you can select customized license and specify your terms in the description of the file. Organize your file by moving it to a new category If you share your file, you should move the file into an appropriate file category to allow people to find it easily. This is quite simple to do. From the file page, select File Actions and choose the Move item, as shown in Figure 11. You will be able to choose any of the file categories. Choose the one that best fits your particular file. Figure 11: Moving your file to a new category. That's it! Now you can share your amazing 3D printable medical models with the world.
  2. Version 1.0.0

    34 downloads

    This is the normal left knee bone model of a 56 year old male with right anterior thigh pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The knee is composed of 3 separate joints: two hinge joints (medial and lateral femorotibial joints), and one sellar, or gliding, joint (the patellofemoral joint). These also compose the three compartments of the knee: medial, lateral, and patellofemoral. Although the knee is thought of as a hinge joint, it actually has 6 degrees of motion: extension/flexion, internal/external rotation, varus/valgus, anterior/posterior translation, medial/lateral translation, and compression/distraction. In order to provide stability to this inherently unstable knee, static and dynamic stabilizers surround the knee, including muscles and ligaments. The proximal tibia includes the medial plateau (which is concave) and the lateral plateau (which is convex). The Proximal tibia has a 7-10 degree posterior slope. The tibial tuberosity is located on the anterior proximal tibia, which is where the patellar tendon attaches. On the anteromedial surface of the tibia is Gerdy's tubercle, where the sartorius, gracilis, and semitendinosus attach. The proximal fibula is the attachment for the posterolateral corner structures of the knee joint. The peroneal nerve wraps around the fibular neck. This model was created from the file STS_014.

    Free

  3. Version 1.0.0

    6 downloads

    This is the normal left leg bone model (including foot) of a 56 year old male with right anterior thigh pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The leg includes the area between the knee and the ankle and houses the tibia and fibula. The proximal tibia includes the medial plateau (which is concave) and the lateral plateau (which is convex). The Proximal tibia has a 7-10 degree posterior slope. The tibial tuberosity is located on the anterior proximal tibia, which is where the patellar tendon attaches. On the anteromedial surface of the tibia is Gerdy's tubercle, where the sartorius, gracilis, and semitendinosus attach. The distal tibia creates the superior and medial (plafond and medial malleolus) of the ankle joint. The proximal fibula is the attachment for the posterolateral corner structures of the knee joint. The peroneal nerve wraps around the fibular neck. The distal fibula is the lateral malleolus and a common site for ankle fractures. This model was created from the file STS_014.

    Free

  4. Version 1.0.0

    4 downloads

    This is the normal right leg bone model (including foot) of a 56 year old male with right anterior thigh pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The leg includes the area between the knee and the ankle and houses the tibia and fibula. The proximal tibia includes the medial plateau (which is concave) and the lateral plateau (which is convex). The Proximal tibia has a 7-10 degree posterior slope. The tibial tuberosity is located on the anterior proximal tibia, which is where the patellar tendon attaches. On the anteromedial surface of the tibia is Gerdy's tubercle, where the sartorius, gracilis, and semitendinosus attach. The distal tibia creates the superior and medial (plafond and medial malleolus) of the ankle joint. The proximal fibula is the attachment for the posterolateral corner structures of the knee joint. The peroneal nerve wraps around the fibular neck. The distal fibula is the lateral malleolus and a common site for ankle fractures. This model was created from the file STS_014.

    Free

  5. Version 1.0.0

    15 downloads

    This image is the left thigh bone rendering of an 82 year old male with a dedifferentiated liposarcoma in the anterior compartment of the left thigh. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. Liposarcomas are the second most common soft tissue sarcoma in adults, occurring more commonly in males between the ages of 50 and 80 years old. They present as a slow growing, painless mass typically located in the extremities, with the thigh being the most common location. Multiple variants of liposarcomas exist, but the dedifferentiated type is a high-grade sarcoma. Dedifferentiated liposarcomas are typically located adjacent to a well-differentiated lipomatous lesion. The incidence of pulmonary metastasis increases with grade. Therefore, work up of the lesion consists of MRI, biopsy through the area of future resection, CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis to rule out metastases. Treatment consists of radiation and wide surgical resection but chemotherapy agents are being developed to target chromosomal abnormalities associated with certain well-differentiated and dedifferentiated liposarcomas. This patient received radiation and resection of the tumor and has not had a metastasis or recurrence in 4.5 years. This image came from the file STS_013.

    Free

×