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Found 29 results

  1. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    The lumbar spine represents the mid-lower segment of the vertebral column and is composed of five adjacent vertebrae. They are anteriorly convex to form a lumbar lordosis. The lumbar spine facet joints allows limited movements and rotation. The sacrum is the lower most segment of the vertebral column and also forms the posterior wall of the bony pelvis. The sacrum is formed by five fused sacral vertebrae. This model also shows the sacroiliac joints, parts of the pubis and some of the contrast media within the colon. This 3D model was created from the file STS_044. The source CT scan used to create this model can be found here.

    Free

  2. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    Dog Spine and Scapulas osteossarcomma

    Free

  3. Version 1.0.0

    5 downloads

    The cervical spine is the upper most spines forming the spinal column, extending from the skull base to the level of the thoracic vertebra (the spines with attached ribs). The cervical spines are usually seven and the main function is to support the skull and to protect the spinal cord. Apart from the first cervical vertebra (atlas) and the second vertebra (axis), the other vertebral bodies share a general anatomical appearance: Oval shaped vertebral bodies with wide vertebral arch, large vertebral foramina and long spinous processes. This particular model shows parts of the mandible as well as the hyoid bone. This 3D model was created from the file STS_044. The source scan used to create this file can be found here.

    Free

  4. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    CT Scans of back with SPondylolysis - stress fracture, here in the L4 L5

    Free

  5. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    this is to test

    Free

  6. Version 1.0.0

    21 downloads

    A thoracic vertebra generated by using the contouring tools in 3DSlicer and smoothed in Blender.

    Free

  7. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    The T12 and L1 vertebrae.

    Free

  8. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    NRD - 3D printable image - STL

    Free

  9. Our company is starting a METAL 3D printing facility in Pune, INDIA. we are building a world class facility as per ISO 13485 and FDA . we have begun the process of getting these certifications too. we are looking to working with biomedical engineers, medical device engineers, doctors, service providers,hospitals and all 3d companies. we could also be a back end facility for biomedical designers, anatomical model mfg , plastic 3d printers, service providers, medical device distributors etc as they could bring their metal 3d requirement to us. however we would be up and ready in the next 2/ 3 months.
  10. Version 1.0.0

    48 downloads

    Thoracic vertebrae compose the middle portion of the vertebral column.They are 12 in number and their size is intermediate between the cervical and the lumbar spine. They increase gradually in size as we go down the vertebral column. They are characterized by the presence of facets for articulation with the corresponding ribs and they are of limited flexibility compared to the cervical and the lumbar regions, they also have thinner intervetebral discs and a narrower spinal canal. This is a 3D printable medical file converted from a CT scan DICOM dataset

    Free

  11. Please note that any references to “Imag3D” in this tutorial has been replaced with “democratiz3D” In this tutorial you will learn how to create multiple 3D printable bone models simultaneously using the free online CT scan to bone STL converter, democratiz3D. We will use the free desktop program Slicer to convert our CT scan in DICOM format to NRRD format. We will also make a small section of the CT scan into its own NRRD file to create a second stand-alone model. The NRRD files will then be uploaded to the free democratiz3D online service to be converted into 3D printable STL models. If you haven't already, please see the tutorial A Ridiculously Easy Way to Convert CT Scans to 3D Printable Bone STL Models for Free in Minutes, which provides a good overview of the democratiz3D service. You should download the file pack that accompanies this tutorial. This contains an anonymized DICOM data set that will allow you to follow along with the tutorial. >>> DOWNLOAD THE TUTORIAL FILE PACK <<< Step 1: Register for an Embodi3D account If you haven't already done so, you'll need to register for an embodi3D account. Registration is free and only takes a minute. Once you are registered you'll receive a confirmatory email that verifies you are the owner of the registered email account. Click the link in the email to activate your account. The democratiz3D service will use this email account to send you notifications when your files are ready for download. Step 2: Create NRRD Files from DICOM with Slicer Open Slicer, which can be downloaded for free from www.slicer.org. Take the folder that contains your DICOM scan files and drag and drop it onto the slicer window, as shown in Figure 1. If you downloaded the tutorial file pack, a complete DICOM data set is included. Click OK when asked to load the study into the DICOM database. Click Copy when asked if you want to copy the images into the local database directory. Remember, this only works with CT scans. MRIs cannot be converted at this time. Figure 1: Dragging and dropping the DICOM folder onto the Slicer application. This will load the CT scan. A NRRD file that encompasses the entire scan can easily be created by clicking the save button at this point. Before we do that however, we are going to create a second NRRD file that only contains the lumbar spine, which will allow us to create a second 3D printable bone model of the lumbar spine. Open the CT scan by clicking on the Show DICOM Browser button, selecting the scan and series within the scan, and clicking the Load button. The CT scan will then load within the multipanel viewer. From the drop-down menu at the top left of the Slicer window, select All Modules and then Crop Volume, as shown in Figure 2. You will now want to create a Region Of Interest (ROI) to encompass the smaller volume we want to make. Turn on the ROI visibility button and then under the Input ROI drop-down menu, select "Create new AnnotationROI," As shown in Figure 3. Figure 2: Choosing the Crop Volume module Figure 3: Turn on ROI visibility and Create a new AnnotationROI under the Input ROI drop-down menu. A small cube will then be displayed in the blue volume window. This represents the sub volume that will be made. In its default position, the cube may not overlay the body, and may need to be dragged downward. Grab a control point on the cube and drag it downward (inferiorly) as shown in Figure 4. Figure 4: Grab the sub volume ROI and drag it downwards until it overlaps with the body. Next, use the control points on the volume box to position the volume box over the portion of the scan you wish to be included in the small 3D printable model, as shown in Figure 5. Figure 5: Adjusting the control points on the crop volume box. Once you have the box position where you want it, initiate the volume crop by clicking the Crop! button, as shown in Figure 6. Figure 6: The Crop! button You have now have two scan volumes that can be 3D printed. The first is the entire scan, and the second is the smaller sub volume that contains only the lumbar spine. We are now going to save those individual volumes as NRRD files. Click the Save button in the upper left-hand corner. In the Save Scene window, uncheck all items that do not have NRRD as the file format, as shown in Figure 7. Only NRRD file should be checked. Be sure to specify the directory that you want each file to be saved in. Figure 7: The Save Scene window Your NRRD files should now be saved in the directory you specified. Step 3: Upload your NRRD files and Convert to STL Files Using the Free democratiz3D Service Launch your web browser and go to www.embodi3d.com. If you haven't already register for a account. Registration is free and only takes a minute. Click on the democratiz3D navigation item and select Launch App, as shown in Figure 8. Figure 8: launching the democratiz3D application. Drag-and-drop both of your NRRD files onto the upload panel. Fill in the required fields, including a title, short description, privacy setting (private versus shared), and license type. You must agree to the terms of use. Please note that even though license type is a required field, it only matters if the file is shared. If you keep the file private and thus not available to other members on the site, they will not see it nor be able to download it. Be sure to turn on the democratiz3D Processing slider! If you don't turn this on your file will not be processed but will just be saved in your account on the website. It should be green when turned on. Once you turn on democratiz3D Processing, you'll be presented with some basic processing options, as shown in Figure 9. Leave the default operation as "CT NRRD to Bone STL," which is the operation that creates a basic bone model from a CT scan in NRRD format. Threshold is the Hounsfield attenuation to use for selecting the bones. The default value of 150 is good for most applications, but if you have a specialized model you wish to create, you can adjust this value. Quality denotes the number of polygons in your output file. High-quality may take longer to process and produce larger files. These are more appropriate for very large or detailed structures, such as an entire spinal column. Low quality is best for small structures that are geometrically simple, such as a patella. Medium quality is balanced, and is appropriate for most circumstances. Figure 9: The democratiz3D File Processing Parameters. Once you are satisfied with your processing parameters, click submit. Both of your nrrd files will be processed in two separate bone STL files, as shown in Figure 10. The process takes 10 to 20 minutes and you will receive an email notifying you that your files are ready. Please note, the stl processing will finish first followed by the images. Click on the thumbnails for each model to access the file for download or click the title. Figure 10: Two files have been processed simultaneously and are ready for download Step 4: CT scan conversion is complete your STL bone model files are ready for 3D Printing That's it! Both of your bone models are ready for 3D printing. I hope you enjoyed this tutorial. Please use the democratiz3D service and SHARE the files you create with the community by changing their status from private or shared. Thank you very much and happy 3D printing!
  12. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    CT cat Spine

    Free

  13. Hello My recent anatomy projects forced me to start importing my 3d models into 3d pdf documents. So I'll share with you some of my findings. The positive things about 3d pdf's are: 1. You can import a big sized 3d model and compress it into a small 3d pdf. 40 Mb stl model is converted into 750 Kb pdf. 2. You can run the 3d pdf on every computer with the recent versions of Adobe Acrobat Reader. Which means literally EVERY computer. 3. You can rotate, pan, zoom in and zoom out 3d models in the 3d pdf. You can add some simple animations like spinning, sequence animations and explosion of multi component models. 4. You can add colors to the models and to create a 3d scene. 5. You can upload it on a website and it can be viewed in the browser (if Adobe Acrobat Reader is installed). The negative things are: 1. Adobe Reader is a buggy 3d viewer. If you import a big model (bigger than 50 Mb) and your computer is business class (core I3 or I5, 4 Gb ram, integrated video card), you'll experience some nasty lag and the animation will look terrible. On the same computer regular 3d viewer will do the trick much better. 2. You can experience some difficulties with multi component models. During the rotation, some of the components will disappear, others will change their color. Also the model navigation toolbar is somewhat hard to control. 3. The transparent and wireframe polygon are not as good as in the regular 3d viewers. The conclusion: If you want to demonstrate your models to a large audience, to sent it via email and to observe them on every computer, 3d pdf is your format. For a presentation it's better to use a regular 3d viewer, even the portable ones will do the trick. But if the performance is not the goal, 3d pdf's are a good alternative. Here is a model of atlas and axis as 3d pfg: https://www.dropbox.com/s/2gm7occq5ur50um/vertebra.pdf?dl=0 Best regards, Peter
  14. Version 1.0.0

    5 downloads

    CT of spine showing fractured T12.

    Free

  15. Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    Lumbar spine CT, approx one year after placing posterior instrumentation (titanium) from T11 to L1 following unstable fracture of T12.

    Free

  16. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    Spinal trauma Fracture L1

    Free

  17. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    Fractured L3

    Free

  18. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    Feline thorax CBCT

    Free

  19. Version 1.0.0

    Rib cage and spine of a small dog

    $2.00

  20. Role of 3D Printing in Scoliosis Correction Surgery Scoliosis is a medical condition in which a person's spine has a sideways curve. The curve is usually "S" or "C" shaped. Scoliosis occurs most often during the growth spurt just before puberty. In some cases, the person suffering from the disease can be left unable to stand up straight, to walk, or even, in the most severe cases, to breathe properly. In the most severe scoliosis cases, however, surgery is the only option. Back surgery is never a minor procedure, and scoliosis surgery is especially tricky, as it requires screws or wires to be placed throughout multiple vertebrae and then connected to stabilize the back Fig: Scoliosis Example 3D printing has done quite a bit to make scoliosis treatment less agonizing for even severe cases. Here is an over view of how 3D Printing is a complete package in diagnosing, treatment and rehabilitation for scoliosis patients. · 3D Printed Patient Specific Models for Pre-Surgical Planning Recognition of complex anatomical structures in scoliosis can sometimes be difficult to attain from simple 2D radio-graphic views. 3D models of patients’ anatomy facilitate this task and allow doctors to familiarize themselves with a specific patient. This approach proved to reduce drastically OT time, especially in complex scoliosis cases. Getting to know patients’ anatomy before entering an OT allows to plan the exact approach, helps to predict bottlenecks and even test procedures beforehand. Fig: Scoliosis Pre operative model to be 3D Printed. No standard models nor 2D images can replace 3D printing as the first do not represent the specific case in debate and the latter may hide important details, especially in the spatial relationship between structures. 3D prints may be as well used by a doctor to explain to a patient his or her condition. Offering a patient possibility to understand his case and procedure may be reassuring and produce better treatment outcome by reducing stress and insecurity. · 3D Printed Patient Specific Surgical Guides in Scoliosis Another recent advancement in the 3D Printing applications for spine surgeries are the 3D-printed Patient specific pedicle screw guides, realized in a customized manner with 3D printers. Their aim is to orient and guide in a precise fashion the placement of the screw in the pedicle. In complex scoliosis cases and revision surgeries it is very difficult to find the pedicle and the entry point for the screw guides. 3D Printing addresses this challenge and proves to be accurate, this level of accuracy is absolutely useful for patients with scoliosis, whose common anatomical landmarks can be in an abnormal position or might be not easily recognizable. Fig: Patient specific 3D printed guides. The guides involve surgical planning and software assisting surgical placement of pedicle screws designed specifically for a patients' unique anatomy. It is essentially a 3D printed surgical tool that fits the patient's unique anatomy. The 3D Printed surgical guides are printed in SLS and are bio compatible to be used on the patient's body. It is easy to see how these new customizable tools can greatly improve Scoliosis Surgery outcomes. These enhanced tools promise to improve patient satisfaction and physician performance, using the tailor-made patient-specific guides for the spine vertebrae utilizing proprietary CT scan algorithms and sophisticated 3-D medical printing technology. · 3D Printed Patient Specific Braces for Scoliosis Moderately severe scoliosis (30-45 degrees) in a child who is still growing may require bracing. The main goal of 3D Printed scoliosis brace is to combine fashion, design, and technology to create a brace far more appealing to patients, and, as a result, far more effective medically. Fig: 3D Printed scoliosis Brace. The 3D Printed patient specific brace represents a meaningful innovation in scoliosis treatment. Using advanced 3D scanning and printing technology, the Scoliosis Brace addresses the most common objections to traditional bracing. The 3D Printed braces are usually printed in SLS (Selective Laser Sintering) for its strength durability and aesthetic features along with bio compatibility. This is what happens when Design innovation meets Medical Innovation. To conclude the use of three dimensional printing in scoliosis surgeries has a wide range of applications from pre operative models to patient specific guides and orthotics proving to be a complete package in aiding Scoliosis surgeries and treatment.
  21. Version 1.0.0

    5 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file contains a model of the torso was derived from a real medical CT scan. It clearly shows the ribs, spine, pelvis, and bones of the shoulder. This model was created using the embodi3D free online 3D model creation service. STS007

    Free

  22. Version 1.0.0

    29 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file contains a model of the thoracic and lumbar spine was derived from a real medical CT scan of a 60 year old woman. It shows the spinal anatomy in great detail. This model was created using the embodi3D free online 3D model creation service. STS007

    Free

  23. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    Ct scan of the lower section of a spine

    Free

  24. Version 1.0.0

    6 downloads

    This 3D printable model of the spine was derived from the CT scan of a 83 year old female. It shows scoliosis of the thoracic spine. This model was created using the Imag3D 3D model creation service. STS_005 150

    Free

  25. Version 1.0.0

    This is a 3D printable STL model of the entire spinal column, including cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions derived from a CT scan. STS_003. This model was created with the Imag3D free online conversion tool.

    $9.99