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Found 7 results

  1. Physicians across the globe have relied on surgical interventions for centuries to treat complex illnesses and injuries. High quality surgical instruments have played an important role in their success. Nonetheless, healthcare professionals are constantly looking for tools that would improve patient outcomes and minimize the risk of unwanted complications. In recent times, three-dimensional (3D) medical printing and bioprinting technologies have allowed doctors and engineers to develop innovative tools that help perform invasive procedures with greater ease. Robotic Surgical Tools Mechanical engineering students at Brigham Young University (BYU), under the guidance of their professors Barry Howell, Spencer Magleby, and Brian Jensen, combined additive printing technology and the ancient art of Origami to create surgical tools that can fit through 3mm wide incisions. Inside the body, the tools can unfold and expand into complex devices such as D-core tools. Minute incisions allow for quick healing eliminating the need for sutures and scars. The tools are highly precise and effective as well. Researchers at BYU are now collaborating with California-based Intuitive Surgicals to manufacture their products. The company is using 3D printing to develop both the prototypes and the actual tools. The 3D printing technology is also helping Intuitive Surgicals to create instruments with fewer parts making the entire process more cost-effective and stable. The Pathfinder ACL Guide Orthopedic surgeon Dr. Dana Piasecki of the OrthoCarolina Sports Medicine has developed a 3D printed surgical tool to conduct ACL surgeries with improved success. Currently, most surgeons drill a hole in the patient’s tibia to remove the torn anterior cruciate ligament and replace it with a graft. The procedure is painful, and the graft often fails to anchor properly. The Pathfinder ACL Guide, created by Dr. Piasecki in collaboration with Strasys Direct Manufacturing, has a 95 percent chance of placing the graft at the right position and helping it withstand the stress associated with extensive movement. The surgical tool is made from a biocompatible and flexible metal and is significantly cheaper than the existing devices. The Pathfinder ACL Guide has been registered with the FDA as a class I medical device and can now help thousands of amateur and professional athletes to continue playing their game in spite of an ACL tear. Eyelid Wands and Forceps Similarly, Dr. Bret Kotlus, a New York-based cosmetic surgeon, has used 3D printing technology to create customized tools for eyelid surgeries. His stainless steel Eyelid Wand helps surgeons lift excess eyelid skin and point it to various facial structures as per the needs of the patient. The handle of the tool consists of a ruler for accurate measurements. Dr. Kotlus has also developed 3D printed Pinch Blepharoplasty Marking Forceps that allow surgeons to mark excessive skin with a gentle ink. It comes with a round tip and a built-in ruler handle for additional patient comfort. These tools also add some sophistication to the doctor’s office at an affordable price. Close to 50 million surgical inpatient procedures are performed across the United States each year. While recent times have seen a significant improvement in the way these interventions are carried out, a lot can be done to make the process more efficient and safe. This is where 3D printing is bound to make a huge impact in the near future. Sources: Johnson & Johnson Adopts Cutting Edge 3D Printing for the Future of Medical Devices 3d printed eyelid instrument designed by Dr. Kotlus 3D Printed Tool Offers New Option for ACL Surgery Researchers Combine Origami, 3D Printing in Quest for Smaller Surgical Tools
  2. Implantable medical devices help diagnose and treat serious health conditions ranging from anatomical abnormalities to cardiovascular illnesses and kidney diseases. Commonly used devices include implantable cardioverter defibrillators, pacemakers, intra-uterine devices, spine crews, hip implants, metal screws, and artificial knees. Recent years have seen a significant increase in the use of such implants, which has led to the creation of several innovative products with improved function. Batteries play a crucial role in the successful operation of certain implantable devices. Most products rely on lithium cells that are powerful and easy to use. These electrochemical power sources can, however, lead to toxic side effects. Some patients may also experience biocompatibility issues. Healthcare professionals, nonetheless, had limited options, at least until now. The 3D Printed Battery Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are aiming to overcome the drawbacks associated with traditional batteries by developing biodegradable versions made from natural ingredients. They have developed a prototype battery that can provide 5 milliWatts of power for up to 18 hours. This energy is enough to deliver medications slowly over a span of several hours or to detect the growth of pathogenic bacteria within the body. The battery is made from melanin pigment found in skin, hair and nails. The pigment protects the body by absorbing ultraviolet light and toxic free radicals. It also has the ability to bind to metallic ions and can therefore, transform into the perfect battery material. While melanin can form either the anodic or the cathodic terminal of the battery, magnesium oxide is used as the second terminal and the GI fluid comprises the electrolyte. The materials are housed in a three-dimensional (3D) printed capsule made from polylactic acid, or PLA. A 3D printer allows researchers to deposit the desired materials on a substrate in a specific pattern. It was invented in the 1980s to create engineering prototypes. Soon, researchers began using 3D printers in the field of medicine to improve patient outcomes. The technology helps customize the shape and the size of the outer capsule as per the needs of the consumer. The 3D printed capsule maintains the structural integrity of the battery and allows it to glide smoothly through the device. The capsule can dissolve quickly once it completes the essential functions. Other natural components within the battery can also degrade without producing any toxic side effects. The Future Currently, most ingestible and degradable probes and drug delivery systems remain in the body for about 20 hours. Although melanin batteries are less powerful when compared to their lithium counterparts, researchers believe that they could work very well with devices that remain in the body for only a few hours. The new battery is in the initial stages of development and will need to undergo extensive clinical testing before actual use. Nonetheless, it is a step in the right direction. Eventually, it may be possible to create more powerful versions of edible batteries that can support all types of medical devices, irrespective of their duration of use.
  3. The Most Advanced Vascular Training Models for Physicians Embodi3D has created a line of super-accurate 3D printed vascular models for physician and medical professional advanced training. Created by a board-certified physician who performs vascular procedures daily, these models were created for maximum procedural realism while being more practical and less expensive than conventional animal labs or silicone tube models. Physician specialists who utilize these models include vascular surgeons, cardiologists, and radiologists. Numerous medical device companies use these models to teach and demonstrate their devices under realistic circumstances. Hospitals and medical schools use them to teach residents, fellows and medical students how to perform vascular procedures. To view our full product catalog with updated information please see the Vascular Training Models page. You will learn about the models shown on this page and many more. If you are interested in these training models, please Contact us. IVC Filter - Whole Body Venous Training Model The whole body venous medical training model includes all the major venous structures in the human body from the right jugular vein of the neck to the right and left common femoral veins at the level of the hips. The whole body venous model allows for the education and training in a variety of IVC filter related procedures. The model was created from a real CT scan so the vessel positions, diameters, and angles are all real. Entry points are present at the right jugular vein and brachiocephalic vein for upper body access, and the bilateral common femoral veins for lower body access. Attachments are present to make placement of a real vascular sheath easy. The model can be used to teach or practice the following procedures: IVC filter placement, jugular or femoral approach Common iliac filter placement, jugular or femoral approach IVC filter retrieval Venous stenting IVC and iliac vein thrombectomy or thrombolysis Venous embolization Hepatic vein cannulation The model can be used to illustrate specific devices for the procedures listed above and is used by medical device companies to demonstrate and teach the use of their products. The IVC model comes in a portable carrying case and is easily transportable. It assembles and disassembles in less than 20 seconds. Caption: An attendee of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting deploying an IVC filter in the IVC filter training model. Models are commonly used at medical trade shows to allow attendees to quickly get hands-on experience with medical equipment. If you are interested in the IVC Filter - whole body venous training model, please contact us. Abdomen and Pelvis Arterial Embolization and Stenting Medical Model The abdomen and pelvis embolization and stenting model has detailed arterial anatomy generated from a real CT scan, so the exact vessel shapes, diameters, and angles are all real. Numerous detailed vessel branches are included for maximum realism and for practicing extremely fine catheterization. For example, the right, middle, and left hepatic arteries are included, which are only accessible after four levels of branching (Aorta -> Celiac artery -> Common hepatic artery -> Proper hepatic artery -> Right, middle, and left hepatic arteries). Vascular sheath attachment points are present at the right and left common femoral arteries, as they would be during a real procedure. This provides an unparalleled level of realism for training in an in vitro model. It is a revolutionary training tool for interventional radiologists, cardiologists, and vascular surgeons. It is commonly used at professional training sessions, trade shows and conventions, in-hospital training sessions, and at medical schools for teaching residents and fellows. Medical device companies use the model to demonstrate and teach the use of their microcatheter, wire, and embolization products to physicians. This medical model can be used to teach or practice the following procedures: Aneurysm embolization Stent assisted embolization Balloon assisted embolization Splenic artery embolization Gastroduodenal artery embolization Yttrium-90 radioembolization mapping Yttrium-90 radioembolization treatment Hepatic chemoembolization Angiography for G.I. bleeding Renal artery angiography Renal artery stenting Pelvic angiography and embolization for trauma Internal iliac artery embolization Internal iliac artery stent-grafting Abdominal aorta stent-grafting Arteries Included: Abdominal aorta Common iliac arteries Internal and external iliac arteries Common femoral arteries Celiac artery and branches Splenic artery Left gastric artery Common hepatic artery, left, middle, and right hepatic arteries Gastroduodenal artery Superior mesenteric artery and branches Inferior mesenteric artery and branches Renal arteries Aneurysms included: Splenic artery, proximal, 25 mm berry aneurysm, 10 mm neck Splenic artery, distal, 20 mm berry aneurysm, 7.5 mm neck Right renal, 10 mm berry aneurysm, 8 mm neck Left renal, inferior, 5 mm berry aneurysm, 3.5 mm neck Left iliac artery, fusiform aneurysm, 33 mm x 23 mm Arterial Stenoses: Left renal, accessory branch, stenosis, 2mm The model assembles and disassembles in less than 20 seconds. It comes with its own durable and customized carrying case for safe and easy transport Thank you for your interest in Embodi3D's advanced vascular training models. If you have any additional questions about our existing training models, or are interested in having us create a new training model for your special need, please contact us.
  4. Description: The original abdominal aorta model has detailed arterial anatomy generated from a real CT scan, so the exact vessel shapes, diameters, and angles are all real. Numerous detailed vessel branches are included for maximum realism and for practicing extremely fine catheterization. For example, the right, middle, and left hepatic arteries are included, which are only accessible after four levels of branching (Aorta -> Celiac artery -> Common hepatic artery -> Proper hepatic artery -> Right, middle, and left hepatic arteries). Vascular sheath attachment points are present at the right and left common femoral arteries, as they would be during a real procedure. This provides an unparalleled level of realism for training in an in vitro model. It is a revolutionary training tool for interventional radiologists, cardiologists, and vascular surgeons. It is commonly used at professional training sessions, trade shows and conventions, in-hospital training sessions, and at medical schools for teaching residents and fellows. Medical device companies use the model to demonstrate and teach the use of their micro catheter, wire, and embolization products to physicians. This model is not compatible with other embodi3D models at this time. The model assembles and disassembles in less than 20 seconds. It comes with its own durable and customized carrying case for safe and easy transport.
    Aneurysms for embolization: Splenic artery, proximal, 25 mm berry aneurysm, 10 mm neck Splenic artery, distal, 20 mm berry aneurysm, 7.5 mm neck Right renal, 10 mm berry aneurysm, 8 mm neck Left renal, inferior, 5 mm berry aneurysm, 3.5 mm neck Left iliac artery, fusiform aneurysm, 33 mm x 23 mm Arterial Stenoses: Left renal, accessory branch, stenosis, 2mm Arteries Included: Arteries Included: Abdominal aorta Common iliac arteries Internal and external iliac arteries Common femoral arteries Celiac artery and branches Splenic artery Left gastric artery Common hepatic artery, right hepatic artery Gastroduodenal artery Superior mesenteric artery and branches Inferior mesenteric artery and branches Renal arteries Procedures that this model can teach or practice: Aneurysm embolization General Stent assisted Balloon assisted Vessel embolization Splenic artery Gastroduodenal artery (Y-90 mapping and upper GI bleeding) Yttrium-90 radioembolization mapping Yttrium-90 radioembolization treatment Hepatic chemoembolization Angiography for G.I. bleeding Renal artery angiography Renal artery stenting Pelvic angiography and embolization for trauma Internal iliac artery embolization Internal iliac artery stent-grafting Abdominal aorta stent-grafting Compatibility: None For questions and pricing contact us. Please include the model name and number with your inquiry: Stand Alone Abdominal Aorta Model (# AABD01000C)
  5. Recent developments in the field of three-dimensional (3D) medical printing and bioprinting can revolutionize the way doctors approach ear disorders. The technology, also known as additive printing, allows the user to deposit a desired material on a specific substrate in a pre-determined manner to create 3D prints with definitive shapes and sizes. Scientists and healthcare professionals are already relying on this technology to create surgical instruments, anatomical models, diagnostic tools, prosthetics and even body parts. These novel solutions are offering hope to more than 360 million men, women and children across the globe who suffer from some form of hearing loss. 3D Printing and Smart Phones Make for Easy and Affordable Diagnoses Recently, students of A&M Texas University’s chapter of Engineering World Health used a 3D printer to create LED ostoscope smartphone attachments that take pictures of the patients’ inner ears and help diagnose conditions contributing to hearing loss. Unlike traditional ostoscopes that cost hundreds of dollars, these smartphone attachments can be built for just $6.42. Doctors working in underprivileged areas of South Asia, Asia Pacific and Sub-Saharan Africa can depend on this imaging device for accurate diagnosis, prompt treatment and effective prognosis. 3D Printed Hearing Aids Ontenna, a simple hairclip with a built-in hearing aid, is another glowing example of the way 3D printing technology is impacting Otology. The 3D printed device picks up sounds between 30 and 90 decibles and translates them into 256 different vibrations and light patterns that allow the wearer to actually feel and see the sound. Ontenna was developed by Tatsuya Honda, a researcher and sign language interpreter, who worked closely with the deaf community and understood the drawbacks of traditional hearing aids. The device is currently in the testing phase and may soon be available for commercial use. 3D Printing and Ear Prosthetics In another pioneering attempt, physicians at Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Edinburgh, Scotland, under the supervision of Dr. Ken Stewart, adopted the 3D printing technology to treat microtia, a congenital disorder characterized by underdeveloped ears. Traditionally, children with this condition were required to lay down in an MRI machine for a significant period of time while the doctors obtained a 2D tracing of the normal ear. Understandably, most children were overwhelmed by the process and became fearful of it. Doctors in Edinburgh are now using a 3D scanner to obtain the exact dimensions of the child’s ear. A 3D printer then creates a replica of the organ, which is sterilized and used during the carving process. Dr. Stewart is also working with Edinburgh University’s Centre for Regenerative Medicine and Chemistry Department to bioprint an ear using the patient’s own stem cells and is very excited about the potential of 3D printing in managing hearing loss. 3D Printing the Ear A study published in the October, 2015, edition of the journal Nature Biotechnology revealed that researchers have succeeded in printing human-sized ears with the help of the Integrated Tissue and Organ Printing System (ITOP) and have implanted them into mice. The implanted organs retained their shape over the next two months and formed blood vessels and cartilages. Success of ITOP in animal models is a big step in the right direction as it will allow doctors to print complex ear implants that are stable and functional. Most people take their sense of hearing for granted. However, many conditions ranging from infections and injuries to fluid problems can impact it. Physicians and patients are looking for treatments that will help overcome deficiencies associated with existing modalities, and 3D printing technology is helping them do just that. Sources: http://thebridge.jp/en/2015/08/ontenna-lets-you-hear-sounds-through-your-hair http://www.bustle.com/articles/142312-3d-printed-ear-jaw-muscle-implants-are-revolutionizing-medical-technology
  6. A two week old baby, with a complicated heart problem that required an equally complicated surgery, in a New York hospital has been saved with the help of a 3D printed heart. At the Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital in New York City, the baby’s heart was 3D printed with the help of an MRI scan data. The baby was suffering from coronary heart disease (CHD). Commonly with CHD, the heart is riddled with holes—this is likewise true of the baby’s heart but what made the condition worse was that the baby’s heart was also structured unusually. The heart of the baby was like a maze with its unusual formation that required complicated heart surgery. In a normal operation, the first time that the surgeon gets to see the heart is during the surgery itself. The heart needs to be stopped and that’s the time the surgeon can look inside and decide what needs to be done. And with this kind of operation technique, subsequent surgeries would be needed too. However, with the help of 3D printing, doctors like Dr. Emile Bacha, who accomplished the surgery on the baby, can have the opportunity to take a look at the patient’s heart beforehand, have enough time to study it and make a surgical plan. The surgery went smoothly and Dr. Bacha was able to repair the baby’s heart with just one operation, with a big thanks to 3D printing. The project was funded by a Connecticut based foundation, the Matthew’s Hearts of Hope.
  7. Garrett Peterson is an 18-month old baby who has never been to his home because of a medical condition known as Tetralogy of Fallot with a missing pulmonary valve. This condition places a great deal of pressure on the baby’s airways. And worse is, the condition led to the development of tracheobronchomalacia which is the softening of the bronchi and trachea thereby causing his airways to become tiny slits. With this condition, baby Garrett has lived all his life attached to a ventilator in a hospital bed. Even though baby Garrett was provided with maximum ventilator pressure levels, he showed no signs of improvement; thus, leading to the decision to put him in an induced coma so that the vent won’t work against his declining health. Through the efforts of Dr. Scott Hollister and Dr. Glenn Green of the University of Michigan, who were given clearance by the FDA to create and plant a bioprinted tracheal splint that’s made of polycaprolactone. The created splint was customized to fit baby Garrett’s bronchi with the help of a CT scan of his bronchi and trachea. The surgery was done by a Pediatric Cardiovascular Surgeon of the C.S. Mott, Dr. Richard G. Ohye and was assisted by Dr. Green. They performed the surgery by attaching two implants on two places of the baby’s airway. This will lend support to expand the baby’s airways and further support proper growth. Splints were also attached to the baby’s right and left bronchi. With the success of the operation, the prognosis is good and baby Garrett is now able to ventilate both lungs at a lesser vent pressure. The bioprinted splints implanted were estimated to be reabsorbed by the body within three years’ time. Now Garrett Peterson can go home.