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Found 2,066 results

  1. Version 1.0.0

    55 downloads

    This model is the right knee bone rendering of a 65-year-old male with left thigh myxoid fibrosarcoma. At the time of diagnosis, the patient had metastases to his lungs. The patient therefore underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy and was found to have an intermediate grade lesion at the time of diagnosis. The patient is still living with the metastatic disease at 2.5 years since diagnosis. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The knee is composed of 3 separate joints: two hinge joints (medial and lateral femorotibial joints), and one sellar, or gliding, joint (the patellofemoral joint). These also compose the three compartments of the knee: medial, lateral, and patellofemoral. Although the knee is thought of as a hinge joint, it has 6 degrees of motion: extension/flexion, internal/external rotation, varus/valgus, anterior/posterior translation, medial/lateral translation, and compression/distraction. To provide stability to the joint, static and dynamic stabilizers surround the knee, including muscles and ligaments. The major ligaments that provide stability to the knee include the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), lateral (or fibular) collateral ligament (LCL), and medial collateral ligament (MCL). The ACL prevents anterior translation of the knee and the PCL prevents posterior translation of the knee. The LCL prevents varus stresses and the MCL prevents valgus stresses on the knee. Furthermore, the medial meniscus is a secondary stabilizer to anterior translation and is therefore commonly injured during an ACL tear or after an untreated ACL tear. This model was created from the file STS_022.

    Free

  2. Version 1.0.0

    63 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file contains a model of the l;umbar spine was derived from a real medical CT scan. This model was created using the embodi3D free online 3D model creation service. QIN-HN-01-0003

    Free

  3. Version 1.0.0

    34 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file contains a model of the bones of the pelvis and sacrum was derived from a real medical CT scan. This model was created using the embodi3D free online 3D model creation service.

    Free

  4. Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    This is a case of 56-year old female patient with right thigh swelling, histo-pathology revealed it to be solitary fibrous tumor of the right thigh with intermediate grade of malignancy. MRI and PET scan were done for this patient after the initial diagnosis by 3 and 36 days respectively. Her treatment plan included radiotherapy and surgical resection of the tumor combined. upon 637 days of follow up , the patient showed no evidence of disease (NED). This STL file had been created from a CT scan DICOM dataset and is availabe for medical 3D printing .

    Free

  5. Version 1.0.0

    125 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file contains a model of the right kidney was derived from a medical CT scan. It shows the renal collecting system clearly. This model was created using the democratiz3D 3D model creation service. 0522c0878

    Free

  6. Version 1.0.0

    17 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file contains a model of the heart and coronary arteries was derived from a medical CT scan. The left main coronary artery has an abnormal (aberrant) origin, arising from the main pulmonary artery trunk. This model was created using the democratiz3D 3D model creation service toutatix

    $4.99

  7. Cutting down costs for 3D prints is the number one concern for many Doctors and Patients. In order to achieve this, we need to understand how costs for 3D prints are calculated. Probably the most important variable is the amount of material that is needed for printing your medical object. So all we need to do is to make sure to use as little material as possible. Here are our some top tips for more successful 3D printing. They're short and to the point, and if you follow them, you'll find your models will stand straight and look beautiful. Create a hollow 3D model & 3D print with Escape Holes if needed. A hollow model means that the interior of your object will not be solid. Solid designs are not necessarily a problem – they will be stronger and harder to break (depending on the material), but they will also be more expensive as more 3D printing material will be used.With a hollow model the interior of your print will be empty (in theory). However, since our printers print layer by layer, 3D printing material can get trapped in the interior of your model. If you would like to avoid this, you can add ‘escape holes’ to your design. Material that is not used for building your 3D print can then be removed. However, creating a 3D model with an empty interior can be a bit tricky, you need to know how to hollow your model in the 3D modeling software you’re using, you need to define a wall thickness that is strong enough for your model not to break, and it probably makes sense to add so-called ‘escape holes’ to your model Why do I need escape holes? As already pointed out, our 3D prints are created layer by layer. With a hollow interior, this means that 3D printing materials can get trapped inside the object. A hollow model full of trapped powder is in danger of deforming. Escape holes are recommended for getting ‘trapped’ 3D printing material out of your 3D print. We typically use pressurized air for cleaning the excess powder off. How do I design escape holes? Again, the exact procedure depends on your software but the idea is often the same: create a cylinder at the bottom of your model and extrude or subtract from its wall Use supports If you plan on printing out a figure as one solid piece, you'll want to consider placing supports at overhang areas. Some slicing/preference software will do this automatically. The Infill for FDM 3D Printing The Slicing softwares lets you adjust the infill percentage and infill type to print your model in FDM. Choosing the correct percentage and type of infill depending on how strong you want your model to be can reduce the volume of your model making it cheaper. Know your materials Learn the tolerances of the various materials used. It's better to err on the larger side, because you can always sand or trim down the piece afterwards. Happy 3D Printing!!
  8. Version 1.0.0

    9 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file contains a model of the torso and arms was derived from a real medical CT scan in high detail. This model was created using the embodi3D free online 3D model creation service. QIN-HN-01-0003

    Free

  9. Version 1.0.0

    43 downloads

    3D printable head STL created from a CT scan. This model was created as part of this tutorial on created skin 3D printable models from medical CT scans.

    Free

  10. Version 1.0.0

    11 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file contains a model of the muscles and tendons of the shoulder of a 60 year old woman was derived from a real medical CT scan. It shows the pectoralis muscles, deltoid, latissimus dorsi, and other muscles of the shoulder. This model was created using the embodi3D free online 3D model creation service. STS007

    Free

  11. From the album: Blog images 3

    Some of the 3D printable STL files I made this week. You can download them here.
  12. Version 1.0.0

    10 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file contains a model of the bones of the chest abdomen and pelvis derived from a CT. Several ribs are missing as they were disconnected from the axial skeleton. This model was created using the Imag3D 3D model creation service TCGA-CS-6185

    Free

  13. Occasionally files uploaded to the democratiz3D service for conversion to STL will not process correctly. What should you do if this happens? Usually these failure are due to one of two items: 1) There is some problem with the uploaded file, or 2) The uploaded file is simply massive (i.e. head to toe thin cut CT). If you encounter a problem with processing of your file, the first thing to do it check the quality of your input file. See my earlier tutorial, Choosing the Best Medical Imaging Scan to Create a 3D Printed Medical Model, if you want more details. 1) Check the modality. Did you upload an MRI when the operation calls for a CT? 2) Check for artifacts. This will often cause the model to have obvious deformities. The most common is beam hardening from dental fillings, as shown below. Normal teeth without fillings are on the left, and teeth with metal dental fillings are shown on the right. Unfortunately, you can't make an STL file from data that isn't there. If you scan has lots of artifact, you can either choose another scan or go through the laborious process of fixing the artifacts manually after the model is created. 3) Reconstruction kernel. This refers to the edge enhancement or sharpening algorithm that was applied to the scan images after they were acquired on the scanner. These are often done on dedicated bone or lung CT scans to enhance the contrast as make it easier for the radiologist to see subtle findings, like hairline fractures. Which the edge enhancement algorithm (or sharp kernel) as shown on the left below makes the edges easier to see, it also results in a speckled or noisy appearance of the tissue. This can confuse the algorithm because some very high intensity spots may look like bone. If your file is failing and you are using a sharp kernel series from you scan, consider using a different series that has a smooth kernel, such as shown on the right below. If you must stick with the sharp kernel, increase the threshold level to reduce the amount of "sand" in your output file and increase the changes of a successful processing job. Hope this helps, Dr. Mike
  14. Version 1.0.0

    4 downloads

    3D printable STL file of the torso, created for a tutorial. Free to download for noncommercial use. STS 001

    Free

  15. Version 1.0.0

    12 downloads

    Lumbar spine 3D printable model in STL format. Derived from a noncontrast CT scan. STS 001

    Free

  16. Getting from DICOM to 3D printable STL file in 3D Slicer is totally doable...but it is important to learn some fundamental skills in Slicer first if you are not familiar with the program. This tutorial introduces the user to some basic concepts in 3D Slicer and demonstrates how to crop DICOM data in anticipation of segmentation and 3D model creation. (Segmentation and STL file creation are explored in a companion tutorial ) This tutorial is downloadable as a PDF file, 3D Slicer Tutorial.pdf or can be looked through in image/slide format here in the blog 3D Slicer Tutorial.pdf
  17. Dear Community Members, After many months of work, we are happy to announce the addition of a feature that will allow you to sell medical models you have designed on Embodi3D.com. While we always have encouraged our members to consider allowing their medical STL files to be downloaded for free, we understand that when a ton of time is invested in creating a valuable and high-quality model, it is reasonable to ask for something in return. Now Embodi3D members have two options: 1) You can share your medical models for free, or 2) you can charge for them. We hope these two options encourage more sharing and file uploads. The more models available, the more it helps the medical 3D printing community. For more details on how to sell your medical masterpieces on Embodi3D, go to the selling page. Thanks, and happy 3D printing!
  18. Hi. I'm medical engineer from medical university. I make a CAD model for quality 3d printing by Mimics / other software. 3d model prepare from CT/MRI-scans and some 3d/4d ultra-sound systems. If community need some help for it - PM me or biomedical.engineer@ya.ru. P.S. free sample and nice price only!
  19. 29 downloads

    The tibia, or shinbone, is the most common fractured long bone in your body. The long bones include the femur, humerus, tibia, and fibula. A tibial shaft fracture occurs along the length of the bone, below the knee and above the ankle. Because it typically takes a major force to break a long bone, other injuries often occur with these types of fractures. Often times the fibula is also compromised. This 3D printable model demonstrates Intramedullary nailing. The current most popular form of surgical treatment for tibial fractures is intramedullary nailing. During this procedure, a specially designed metal rod is inserted from the front of the knee down into the marrow canal of the tibia. The rod passes across the fracture to keep it in position. This 3D printable model of tibia shaft fracture contains two STL files for bioprinting. One STL file is for printing the tibia and fibula. There is another file for printing the pin or nail which is inserted within the tibia as part of intramedullary nailing. The files have been zipped to reduce file size. You will need to unzip the files once you have downloaded them.These files are distributed under the Creative Commons license Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs. Please respect the terms of the licensing agreement. The models are provided for distribution on embodi3D.com with the permission of the creators Dr. Beth Ripley and Dr. Tatiana. These models are part of the Top 10 Killers 3D printable disease library. James Weaver and Ahmed Hosny also contributed to the project. We thank everyone involved for their contributions to embodi3d.com and their advocacy for better health and education through 3D printing.

    Free

  20. Hi all! Just wanted to share that Autodesk has some great free programs/apps for cleaning up imported files and for scanning and CAD. In particular, MeshMixer is an amazing piece of software. I've been playing with it to clean up some CT spine files and it is really easy to use and powerful. As someone who has used all levels of CAD software, I can't believe it's free. Check out the Autodesk resources here: http://www.123dapp.com/create Enjoy!! Mike
  21. 159 downloads

    Alzheimer's disease is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, responsible for 85,000 deaths annually. These STL files allow you to 3D print a whole brain model with Alzheimers disease and another model of the enlarged brain ventricles associated with the disease. Alzheimer's is a neurodegenerative disease usually seen in the later stages of life. Problems with memory, behavior, performing daily activities and personality changes are common symptoms. It is a progressive disease, where dementia symptoms gradually worsen over a number of years. The destruction and loss of nerve cells associated with this disease are represented in the models. The models are provided for distribution on embodi3D.com with the permission of the creators Dr. Beth Ripley and Dr. Tatiana. These models are part of the Top 10 Killers 3D printable disease library. James Weaver and Ahmed Hosny also contributed to the project. We thank everyone involved for their contributions to embodi3d.com and their advocacy for better health and education through 3D printing. There are two STL files available for download and 3D bioprinting. One STL file for printing the ventricles and the other STL is for printing the whole brain. These files are distributed under the Creative Commons license Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs. Please respect the terms of the licensing agreement. Both files are verified as watertight (manifold) and 3D printable.

    Free

  22. From the album: ebaumel Blog images

    3D STL file of a kidney with a renal mass, from MRI data.
  23. From the album: ebaumel Blog images

    3D STL file of a section of a kidney with a renal mass, from MRI data.

    © Copyright ©2015 Eric M. Baumel, MD

  24. 121 downloads

    Half size version of skull base in STL format. This skull base was created from real CT scan data. The file is available in full-size and COLLADA versions as well. This file contains 17,807 vertices. A very high resolution version is available at Shapeways http://shpws.me/sfOY

    Free

  25. 179 downloads

    This full-sized skull base was created from real CT scan data. The file is available in half-size and COLLADA versions as well. This file contains 17,807 vertices. A very high resolution version is available at Shapeways

    Free

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