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Found 114 results

  1. Version 1.0.0

    5 downloads

    Arterielle Testfile - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. stl, 3d, model, printable, lumbar, spine, disc, iliac, bone, kidney, renal, arteries, abdominal, aorta, crest, ribs, mesenteric, superior, inferior, celiac, trunk

    Free

  2. Version 1.0.0

    19 downloads

    parte 1, angiography, stl, 3d, model, printable, aorta, abdominal, mesenteric, artery, trunk, celiac, renal, iliac, primitive, vessels, arteries

    Free

  3. Version 1.0.0

    5 downloads

    First Try CT angio - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. skull, head, orbit, nasal, septum, maxilla, frontal, temporal, occipital, parietal, zygomatic, arch, neck, cervical, dorsal, spine, carotid, arteries, scapula, clavicle, ribs, thorax, sternum, printable, 3d, model, stl, bone

    Free

  4. Version 1.0.0

    5 downloads

    Muscle, ct, with, contrast, stl, 3d, model, printable, axial, dicom, brain, lobules, bone, frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital, nasal, septum, maxillary, sinus, ethmoid, cells, atlas, axis, muscle, neck, mastoid, auditory canal, maxilla, mandible, tongue, carotid, yugular, subclavian, arteries, lung, trachea, esophagus, ribs, clavicle, scapula, thyroid

    Free

  5. Version 1.0.0

    19 downloads

    CT scan third try - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. 3d, model, stl, muscle, head, neck, frontal, temporal, occipital, arteries, nasal, mouth, lip, capitis, longus, scapula, levator, trapezium, sternocleidomastoid, scalene, 3d, model, printable

    Free

  6. Version 1.0.0

    7 downloads

    my lungs, CTA, with contrast, stl, axial, dicom, heart, lung, ribs, sternum, bone, scapula, muscle, intercostal, aorta, thoracic, dorsal, spine, bronchial, ventricle, auricle, lung, arteries, bronchus

    Free

  7. Version 1.0.0

    7 downloads

    PE model - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. bone, 3d model, stl, organ, printable, heart, neck, cervical, spine, carotid, arteries, thorax, clavicle, ribs, sternum, shoulder, scapula, humerus, upper, limb, head, acromion, glenoid, joint, lung, artery,

    Free

  8. Version 1.0.0

    4 downloads

    trial to stl - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. bone,3d, model,stl, vessels, arteries, aorta, splenic, renal, iliac crest, lumbar spine, ribs, thorax

    Free

  9. 18 downloads

    This contrast enhanced CT scan of the upper thorax and lower cervical spine of a dog with a neck tumor clearly shows the arteries and veins of the upper thorax and neck. Model details File format: STL vertices 899673 triangles 1799814 Model is manifold (error free) and ready for 3D printing This model was created using the democratiz3D service.

    Free

  10. Version 1.0.0

    27 downloads

    porcelain aorta - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. porcelain aorta, ct with contrast, scan, dicom, axial, thorax, heart, aorta, descending, ascending, porcelain, arch, bronchus, lung, pulmonary, trunk, arteries, great, vessels, calcification, ribs, chest Calcification of the thoracic aorta is often associated with valvular and coronary calcification, reflecting an underlying atherosclerotic process. It has been found to be associated with an increased rate of mortality and cardiovascular disease. Porcelain aorta (PA) is extensive calcification of the ascending aorta or aortic arch that can be completely or near completely circumferential. This entity is rare in the general population, but it has an increasing incidence in older patients and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) or aortic stenosis (AS). The clinical relevance is based on the fact that it can complicate surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for the treatment of severe AS by preventing safe access via the ascending aorta. PA is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, especially as a result of increased perioperative stroke risk. Recently, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a less invasive and feasible treatment option in patients at high risk for conventional SAVR. In some series, ≈20% (5%–33%) of patients undergoing TAVR were diagnosed with PA. Inconsistencies in the definition and the use of different diagnostic modalities contribute to this wide range of PA prevalence. We reviewed the available published data to seek a consistent, clinically relevant definition based on contemporary imaging, a firm understanding of the pathogenesis and associations, and the clinical implications of this disease entity. Abramowitz, Y., Jilaihawi, H., Chakravarty, T., Mack, M. J., & Makkar, R. R. (2015). Porcelain aorta: a comprehensive review. Circulation, 131(9), 827-836.

    Free

  11. Version 1.0.0

    22 downloads

    porcelain aorta, ct with contrast, scan, dicom, axial, thorax, heart, aorta, descending, ascending, porcelain, arch, bronchus, lung, pulmonary, trunk, arteries, great, vessels, calcification, ribs, chest Calcification of the thoracic aorta is often associated with valvular and coronary calcification, reflecting an underlying atherosclerotic process. It has been found to be associated with an increased rate of mortality and cardiovascular disease. Porcelain aorta (PA) is extensive calcification of the ascending aorta or aortic arch that can be completely or near completely circumferential. This entity is rare in the general population, but it has an increasing incidence in older patients and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) or aortic stenosis (AS). The clinical relevance is based on the fact that it can complicate surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for the treatment of severe AS by preventing safe access via the ascending aorta. PA is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, especially as a result of increased perioperative stroke risk. Recently, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a less invasive and feasible treatment option in patients at high risk for conventional SAVR. In some series, ≈20% (5%–33%) of patients undergoing TAVR were diagnosed with PA. Inconsistencies in the definition and the use of different diagnostic modalities contribute to this wide range of PA prevalence. We reviewed the available published data to seek a consistent, clinically relevant definition based on contemporary imaging, a firm understanding of the pathogenesis and associations, and the clinical implications of this disease entity. Abramowitz, Y., Jilaihawi, H., Chakravarty, T., Mack, M. J., & Makkar, R. R. (2015). Porcelain aorta: a comprehensive review. Circulation, 131(9), 827-836.

    Free

  12. Version 1.0.0

    2 downloads

    Test - stl file processed skin, face, eye, frontal, head, skull, nose, ear, arteries, temporal, vessels, 3dmodels, stl, printable This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more.

    Free

  13. Version 1.0.0

    5 downloads

    momomomo, axial, ct without contrast, stl, 3dmodel, carotid, arteries, yugular, parotid, neck, head

    Free

  14. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the USA and other developed countries. Imagine the number of lives that could be saved if doctors could predict heart attacks before they happen. Most heart attacks are caused by a buildup of cholesterol and triglycerides (called plaques) inside heart arteries that rupture, form blood clots, and block the artery. But not all plaques rupture and not all plaque ruptures cause disease. An Australian team of medical doctors and mechanical engineers hopes to predict where plaques will form, which plaque sites will rupture, and which ruptured sites will cause heart attacks. With this knowledge cardiologists could place a stent to hold open the afflicted artery before the attack occurs. As a river twists and branches, sediment builds up on some banks, and the water sweeps others bare. The same is true of arteries and plaque formation. And each individual has different arterial branches. Knowing an individual’s heart artery structure will enable the design of individualized 3D-printed models to help plan surgery, and design perfectly fitted stents, which would aid in the current challenges of stent placement. Peter Barlis, the leader of the team, holds up a 3D printed artery in the leading image above. Another member of the team, associate professor Andre McIsaac, said, “the long term outcome is dependent on how well our stents are put in, in fact how well they’re deployed and expanded and having the right size stent in the right spot in the correct coronary artery.” Dr. Peter Barlis at the University of Melbourne and a team of researchers are working on predicting the sites of future heart attacks, by using state-of-the-art imaging techniques and computer models. Images captured from inside a heart artery using Optical Coherence Tomography. Photo credit: University of Melbourne The imaging technique, called optical coherence tomography (OCT), is a type of CT scan, except instead of x-rays it uses near-infra red light, at the edge of the visual spectrum. In the video below, you can see a red light on the camera. The light does not penetrate as deeply as x-rays do, so a wire-like camera is inserted into the heart via a vein. It can be performed at the same time as a routine angiogram. Barlis brought OCT imaging to Australia in 2009, and now it’s used in all major hospitals there. It was approved by the FDA for use in cardiology in the US in 2010. But researchers can’t know if they actually prevented an attack or if it would not have happened in the first place. They are attempting to connect arterial branch location, the types of mechanical stress on arterial walls, blood flow, and existing plaque to the risk of rupture. Barlis and a team of researchers published a review article in the European Heart Journal in February of this year about current computer modelling techniques to give other cardiologists insights into this growing field. Press release at EurekAlert!
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