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Found 353 results

  1. Version 1.0.0

    2 downloads

    lungs

    Free

  2. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    Joel Thoracic 80857 - processed

    Free

  3. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    Joel Thoracic 7.2 - processed

    Free

  4. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    JOel 8099 - processed

    Free

  5. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    3D model of the thoracic spine, aortic arch and descending aorta are also shown. The first image from left to right shows an Anterior View , then a Lateral left and then right, then an Oblique View, then axial and posterior views. Rodriguez Thoracic 1 - processed

    Free

  6. Version 1.0.0

    26 downloads

    This is 3d model of aortic arch with bicarotid trunk anomaly and aberrant right subclavian artery (arteria lusoria), which was made from CTA scan. The patient is caucasian woman with stenosis of the left vertebral artery (which is not included) and severe disphagia. It's part of a anatomical series of aortic arch anomalies and it's for clinical anatomy teaching purposes.

    $10.00

  7. Version 1.0.0

    42 downloads

    Whole Spine (Dorsal-Lumbar-Sacral) and Aorta NRRD file from CT Scan for Medical 3D Printing: The dorsal (thoracic) spine forms the middle portion of the vertebral column extending below the seventh cervical vertebra to above the first lumbar vertebra. The dorsal spine is formed by twelve vertebral bodies. The vertebrae forming the dorsal spine are unique in shape as they are the only vertebral bodies articulating with ribs. The lumbar spine represents the mid-lower segment of the vertebral column and is composed of five adjacent vertebrae. They are convex anteriorly to form a lumbar lordosis. The lumbar spine facet joints allows limited movements and rotation. The sacrum is the lower most segment of the vertebral column and also forms the posterior wall of the bony pelvis. The sacrum is formed by five fused sacral vertebrae.The sacrum is formed by fusion of five sacral vertebrae has three surfaces, a base and an apex. The body of the first segment is large and is similar to lumbar vertebra whereas the bodies of the next bones get progressively smaller, are flattened from the back, and curved to shape. The sacrum articulates with four other bones – iliac bones on either side, L5 above and coccyx below. It is tilted forward and curved with anterior concavity and posterior convexity allowing greater room for pelvic cavity. The curvature of sacrum varies in individuals. This model shows segment of the heart, the aorta and sacro-iliac joints. The CT scan is derived from the file ABD_LYMPH_001 The 3D bone model created from this scan can be reviewed at:

    Free

  8. Version 1.0.0

    23 downloads

    Whole Spine (Dorsal-Lumbar-Sacral) and Aorta: The dorsal (thoracic) spine forms the middle portion of the vertebral column extending below the seventh cervical vertebra to above the first lumbar vertebra. The dorsal spine is formed by twelve vertebral bodies. The vertebrae forming the dorsal spine are unique in shape as they are the only vertebral bodies articulating with ribs. The lumbar spine represents the mid-lower segment of the vertebral column and is composed of five adjacent vertebrae. They are convex anteriorly to form a lumbar lordosis. The lumbar spine facet joints allows limited movements and rotation. The sacrum is the lower most segment of the vertebral column and also forms the posterior wall of the bony pelvis. The sacrum is formed by five fused sacral vertebrae. The sacrum is formed by fusion of five sacral vertebrae has three surfaces, a base and an apex. The body of the first segment is large and is similar to lumbar vertebra whereas the bodies of the next bones get progressively smaller, are flattened from the back, and curved to shape. The sacrum articulates with four other bones – iliac bones on either side, L5 above and coccyx below. It is tilted forward and curved with anterior concavity and posterior convexity allowing greater room for pelvic cavity. The curvature of sacrum varies in individuals. This model shows segment of the heart, the aorta and sacro-iliac joints. This 3D model was created from the file ABD_LYMPH_001 The original CT examination can be reviewed at:

    Free

  9. Dr. Mike

    Human Heart

    Version 2

    604 downloads

    STL file of 3D printable human heart, full-size. The model has not yet been optimized for 3D printing, so there may be issues with minimum wall thickness, etc. If you print this file, please report back about how the printing went.

    Free

  10. The Most Advanced Vascular Training Models for Physicians Embodi3D has created a line of super-accurate 3D printed vascular models for physician and medical professional advanced training. Created by a board-certified physician who performs vascular procedures daily, these models were created for maximum procedural realism while being more practical and less expensive than conventional animal labs or silicone tube models. Physician specialists who utilize these models include vascular surgeons, cardiologists, and radiologists. Numerous medical device companies use these models to teach and demonstrate their devices under realistic circumstances. Hospitals and medical schools use them to teach residents, fellows and medical students how to perform vascular procedures. To view our full product catalog with updated information please see the Vascular Training Models page. You will learn about the models shown on this page and many more. If you are interested in these training models, please Contact us. IVC Filter - Whole Body Venous Training Model The whole body venous medical training model includes all the major venous structures in the human body from the right jugular vein of the neck to the right and left common femoral veins at the level of the hips. The whole body venous model allows for the education and training in a variety of IVC filter related procedures. The model was created from a real CT scan so the vessel positions, diameters, and angles are all real. Entry points are present at the right jugular vein and brachiocephalic vein for upper body access, and the bilateral common femoral veins for lower body access. Attachments are present to make placement of a real vascular sheath easy. The model can be used to teach or practice the following procedures: IVC filter placement, jugular or femoral approach Common iliac filter placement, jugular or femoral approach IVC filter retrieval Venous stenting IVC and iliac vein thrombectomy or thrombolysis Venous embolization Hepatic vein cannulation The model can be used to illustrate specific devices for the procedures listed above and is used by medical device companies to demonstrate and teach the use of their products. The IVC model comes in a portable carrying case and is easily transportable. It assembles and disassembles in less than 20 seconds. Caption: An attendee of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting deploying an IVC filter in the IVC filter training model. Models are commonly used at medical trade shows to allow attendees to quickly get hands-on experience with medical equipment. If you are interested in the IVC Filter - whole body venous training model, please contact us. Abdomen and Pelvis Arterial Embolization and Stenting Medical Model The abdomen and pelvis embolization and stenting model has detailed arterial anatomy generated from a real CT scan, so the exact vessel shapes, diameters, and angles are all real. Numerous detailed vessel branches are included for maximum realism and for practicing extremely fine catheterization. For example, the right, middle, and left hepatic arteries are included, which are only accessible after four levels of branching (Aorta -> Celiac artery -> Common hepatic artery -> Proper hepatic artery -> Right, middle, and left hepatic arteries). Vascular sheath attachment points are present at the right and left common femoral arteries, as they would be during a real procedure. This provides an unparalleled level of realism for training in an in vitro model. It is a revolutionary training tool for interventional radiologists, cardiologists, and vascular surgeons. It is commonly used at professional training sessions, trade shows and conventions, in-hospital training sessions, and at medical schools for teaching residents and fellows. Medical device companies use the model to demonstrate and teach the use of their microcatheter, wire, and embolization products to physicians. This medical model can be used to teach or practice the following procedures: Aneurysm embolization Stent assisted embolization Balloon assisted embolization Splenic artery embolization Gastroduodenal artery embolization Yttrium-90 radioembolization mapping Yttrium-90 radioembolization treatment Hepatic chemoembolization Angiography for G.I. bleeding Renal artery angiography Renal artery stenting Pelvic angiography and embolization for trauma Internal iliac artery embolization Internal iliac artery stent-grafting Abdominal aorta stent-grafting Arteries Included: Abdominal aorta Common iliac arteries Internal and external iliac arteries Common femoral arteries Celiac artery and branches Splenic artery Left gastric artery Common hepatic artery, left, middle, and right hepatic arteries Gastroduodenal artery Superior mesenteric artery and branches Inferior mesenteric artery and branches Renal arteries Aneurysms included: Splenic artery, proximal, 25 mm berry aneurysm, 10 mm neck Splenic artery, distal, 20 mm berry aneurysm, 7.5 mm neck Right renal, 10 mm berry aneurysm, 8 mm neck Left renal, inferior, 5 mm berry aneurysm, 3.5 mm neck Left iliac artery, fusiform aneurysm, 33 mm x 23 mm Arterial Stenoses: Left renal, accessory branch, stenosis, 2mm The model assembles and disassembles in less than 20 seconds. It comes with its own durable and customized carrying case for safe and easy transport Thank you for your interest in Embodi3D's advanced vascular training models. If you have any additional questions about our existing training models, or are interested in having us create a new training model for your special need, please contact us.
  11. From the album: aorta, AIC, AFS aneurisms

    finished model of aortic, AIC and AFS aneurisms. Made of PLA.

    © Vjekoslav Kopacin

  12. I just finished a 3D print of a rather large AAA. I think it turned out alright. Any thoughts? Anyone else doing work like this?
  13. Embodi3D now offers customized 3D printed artery and vein models for physician education and medical device testing. All models are derived from real patient CT scan data so the anatomy precisely matches that of a real patient for maximum realism. These models are perfect for demonstrating and testing endovascular medical devices, such as wires, catheters, coils, stents and stent-grafts, IVC filters, and thrombectomy devices. Please contact info@embodi3d.com for additional information.
  14. From the album: Printing your model: from XY to Z

    A large hole in the print bed is seen in the background of this picture- an unfortunate event which occurred when we inadvertently commanded the extruder to go down too far in the z axis (the z stop, in turns out, fails in some respects vis a vis its name- it doesn't actually stop your motor from trying to bludgeon the stage if you command it to). An outline of an aorta that didn't make it in the foreground marks the scene of another crime: the unfortunate fate of a non-sticking model (to be discussed in the next blog).

    © Beth Ripley 2015

  15. Dr. Eric Baumel recently posted a tutorial here on how to use the Mimics software by Materialise and an Ultimaker 2 printer to create 3D printable models. It is a really high quality tutorial and shows all the steps in model creation. Thanks Dr. Baumel for sharing with the community! Anybody else have experience with Mimics or the Ultimaker 2 printer?
  16. From the album: ebaumel Blog images

    Finished 3D printed model of a CT Angiogram of an abdominal aortic aneurysm produced on an Ultimaker 2 desktop printer.

    © Copyright ©2015 Eric M. Baumel, MD

  17. From the album: ebaumel Blog images

    Radiograph of a 3D printed model of a CT Angiogram of an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    © Copyright ©2015 Eric M. Baumel, MD

  18. From the album: ebaumel Blog images

    A wrapped 3D model of a CTA of an abdominal aortic aneurysm using the Materialise Mimics software.

    © Copyright ©2015 Eric M. Baumel, MD

  19. From the album: ebaumel Blog images

    Region growing of the contrast in an abdominal aorta to create a 3D model using the Materialise Mimics software.

    © Copyright ©2015 Eric M. Baumel, MD

  20. From the album: ebaumel Blog images

    A 3D model of a CTA of an abdominal aortic aneurysm created using the Materialise Mimics software.

    © Copyright ©2015 Eric M. Baumel, MD

  21. ebaumel

    Thresholding

    From the album: ebaumel Blog images

    Thresholding a CTA of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in the Materialise Mimics software to select the contrast in the aorta by CT density (in Hounsfield units).

    © Copyright ©2015 Eric M. Baumel, MD

  22. From the album: ebaumel Blog images

    A CTA of an abdominal aortic aneurysm using the Materialise Mimics software to create a 3D model.

    © Copyright ©2015 Eric M. Baumel, MD

  23. ebaumel

    3matic

    From the album: ebaumel Blog images

    A 3D model of a CTA of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in the Materialise 3matic software.

    © Copyright ©2015 Eric M. Baumel, MD

  24. From the album: ebaumel Blog images

    The G-code file of a 3D model of an CT angiogram of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in the Cura software, showing the support structure for a 3D print.

    © Copyright ©2015 Eric M. Baumel, MD

  25. From the album: ebaumel Blog images

    The STL file of a 3D model of an CT angiogram of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in the Cura software. A G-code file will be produced for printing on a 3D printer.

    © Copyright ©2015 Eric M. Baumel, MD

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