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Found 42 results

  1. Version 1.0.0

    10 downloads

    Sheryl Revoir - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. Dental, teeth, incisor, ct, scan, bone, palate, canine, maxillary, premolar, alveolar, arch, 3d, model, stl, printable, anatomy

    Free

  2. Version 1.0.0

    33 downloads

    Joan Malukis - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. Dental, teeth, incisor, ct, scan, bone, palate, canine, maxillary, premolar, alveolar, arch, 3d, model, stl, printable, anatomy

    Free

  3. Version 1.0.1

    3 downloads

    chronic sinusitis - stl file processed sinuses, skull, face, septum, nose, ct without contrast, stl, dicom, anatomy

    Free

  4. Version 1.0.0

    6 downloads

    anatomy bone project, pelvis ct without contrast, stl, axial, dicom, 3dmodel, printable, liver, spleen, kidney, intestine, hydroneprosis, lumbar, spine

    Free

  5. Simmiv

    Head Shot Skin

    Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    Skin Version mri, head, brain, t1, anatomy, axial, septum

    Free

  6. Version 1.0.0

    26 downloads

    This is 3d model of aortic arch with bicarotid trunk anomaly and aberrant right subclavian artery (arteria lusoria), which was made from CTA scan. The patient is caucasian woman with stenosis of the left vertebral artery (which is not included) and severe disphagia. It's part of a anatomical series of aortic arch anomalies and it's for clinical anatomy teaching purposes.

    $10.00

  7. Version 1.0.0

    26 downloads

    This is 3d model of aortic arch with type III elongation (according to Madhwal classification). I made it from MRI set, which I obtained from Osirix dicom library, Felix set. It's part of a anatomical series of aortic arch anomalies and it's for clinical anatomy teaching purposes.

    $10.00

  8. Version 1.0.0

    44 downloads

    This is a 3d printing version of my "Aortic arch with bicarotid trunk anomaly" 3d model. It's hollow and with proper supports, it can become a decent 3d printed model with 0,2mm or lesser layer thickness.

    $10.00

  9. valchanov

    Bovine Arch

    Version 1.0.0

    28 downloads

    This is 3d model of aortic arch with left common carotid artery, which branches from the brachiocephalic trunk (Bovine Arch) and a dilatation of the ascending aorte. I made the model from the Artifix CTA set, Osirix dicom library. It's part of a anatomical series of aortic arch anomalies and it's for clinical anatomy teaching purposes.

    $10.00

  10. Version 1.0.0

    28 downloads

    Acetabular fracture of the pelvis. CT scan, 2mm slides. Pelvix set, Osirix dicom library. link to sketchfab: Acetabular fracture of the pelvis

    $20.00

  11. Version 1.0.0

    6 downloads

    This model is the right thigh skin rendering of a 65-year-old male with left thigh myxoid fibrosarcoma. At the time of diagnosis, the patient had metastases to his lungs. The patient therefore underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy and was found to have an intermediate grade lesion at the time of diagnosis. The patient is still living with the metastatic disease at 2.5 years since diagnosis. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The thigh is divided into three compartments: the anterior, posterior, and adductor. After a femoral fracture or vascular injury in the thigh, increasing pressure within a compartment may threaten to compromise blood flow to muscles within the compartment, a syndrome known as “compartment syndrome.” Compartment syndrome is diagnosed clinically as “pain out of proportion to exam.” In patients that a clinical exam may not be obtained, such as those who are intubated or with a traumatic brain injury, a Stryker needle of each compartment may be performed. The diagnosis of compartment syndrome is defined as pressures within 30 mmHg of diastolic blood pressure. Compartment syndrome is an emergency and thigh fasciotomies must be performed immediately to prevent compromise of muscles within the compartment at risk. Thigh fasciotomies may be performed through a single incision for release of the anterior and posterior compartments, or a medial incision for decompression of the adductor compartment (less common). For the single incision technique, the incision is created laterally, and the fascia lata is incised. This exposes the anterior compartment, which is decompressed. The lateral intermuscular septum is then incised to decompress the posterior compartment. This model was created from the file STS_022.

    Free

  12. Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    This is the normal left foot and ankle muscle model of a 56-year-old male with right anterior thigh pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The primary motions of the ankle are dorsiflexion, plantarflexion, inversion, and eversion. However, with the addition of midfoot motion (adduction, and abduction), the foot may supinate (inversion and adduction) or pronate (eversion and abduction). In order to accomplish these motions, muscles outside of the foot (extrinsic) and muscles within the foot (intrinsic) attach throughout the foot, crossing one or more joints. Laterally, the peroneus brevis and tertius attach on the proximal fifth metatarsal to evert the foot. The peroneus longus courses under the cuboid to attach on the plantar surface of the first metatarsal, acting as the primary plantarflexor of the first ray and, secondarily, the foot. Together, these muscles also assist in stabilizing the ankle for patients with deficient lateral ankle ligaments from chronic sprains. Medially, the posterior tibialis inserts on the plantar aspect of the navicular cuneiforms and metatarsal bases, acting primarily to invert the foot and secondarily to plantarflex the foot. The flexor hallucis longus inserts on the base of the distal phalanx of the great toe to plantarflex the great toe, and the flexor digitorum inserts on the bases of the distal phalanges of the lesser four toes, acting to plantarflex the toes. The gastrocnemius inserts on the calcaneus as the Achilles tendon and plantarflexes the foot. Anteriorly, the tibialis anterior inserts on the dorsal medial cuneiform and plantar aspect of the first metatarsal base as the primary ankle dorsiflexor and secondary inverter. The Extensor hallucis longus and extensor digitorum longus insert on the dorsal aspect of the base of the distal phalanges to dorsiflex the great toe and lesser toes, respectively. This model was created from the file STS_014.

    Free

  13. Version 1.0.0

    32 downloads

    This is the normal right foot and ankle muscle model of a 56-year-old male with right anterior thigh pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The primary motions of the ankle are dorsiflexion, plantarflexion, inversion, and eversion. However, with the addition of midfoot motion (adduction, and abduction), the foot may supinate (inversion and adduction) or pronate (eversion and abduction). In order to accomplish these motions, muscles outside of the foot (extrinsic) and muscles within the foot (intrinsic) attach throughout the foot, crossing one or more joints. Laterally, the peroneus brevis and tertius attach on the proximal fifth metatarsal to evert the foot. The peroneus longus courses under the cuboid to attach on the plantar surface of the first metatarsal, acting as the primary plantarflexor of the first ray and, secondarily, the foot. Together, these muscles also assist in stabilizing the ankle for patients with deficient lateral ankle ligaments from chronic sprains. Medially, the posterior tibialis inserts on the plantar aspect of the navicular cuneiforms and metatarsal bases, acting primarily to invert the foot and secondarily to plantarflex the foot. The flexor hallucis longus inserts on the base of the distal phalanx of the great toe to plantarflex the great toe, and the flexor digitorum inserts on the bases of the distal phalanges of the lesser four toes, acting to plantarflex the toes. The gastrocnemius inserts on the calcaneus as the Achilles tendon and plantarflexes the foot. Anteriorly, the tibialis anterior inserts on the dorsal medial cuneiform and plantar aspect of the first metatarsal base as the primary ankle dorsiflexor and secondary inverter. The Extensor hallucis longus and extensor digitorum longus insert on the dorsal aspect of the base of the distal phalanges to dorsiflex the great toe and lesser toes, respectively. This model was created from the file STS_014.

    Free

  14. Version 1.0.0

    13 downloads

    This 3D model shows the normal anatomy of the pubic bone of a 62-year old female. The pubic bone consists of the superior pubic ramus, inferior pubic ramus and the body. The two superior pubic rami unite at the midline in the cartilagenous joint known as the symphysis pubis. This file was extracted from a CT scan DICOM data set.

    Free

  15. This week cdmalcolm posted a great article here at Embodi3d.com on how 3D-printed replicas of patient’s organs are helping surgeons plan for complicated operations. Today I'd like to supplement this topic by talking about the advances 3D printing can bring to medical education, specifically by recreating human models for students to study and dissect. Currently, the golden standard for teaching medical students the anatomy (overall structure) of the human body involves dissecting and observing cadavers – recently deceased humans who have given their bodies to science. However, obtaining and storing these bodies can be difficult for a number of reasons. For example, many cultural and religious beliefs preclude people from donating their bodies, and even in countries with strong donation programs bodies with rare diseases (by their very definition) are hard to find. Even when sufficient cadavers are donated, the process of preserving them to prevent natural decomposition can be costly. New technology comprising a mixed approach of 3D printing and traditional manufacturing can solve many of these problems by recreating accurate and numerous replicas of human anatomy with minimal expense. A recent publication in the January/Februrary edition of the journal “Anatomical Sciences Education” highlighted a prototype for this technology; the team from The University College Dublin in Ireland were able to recreate a portion of the hip, with 3D-printed bone and blood vessels surrounded by a flesh-like filler and covered in a synthetic skin. On top of this, they were able to connect a pump to the blood vessels to mimic the typical human circulatory system. The result wasn't fancy - the components were placed in a Tupperware container with holes for the tubing - but it had most of the necessary components for students to learn, and more importantly, obtain valuable practical experience. The advantage of using 3D printing for these models is that they can be changed to reflect the anatomy of specific diseases. For example, atherosclerosis occurs when blood vessels narrow, and it is an important factor in heart disease. In the prototype above, the team were able to 3D-print replicas of blood vessels from a healthy patient, and one with atherosclerosis - the vessels with atherosclerosis were a lot thicker, and students were able to assess this using ultrasound. The students were also able to perform basic techniques to locate the vessels via syringe, similar to how they may be required to set up an IV drip. And since the models only need to mimic the qualities of human organs rather than making functional tissue (see my previous article on the challenges of this), the models can be made relatively simply, and from materials that do not degrade over time like human flesh does. It might seem like a reconstruction of the human body would never be able to replicate the experience of learning from a true human body, however the results of the study above and previous work by The Centre for Human Anatomy Education in Australia showed that 3D printed models are just as good as cadavers for teaching students the principles of anatomy. And thus the future of manufactured lifelike bodies for teaching seems bright - indeed, one could imagine that many trending technologies could be integrated with these models to provide teaching experiences that surpass the current standard delivered by cadavers. Digital sensors are rapidly becoming cheaper and more ubiquitous in technology, and these could be incorporated into anatomical models to provide feedback to students during practical tasks. Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) are also trending with many potential application for medicine. Perhaps in the future, manufactured human anatomical models will be integrated with AR, in a way that replicates the experience of operating on real-life patients. And so, 3D printing technology seems poised to replace the long-standing use of cadavers for medical education, and soon many medical students will be able to sigh with relief at not having to prepare themselves to touch and dissect decomposing, smelly bodies. The inexpensive production of realistic bodies will give students better access to practical hands-on education, better preparing them for their eventual roles dealing with real patients. Image Credits: Simulab The Verge Pacific Vascular
  16. Hello everyone, For a friend of mine (a digestive surgeon), I'd like to print a colon, so he can help his patients to visualize this part of their anatomy and the surgery they will undergo. Does someone know where I can find a 3D model of this organ ? I'm new in 3D software and not able to generate it from a scan by myself. :-/ Thank you very much for your help. Jean-Christophe
  17. Monash University in Australia is using 3D printing to reduce the demand on human body parts for teaching anatomy. The link to the original article is here.
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