Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'DICOM'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Blogs

  • Embodi3d Test Blog
  • 3D Printing in Medicine
  • Cool Medical 3D-Printing
  • 3D Bio Printing by Paige Anne Carter
  • SSchoppert's Blog
  • Additive Manufacturing in Medicine
  • biomedical 3D printing
  • Bryce's Blog
  • Chris Leggett
  • 3D Models Help Improve Surgical Precision, Reduce Operating Time
  • Desktop 3D Printing in Medical Imaging
  • 3D Printing: Radiology corner
  • The Embodi3D.com Blog
  • descobar3d's Blog
  • 3D Printing in Anthropology
  • Learn to 3D Print: Basic Tools from software to printers
  • 3D printing for bio-medicine
  • 3D Biomedical Printing - by Jacob M.
  • Valchanov's Blog
  • Deirdre_Manion-Fischer's Blog
  • Matt Johnson's Biomedical 3D Printing Blog
  • Devarsh Vyas's Biomedical 3D Printing Blogs
  • Devarsh Vyas's Biomedical 3D Printing Blogs
  • Mike at Medical Models
  • Best embodi3d.com Medical and Anatomic Files

Forums

  • Biomedical 3D Printing
    • Hardware and 3D Printers
    • democratiz3D®
    • Software
    • Clinical applications
    • 3D Printable Models
    • Medical Imaging: CT, MRI, US
    • Science and Research
    • News and Trending Topics
    • Education, Conferences, Meetings, Events
  • General
    • Announcements
    • Questions and Answers
    • Suggestions and Feedback
    • Member Lounge (members only)
  • Classifieds, Goods and Services
    • General Classifieds - members post free
    • Services needed
    • Services offered
    • Stuff for sale/needed
    • Post a Job
    • Looking for work - visible only to members

Categories

  • democratiz3D® Processing
  • Bones
    • Skull and Head
    • Dental, Orthodontic, Maxillofacial
    • Spine and Pelvis
    • Extremity, Upper (Arm)
    • Extremity, Lower (Leg)
    • Thorax and Ribs
    • Whole body
    • Skeletal tumors, fractures and bony pathology
  • Muscles
    • Head and neck muscles
    • Extremity, Lower (Leg) Muscles
    • Extremity, Upper (Arm) Muscles
    • Thorax and Ribs Muscles
    • Abdomen and Pelvis muscles
    • Whole body Muscles
    • Muscular tumors and sarcomas
  • Cardiac and Vascular
    • Heart
    • Congenital Heart Defects
    • Aorta
    • Mesenteric and abdominal arteries
    • Veins
  • Organs of the Body
    • Brain and nervous system
    • Kidneys
    • Lungs
    • Liver
    • Other organs
  • Skin
  • Veterinary
    • Dogs
    • Cats
    • Other
  • Science and Research
    • Paleontology
    • Anthropology
    • Misc Research
  • Miscellaneous
    • Formlabs
  • Medical CT Scan Files
    • Skull, Head, and Neck CTs
    • Dental, Orthodontic, Maxillofacial CTs
    • Thorax and Ribs CTs
    • Abdomen and Pelvis CTs
    • Extremity, Upper (Arm) CTs
    • Extremity, Lower (Leg) CTs
    • Spine CTs
    • Whole Body CTs
    • MRIs
    • Ultrasound
    • Veterinary/Animals
    • Other

Product Groups

  • Premium Services
  • Physical Print Quotes

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Name


Secondary Email Address


Interests

Found 1,188 results

  1. Version 1.0.0

    9 downloads

    This is the normal right hip model of an 82-year-old male. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The hip joint is a ball and socket joint that has intrinsic stability from osseous, ligamentous, and muscular structures. The hip capsule is made of the iliofemoral, pubofemoral, and ischiofemoral ligaments which attach from the acetabulum to the femoral neck. The normal acetabulum is anteverted 15 degrees and abducted 45 degrees. The normal femoral anteversion is between 10-15 degrees. The proximal femur also includes the greater trochanter, to which the external rotators are attached, and the lesser trochanter, to which the iliopsoas is attached. This model was created from the file STS_013.

    Free

  2. Version 1.0.0

    12 downloads

    This is the normal right leg muscle model (including foot) of an 82-year-old male. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The lower leg is divided into four muscle compartments: the anterior, lateral, superficial posterior, and deep posterior compartments. The anterior compartment is made from the dorsiflexors, including the tibialis anterior, extensor hallucis longus (EHL), extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and peroneus tertius, which are innervated by the deep peroneal nerve. The lateral compartment includes the peroneus longus and peroneus brevis, which assist in foot eversion and are innervated by the superficial peroneal nerve. The superficial posterior compartment include the gastrocnemius, soleus, and plantaris, which assist in plantarflexion and are innervated by the tibial nerve. The deep posterior compartment is made up of the popliteus, flexor hallucis longus (FHL), flexor digitorum longus (FDL), and tibialis posterior, which mostly assist in plantarflexion and are innervated similarly by the tibial nerve. This file was created from the file STS_013.

    Free

  3. Version 1.0.0

    2 downloads

    These images are the isolated left thigh tumor muscle renderings of an 82 year old male with a dedifferentiated liposarcoma in the anterior compartment of the left thigh. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. Liposarcomas are the second most common soft tissue sarcoma in adults, occurring more commonly in males between the ages of 50 and 80 years old. They present as a slow growing, painless mass typically located in the extremities, with the thigh being the most common location. Multiple variants of liposarcomas exist, but the dedifferentiated type is a high-grade sarcoma. Dedifferentiated liposarcomas are typically located adjacent to a well-differentiated lipomatous lesion. The incidence of pulmonary metastasis increases with grade. Therefore, work up of the lesion consists of MRI, biopsy through the area of future resection, CT of the chest, abdomen and pelvis to rule out metastases. Treatment consists of radiation and wide surgical resection but chemotherapy agents are being developed to target chromosomal abnormalities associated with certain well-differentiated and dedifferentiated liposarcomas. This patient received radiation and resection of the tumor and has not had a metastasis or recurrence in 4.5 years. This model came from the file STS_013.

    Free

  4. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    These images are the bilateral leg muscle renderings of an 82 year old male with a dedifferentiated liposarcoma in the anterior compartment of the left thigh. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. Liposarcomas are the second most common soft tissue sarcoma in adults, occurring more commonly in males between the ages of 50 and 80 years old. They present as a slow growing, painless mass typically located in the extremities, with the thigh being the most common location. Multiple variants of liposarcomas exist, but the dedifferentiated type is a high-grade sarcoma. Dedifferentiated liposarcomas are typically located adjacent to a well-differentiated lipomatous lesion. The incidence of pulmonary metastasis increases with grade. Therefore, work up of the lesion consists of MRI, biopsy through the area of future resection, CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis to rule out metastases. Treatment consists of radiation and wide surgical resection but chemotherapy agents are being developed to target chromosomal abnormalities associated with certain well-differentiated and dedifferentiated liposarcomas. This patient received radiation and resection of the tumor and has not had a metastasis or recurrence in 4.5 years. This figure came from the file STS_013.

    Free

  5. Version 1.0.0

    76 downloads

    The lumbar spine is formed by 5 lumbar vertebrae labelled L1-L5 and the intervening discs. Its main function is to provide stability and permits movement. The lumbar vertebral body is formed of 3 parts : Body, arch and spinal processes. The body of the lumbar vertebrae is large, its transverse diameter is larger than is AP diameter, and is more thickened anteriorly. The arch of the lumbar vertebra on the other hand is formed of pedicle, a strong structure that is projected from the back of the upper part of the vertebrae, and lamina which forms the posterior portion of the arch. The lumbar spine processes are the spinal process, superior and inferior articular processes, and the transverse process. This is a 3D printable STL medical file that was converted from a CT scan DICOM dataset.

    Free

  6. Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    This is a case of 56-year old female patient with right thigh swelling, histo-pathology revealed it to be solitary fibrous tumor of the right thigh with intermediate grade of malignancy. MRI and PET scan were done for this patient after the initial diagnosis by 3 and 36 days respectively. Her treatment plan included radiotherapy and surgical resection of the tumor combined. upon 637 days of follow up , the patient showed no evidence of disease (NED). This STL file had been created from a CT scan DICOM dataset and is availabe for medical 3D printing .

    Free

  7. I am not able to find any free sample DICOMs. Is there any free sample DICOMs available. Osirix samples now require premier membership, which i do not have. Please guide
  8. Version 1.0.0

    431 downloads

    These are the DICOM CT scan files for the instructables tutorial for creating a 3D printable model. Download the zipped folder and unzip it. You will add the entire directory to Slicer to start the process. Also included is the intermediary NRRD file for use with the democratiz3D file conversion service. You must be logged into your free embodi3d account to download. To register, click here.

    Free

  9. In this tutorial I will cover some of the basics on working with dicom data with a focus on anatomizing, and reading into medical imaging software as well as how to potentially fix problematic scans. So first of all what is DICOM data? It is a standard file type for basically all medical imaging devices (CT, MRI, US, PET, X-ray, etc), DICOM stands for Digital Imaging and COmmunication in Medicine and along with the file format, and the tags, it is designed to be transferred and stored with PACS. The DICOM standard can be found at their homepage. The useful bits for the purpose of creating anatomical models and particularly values that define the volume geometry can be found in 'tags'. These are in each image/slice header file (metadata). They are two 4 digit hexadecimal values assigned to a particular type of value like: (0018, 0088) Spacing Between Slices To find the official library of these tags go to the standard on the dicom home page and go down to "Part 6: Data Dictionary". When opened scrolling down will reveal just how immense the dicom standard is. Now this library just gives you the tag and the name but not much information about that tag. To get a bit more of a description use Dicom Lookup and type in the tag or name to find more information. Before looking at data a mention on anatomizing data. The goal is to remove any information that can be traced back to the original person without removing other important information like modality, etc... To get an official type of list of these values go to HIPPA and find there de-identification guidance document. In general (pages 7 and 8) remove all names, dates, addresses, times, and other sensitive information like SSN. Now to actually look at the data I have for years used ImageJ which has been updated to Fiji. Open an image from the scan CD and click 'CNTR+I' to open the header file and see what is in there. Fiji (ImageJ) is a very simple and useful program for looking at data. It is mostly made for working in 2D so in that way is kind of outdated compared to modern medical imaging software like 3DSlicer but it still has its place. Fiji can save a stack of images as an nrrd file so if for some reason 3DSlicer doesn't want to load a scan correctly Fiji gives you another option. So as useful as Fiji is; for anonymising and changing the values of tags I would suggest Dicom Browser. I personally use some code in Matlab to automate the process but that is an expensive and cumbersome tool for the average user. Open the folder with the data in Dicom Browser and when the main folder is selected the values from each slice are stacked on top of each other. To anonymise the data select a value and set it to 'clear' Find all relevant information and clear it or change its value to something that can't be traced to the person (like patient A001). This is also where geometrical values like slice thickness can be changed if that is necessary to get a scan to load properly. Once all the values are changed save the new dicom files and open the new ones again in ImageJ just to check that it all worked and that no PID (Patient Identifier Data) was missed. As to fixing data the most common issue I have come across is an incorrect slice spacing which causes the scan to be shrunk or stretched. There are a few values that control this and different programs will use different values. 'SliceThickness' is sometimes used which is bad. The best is to use the 'ImagePositionPatient' which changes for each slice/image. 'SliceSpacing' is often used as well which is better than 'SliceThickness'. If you suspect your slice spacing value is wrong calculate the difference between two consecutive 'ImagePositionPatient' values and check it against the slice spacing if they are not equal something is amiss. Now you have anonymized and potentially fixed data that you can send to a friend, share here on embodi3D or load up in medical imaging software like my favorite 3DSlicer. When dicom data (anonymized or not) is loaded into 3DSlicer and saved to an nrrd file (see Dr. Mike's tutorial) you will have a single volume file which is inherently anonymized. Opening the *.nrrd file in a text editor like notepad++ there are a few lines at the top which are basically your new header file. It is very minimal and doesn't include a great deal of the information that was in the original dicom files like modality, scan type and settings. This is fine if all you want to do is create a model from it but it can be helpful to have other information then what you have in an nrrd file, so anonymized dicom will be better in some situations.
  10. Hello, Does anyone know how to correct "stretched" sagittal and coronal planes in 3D Slicer? The axial plane is normal. According to the Slicer wiki, i think that using the Orient Scalar Volume may solve this but within the Converters module there is only BSpline to deformation field. There is a parameter set for Create new command line, but that's a bit beyond my skillset. I'll attach a screenshot and if anyone has an easy way to solve this i'd love to hear it. If there's a hard way to solve it i'd love to hear it too but feel free to explain like i'm 5. Slicer wiki page: https://www.slicer.org/wiki/Documentation/4.0/Modules/OrientScalarVolume Currently using Slicer 4.5.0-1 Thanks in advance! Roman
  11. Getting from DICOM to 3D printable STL file in 3D Slicer is totally doable...but it is important to learn some fundamental skills in Slicer first if you are not familiar with the program. This tutorial introduces the user to some basic concepts in 3D Slicer and demonstrates how to crop DICOM data in anticipation of segmentation and 3D model creation. (Segmentation and STL file creation are explored in a companion tutorial ) This tutorial is downloadable as a PDF file, 3D Slicer Tutorial.pdf or can be looked through in image/slide format here in the blog 3D Slicer Tutorial.pdf
  12. 90 downloads

    This 3D printable skull created from a CT scan is printable in two halves that fit together. The skull can be opened to reveal the detailed anatomy of the inside of the skull. It can be printed at full size or scaled to your needs (such as the half-size print shown in the photos). The file is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution – NonCommercial – NoDerivs License.

    Free

  13. This excellent article, written in layman's terms, recently appeared in Make Magazine: "3D printing is all around us, opening possibilities for us to do in our garages what traditionally could only be done by large organizations. It’s now possible to 3D-print a model of your own bones, innards, and other anatomical structures starting from a CT scan 3D image, and using only open source software tools. We show you how to do it using a couple of common desktop 3D printers ..."
×
×
  • Create New...