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Found 218 results

  1. Version 1.0.0

    15 downloads

    The ankle joint is a hinged synovial joint with primarily up-and-down movement (plantarflexion and dorsiflexion). However, when the range of motion of the ankle and subtalar joints (talocalcaneal and talocalcaneonavicular) is taken together, the complex functions as a universal joint. The bony architecture of the ankle consists of three bones: the tibia, the fibula, and the talus. The articular surface of the tibia is referred to as the plafond. The medial malleolus is a bony process extending distally off the medial tibia. The distal-most aspect of the fibula is called the lateral malleolus. Together, the malleoli, along with their supporting ligaments, stabilize the talus underneath the tibia. The bony arch formed by the tibial plafond and the two malleoli is referred to as the ankle "mortise" (or talar mortise). The mortise is a rectangular socket. The ankle is composed of three joints: the talocrural joint (also called talotibial joint, tibiotalar joint, talar mortise, talar joint), the subtalar joint (also called talocalcaneal), and the Inferior tibiofibular joint. The joint surface of all bones in the ankle are covered with articular cartilage. This a 3D printable medical file converted from a CT scan DICOM dataset of a 75-year old female.

    Free

  2. Version 1.0.0

    15 downloads

    The ankle joint is a hinged synovial joint with primarily up-and-down movement (plantarflexion and dorsiflexion). However, when the range of motion of the ankle and subtalar joints (talocalcaneal and talocalcaneonavicular) is taken together, the complex functions as a universal joint. The bony architecture of the ankle consists of three bones: the tibia, the fibula, and the talus. The articular surface of the tibia is referred to as the plafond. The medial malleolus is a bony process extending distally off the medial tibia. The distal-most aspect of the fibula is called the lateral malleolus. Together, the malleoli, along with their supporting ligaments, stabilize the talus underneath the tibia. The bony arch formed by the tibial plafond and the two malleoli is referred to as the ankle "mortise" (or talar mortise). The mortise is a rectangular socket. The ankle is composed of three joints: the talocrural joint (also called talotibial joint, tibiotalar joint, talar mortise, talar joint), the subtalar joint (also called talocalcaneal), and the Inferior tibiofibular joint. The joint surface of all bones in the ankle are covered with articular cartilage. This a 3D printable medical file converted from a CT scan DICOM dataset of a 75-year old female.

    Free

  3. Version 1.0.0

    19 downloads

    The bones of the leg and foot form part of the appendicular skeleton that supports the many muscles of the lower limbs. These muscles work together to produce movements such as standing, walking, running, and jumping. At the same time, the bones and joints of the leg and foot must be strong enough to support the body’s weight while remaining flexible enough for movement and balance. The tibia and fibulaare the bones that support the leg. The larger tibia or shinebone is located medial to the fibula and bears most of the weight. At the superior (proximal) end of the tibia, a pair of flattened condyles articulate with the rounded condyles at the distal end of the femur to form the knee joint joint. The tibia and fibula articulate at two sites. At the knee, a superior (proximal) tibiofibular joint is formed by the lateral tibial condyle and head of the fibula. At the ankle, an inferior (distal) tibiofibular joint is formed by the lower fibula and a lateral concavity (notch) on the lower tibia. The feet are flexible structures of bones, joints, muscles, and soft tissues that let us stand upright and perform activities like walking, running, and jumping. The feet are divided into three sections: -The forefoot contains the five toes (phalanges) and the five longer bones (metatarsals). -The midfoot is a pyramid-like collection of bones that form the arches of the feet. These include the three cuneiform bones, the cuboid bone, and the navicular bone. -The hindfoot forms the heel and ankle. The talus bone supports the leg bones (tibia and fibula), forming the ankle. The calcaneus (heel bone) is the largest bone in the foot. This is a 3D printable medical file converted from a CT scan dicom dataset of a 75-year female.

    Free

  4. Version 1.0.0

    17 downloads

    The bones of the leg and foot form part of the appendicular skeleton that supports the many muscles of the lower limbs. These muscles work together to produce movements such as standing, walking, running, and jumping. At the same time, the bones and joints of the leg and foot must be strong enough to support the body’s weight while remaining flexible enough for movement and balance. The tibia and fibulaare the bones that support the leg. The larger tibia or shinebone is located medial to the fibula and bears most of the weight. At the superior (proximal) end of the tibia, a pair of flattened condyles articulate with the rounded condyles at the distal end of the femur to form the knee joint joint. The tibia and fibula articulate at two sites. At the knee, a superior (proximal) tibiofibular joint is formed by the lateral tibial condyle and head of the fibula. At the ankle, an inferior (distal) tibiofibular joint is formed by the lower fibula and a lateral concavity (notch) on the lower tibia. The feet are flexible structures of bones, joints, muscles, and soft tissues that let us stand upright and perform activities like walking, running, and jumping. The feet are divided into three sections: -The forefoot contains the five toes (phalanges) and the five longer bones (metatarsals). -The midfoot is a pyramid-like collection of bones that form the arches of the feet. These include the three cuneiform bones, the cuboid bone, and the navicular bone. -The hindfoot forms the heel and ankle. The talus bone supports the leg bones (tibia and fibula), forming the ankle. The calcaneus (heel bone) is the largest bone in the foot.

    Free

  5. Researchers at UC San Diego have successfully 3D printed a network of blood vessels. This is an important step towards 3D printing an entire organ. Read the full story here.
  6. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    This model is the right thigh muscle rendering of a 49-year-old male with a right medial thigh undifferentiated pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH). The patient underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy treatment and was found to have a high-grade lesion at the time of diagnosis. Metastases to his lungs were also found at diagnosis. The patient is still living with the disease at 2 years since diagnosis. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. Undifferentiated pleomorphic MFH has more recently been classified as Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma. This is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in late adulthood, commonly occurring between 55 to 80 years old and most commonly in Caucasian males. Clinically, it presents as a slowly growing mass in the extremities. Biopsy of the lesion demonstrates, as its name implies, an undifferentiated and pleomorphic appearance. Pleomorphism is the pathologic description of cells and nuclei with variability in size, shape, and staining, which is characteristic of a malignant neoplasm. “Undifferentiated” means that the tissue does not appear like an identifiable tissue structure. Treatment consists of wide resection and radiation. Chemotherapy is added in cases of metastasis, most commonly to the lung. Five-year survival is between 35-60% depending on the grade of tumor and metastases. This model was created from the file STS_021.

    Free

  7. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    This model is the right thigh skin rendering of a 49-year-old male with a right medial thigh undifferentiated pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH). The patient underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy treatment and was found to have a high-grade lesion at the time of diagnosis. Metastases to his lungs were also found at diagnosis. The patient is still living with the disease at 2 years since diagnosis. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. Undifferentiated pleomorphic MFH has more recently been classified as Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma. This is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in late adulthood, commonly occurring between 55 to 80 years old and most commonly in Caucasian males. Clinically, it presents as a slowly growing mass in the extremities. Biopsy of the lesion demonstrates, as its name implies, an undifferentiated and pleomorphic appearance. Pleomorphism is the pathologic description of cells and nuclei with variability in size, shape, and staining, which is characteristic of a malignant neoplasm. “Undifferentiated” means that the tissue does not appear like an identifiable tissue structure. Treatment consists of wide resection and radiation. Chemotherapy is added in cases of metastasis, most commonly to the lung. Five-year survival is between 35-60% depending on the grade of tumor and metastases. This model was created from the file STS_021.

    Free

  8. Version 1.0.0

    2 downloads

    This model is the bilateral lower extremity muscle rendering of a 49-year-old male with a right medial thigh undifferentiated pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH). The patient underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy treatment and was found to have a high-grade lesion at the time of diagnosis. Metastases to his lungs were also found at diagnosis. The patient is still living with the disease at 2 years since diagnosis. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. Undifferentiated pleomorphic MFH has more recently been classified as Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma. This is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in late adulthood, commonly occurring between 55 to 80 years old and most commonly in Caucasian males. Clinically, it presents as a slowly growing mass in the extremities. Biopsy of the lesion demonstrates, as its name implies, an undifferentiated and pleomorphic appearance. Pleomorphism is the pathologic description of cells and nuclei with variability in size, shape, and staining, which is characteristic of a malignant neoplasm. “Undifferentiated” means that the tissue does not appear like an identifiable tissue structure. Treatment consists of wide resection and radiation. Chemotherapy is added in cases of metastasis, most commonly to the lung. Five-year survival is between 35-60% depending on the grade of tumor and metastases. This model was created from the file STS_021.

    Free

  9. Version 1.0.0

    12 downloads

    This is the normal right foot and ankle skin model of a 56-year-old male with right anterior thigh pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. Topographical landmarks of the foot and ankle consist of muscular, tendinous, and bony structures. Proximally, the superficial muscles of the anterior (tibialis anterior), lateral (peroneals) and posterior (gastrocnemius) compartments may be palpated. Anteriorly, the tibialis anterior tendon crosses the ankle joint and is used as a landmark for ankle joint injections and aspirations, where the practitioner will place the needle just lateral to the tendon. Posteriorly, the gastrocnemius and soleus converge to form the Achilles tendon. Ruptures of the tendon, as well as tendinous changes due to Achilles tendinopathy, may be palpated. At the level of the ankle joint, the joint line, medial malleolus (distal tibia) and lateral malleolus (distal fibula) may be palpated. The extensor hallucis longus and extensor digitorum longus tendons are visible on the surface of the dorsal foot. The extensor digitorum brevis muscle belly is seen on the dorsum of the lateral foot. On the plantar foot, the plantar fascia may be palpated. Nodules associated with plantar fascial fibromatosis may be palpated here. Plantar fasciitis is also diagnosed when pain is associated with palpation of the insertion of the plantar fascia on the medial heel. Other common pathologies on the plantar foot are ulcerations associated with diabetic neuropathy and other neuropathic conditions. This model was created from the file STS_014.

    Free

  10. Version 1.0.0

    9 downloads

    This is the normal right foot and ankle skin model of a 56-year-old male with right anterior thigh pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. Topographical landmarks of the foot and ankle consist of muscular, tendinous, and bony structures. Proximally, the superficial muscles of the anterior (tibialis anterior), lateral (peroneals) and posterior (gastrocnemius) compartments may be palpated. Anteriorly, the tibialis anterior tendon crosses the ankle joint and is used as a landmark for ankle joint injections and aspirations, where the practitioner will place the needle just lateral to the tendon. Posteriorly, the gastrocnemius and soleus converge to form the Achilles tendon. Ruptures of the tendon, as well as tendinous changes due to Achilles tendinopathy, may be palpated. At the level of the ankle joint, the joint line, medial malleolus (distal tibia) and lateral malleolus (distal fibula) may be palpated. The extensor hallucis longus and extensor digitorum longus tendons are visible on the surface of the dorsal foot. The extensor digitorum brevis muscle belly is seen on the dorsum of the lateral foot. On the plantar foot, the plantar fascia may be palpated. Nodules associated with plantar fascial fibromatosis may be palpated here. Plantar fasciitis is also diagnosed when pain is associated with palpation of the insertion of the plantar fascia on the medial heel. Other common pathologies on the plantar foot are ulcerations associated with diabetic neuropathy and other neuropathic conditions. This model was created from the file STS_014.

    Free

  11. Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    This is the normal left foot and ankle muscle model of a 56-year-old male with right anterior thigh pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The primary motions of the ankle are dorsiflexion, plantarflexion, inversion, and eversion. However, with the addition of midfoot motion (adduction, and abduction), the foot may supinate (inversion and adduction) or pronate (eversion and abduction). In order to accomplish these motions, muscles outside of the foot (extrinsic) and muscles within the foot (intrinsic) attach throughout the foot, crossing one or more joints. Laterally, the peroneus brevis and tertius attach on the proximal fifth metatarsal to evert the foot. The peroneus longus courses under the cuboid to attach on the plantar surface of the first metatarsal, acting as the primary plantarflexor of the first ray and, secondarily, the foot. Together, these muscles also assist in stabilizing the ankle for patients with deficient lateral ankle ligaments from chronic sprains. Medially, the posterior tibialis inserts on the plantar aspect of the navicular cuneiforms and metatarsal bases, acting primarily to invert the foot and secondarily to plantarflex the foot. The flexor hallucis longus inserts on the base of the distal phalanx of the great toe to plantarflex the great toe, and the flexor digitorum inserts on the bases of the distal phalanges of the lesser four toes, acting to plantarflex the toes. The gastrocnemius inserts on the calcaneus as the Achilles tendon and plantarflexes the foot. Anteriorly, the tibialis anterior inserts on the dorsal medial cuneiform and plantar aspect of the first metatarsal base as the primary ankle dorsiflexor and secondary inverter. The Extensor hallucis longus and extensor digitorum longus insert on the dorsal aspect of the base of the distal phalanges to dorsiflex the great toe and lesser toes, respectively. This model was created from the file STS_014.

    Free

  12. Version 1.0.0

    32 downloads

    This is the normal right foot and ankle muscle model of a 56-year-old male with right anterior thigh pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The primary motions of the ankle are dorsiflexion, plantarflexion, inversion, and eversion. However, with the addition of midfoot motion (adduction, and abduction), the foot may supinate (inversion and adduction) or pronate (eversion and abduction). In order to accomplish these motions, muscles outside of the foot (extrinsic) and muscles within the foot (intrinsic) attach throughout the foot, crossing one or more joints. Laterally, the peroneus brevis and tertius attach on the proximal fifth metatarsal to evert the foot. The peroneus longus courses under the cuboid to attach on the plantar surface of the first metatarsal, acting as the primary plantarflexor of the first ray and, secondarily, the foot. Together, these muscles also assist in stabilizing the ankle for patients with deficient lateral ankle ligaments from chronic sprains. Medially, the posterior tibialis inserts on the plantar aspect of the navicular cuneiforms and metatarsal bases, acting primarily to invert the foot and secondarily to plantarflex the foot. The flexor hallucis longus inserts on the base of the distal phalanx of the great toe to plantarflex the great toe, and the flexor digitorum inserts on the bases of the distal phalanges of the lesser four toes, acting to plantarflex the toes. The gastrocnemius inserts on the calcaneus as the Achilles tendon and plantarflexes the foot. Anteriorly, the tibialis anterior inserts on the dorsal medial cuneiform and plantar aspect of the first metatarsal base as the primary ankle dorsiflexor and secondary inverter. The Extensor hallucis longus and extensor digitorum longus insert on the dorsal aspect of the base of the distal phalanges to dorsiflex the great toe and lesser toes, respectively. This model was created from the file STS_014.

    Free

  13. Version 1.0.0

    8 downloads

    This is the normal right foot and ankle bone model of a 56 year old male with right anterior thigh pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The ankle is a hinge (or ginglymus) joint made of the distal tibia (tibial plafond, medial and posterior malleoli) superiorly and medially, the distal fibula (lateral malleolus) laterally and the talus inferiorly. Together, these structures form the ankle “mortise”, which refers to the bony arch. The normal range of motion is 20 degrees dorsiflexion and 50 degrees plantarflexion. Stability is provided by the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), calcaneofibular ligament (CFL), and posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) laterally, and the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments medially. The ankle is one of my most common sites of musculoskeletal injury, including ankle fractures and ankle sprains, due to the ability of the joint to invert and evert. The most common ligament involved in the ATFL. The foot is commonly divided into three segments: hindfoot, midfoot, and forefoot. These sections are divided by the transverse tarsal joint (between the talus and calcaneus proximally and navicular and cuboid distally), and the tarsometatarsal joint (between the cuboids and cuneiforms proximally and the metatarsals distally). The first tarsometatarsal joint (medially) is termed the “Lisfranc” joint and is the site of the Lisfranc injury seen primarily in athletic injuries. This model was created from the file STS_014.

    Free

  14. Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    This is a case of left thigh posterior mass in a 75-year old female patient. Pathological examination of the specimen revealed spindle shaped cells suggestive of liposarcoma with intermediate grade of malignancy. MRI was done for this patient 33 days before taking the biopsy, and a week after confirming the diagnosis a PET scan was done as a part of the metastatic workup. After performing surgical resection of the tumor followed by radiotherapy, the patient showed no evidence of recurrence for 760 days of follow up. This is a 3D printable medical STL file converted from the real CT scan DICOM dataset of this patient(STS-016).

    Free

  15. Version 1.0.0

    18 downloads

    The knee is the largest joint and one of the most important joints in the body. It plays an essential role in movement related to carrying the body weight in horizontal (running and walking) and vertical (jumping) directions. The knee joint joins the thigh with the leg and consists of two articulations: one between the femur and tibia (tibiofemoral joint), and one between the femur and patella (patellofemoral joint). The knee is a modified hinge joint, which permits flexion and extension as well as slight internal and external rotation. The knee joint is vulnerable to injury and to the development of osteoarthritis. The knee is composed of three functional compartments: the patellofemoral articulation, consisting of the patella, or "kneecap", and the patellar groove on the front of the femur through which it slides; and the medial and lateral tibiofemoral articulations linking the femur, or thigh bone, with the tibia, the main bone of the lower leg. The joint is bathed in synovial fluid which is contained inside the synovial membrane called the joint capsule. This is a 3D-printable medical STL file of normal right knee joint converted from a CT scan DICOM dataset of a 75-year old female patient(STS-016).

    Free

  16. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    This model is the bilateral thigh skin rendering of a 56 year old male with a pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma of the anterior compartment of the right thigh. The patient underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy treatment and was found to have an intermediate grade lesion at the time of diagnosis. However, the tumor metastasized to his lungs, and the patient died 2.5 years after diagnosis. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. Leiomyosarcomas are aggressive soft tissue malignancies that are thought to arise from the smooth muscle cells lining small blood vessels. Pleomorphism is the pathologic description of cells and nuclei with variability in size, shape and staining, which is characteristic of a malignant neoplasm. Pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma is an aggressive form of leiomyosarcoma, accounting for approximately 10% of these tumors. The mean age of occurrence is 58 years old, with a range from 31-89 years. These usually occur in the extremities, but may also present in the retroperitoneum/abdominal cavity, chest/abdominal wall, and, occasionally, the scalp. On biopsy, the definition of pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma is the presence of pleomorphic cells in at last two-thirds of the cut section and at least one section of positive staining for smooth muscle. Treatment is early wide resection of the primary lesion and neo-adjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. Tumors may metastasize to the lung. A large primary tumor and presence in the retroperitoneal cavity are poor predictive factors, and about 65% of patients succumb to the disease. This model was created from the file STS_014.

    Free

  17. Version 1.0.0

    14 downloads

    This is the normal right leg bone model (including foot) of an 82-year-old male. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The leg includes the area between the knee and the ankle and houses the tibia and fibula. The proximal tibia includes the medial plateau (which is concave) and the lateral plateau (which is convex). The Proximal tibia has a 7-10 degree posterior slope. On the anterior proximal tibia, the tibial tuberosity, where the patellar tendon attaches. On the anteromedial surface of the tibia is Gerdy's tubercle, where the sartorius, gracilis, and semitendinosus attach. The distal tibia creates the superior and medial (plafond and medial malleolus) of the ankle joint. The proximal fibula is the attachment for the posterolateral corner structures of the knee joint. The peroneal nerve wraps around the fibular neck. The distal fibula is the lateral malleolus and a common site for ankle fractures. This model was created from the file STS_013.

    Free

  18. Version 1.0.0

    12 downloads

    This is the normal right leg muscle model (including foot) of an 82-year-old male. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The lower leg is divided into four muscle compartments: the anterior, lateral, superficial posterior, and deep posterior compartments. The anterior compartment is made from the dorsiflexors, including the tibialis anterior, extensor hallucis longus (EHL), extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and peroneus tertius, which are innervated by the deep peroneal nerve. The lateral compartment includes the peroneus longus and peroneus brevis, which assist in foot eversion and are innervated by the superficial peroneal nerve. The superficial posterior compartment include the gastrocnemius, soleus, and plantaris, which assist in plantarflexion and are innervated by the tibial nerve. The deep posterior compartment is made up of the popliteus, flexor hallucis longus (FHL), flexor digitorum longus (FDL), and tibialis posterior, which mostly assist in plantarflexion and are innervated similarly by the tibial nerve. This file was created from the file STS_013.

    Free

  19. Version 1.0.0

    34 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file contains a model of the bones of the pelvis and sacrum was derived from a real medical CT scan. This model was created using the embodi3D free online 3D model creation service.

    Free

  20. Stratasys is helping to sponsor a randomized clinical trial to determine the effectiveness of 3d printed heart models for pediatric congenital heart surgery. Read the full story here.
  21. 3D printing technologies have opened up the capabilities for customization in a wide variety of applications in the medical field. Using bio-compatible and drug-contact materials, medical devices can be produced that are perfectly suited for a particular individual. Another trend enabled by 3D printing is mass customization, in that multiple individualized items can be produced simultaneously, saving time and energy while improving manufacturing efficiency. 3D printers are used to manufacture a variety of medical devices, including those with complex geometry or features that match a patient’s unique anatomy. Some devices are printed from a standard design to make multiple identical copies of the same device. Other devices, called patient-matched or patient-specific devices, are created from a specific patient’s imaging data. Commercially available 3D printed medical devices include: Instrumentation (e.g., guides to assist with proper surgical placement of a device) Implants (e.g., cranial plates or hip joints) External prostheses (e.g., hands) Prescription Glasses Hearing Aids In summary, the 3D Printing medical device market looks exciting and promising, Various Reports and surveys suggest the unexpected growth and demand for 3D Printing in medical device industry and it is expected to blossom more but a number of existing application areas for 3D printing in healthcare sector require specialized materials that meet rigid and stringent bio-compatibility standards, Future 3D printing applications for the medical device field will certainly emerge with the development of suitable additional materials for diagnostic and therapeutic use that meet CE and FDA guidelines.
  22. Cardiologists in Aalst, Belgium, 3D printed the hearts of two patients for preprocedural planning in the treatment of arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat). There are different types of arrhythmia and treatment thereof varies. Some conditions don’t require any treatment, while others call for medication or surgical procedures. One minimally invasive procedure is catheter ablation. During this procedure, a catheter delivers high-frequency electrical energy to a small area of tissue inside the heart that causes the abnormal heart rhythm. This energy scars the tissue, thus destroying the electrical pathway that causes the abnormality. Typically, each pathway needs to be disabled individually. Drs. Tom De Potter and Peter Geelen developed a new, more efficient ablation technique to treat arrhythmia. They now can treat the affected tissue in its entirety, rather than pathway by pathway. Given that everyone’s heart anatomy is different and the risks involved in using a new technique, they had their patients’ hearts 3D printed from a CT scan to practice, customize and perfect their technique. For updates on news and new blog entries, follow us on Twitter at @Embodi3D. Photo credit: http://www.hartcentrumaalst.be/nieuws
  23. The 3D printing technology has proven its benefits to the field of medicine. Recently, researchers from the Japanese company Fasotec created realistic 3D printed models of lungs based on the patented technology called Biotexture Wet Models. This particular technology allows surgeons as well as medical students to practice surgical training on almost realistic lungs that do not only have textures similar to real lungs but also comes complete with blood vessels. The reason for the development of realistic 3D printed lungs is to allow students to practice for real life surgical experience. Currently, the 3D printed realistic lungs are used at Jikei University Hospital in Tokyo. The lungs are made by creating the 3D-printed model shells. The shells are hard and empty and then are filled with gel to make up the synthetic replica of human lungs. The doctors then make the final touches to make the model look as real as a human organ as possible. Tomohiro Kinoshita, one of the researchers who developed the Biotexture Wet Models, said that this new innovation in 3D printing lets doctors and students experience the softness of real organs and see them bleed. With the almost realistic experience provided by such a 3D printed organ, both doctors and students will be able to improve their skills even before they go to the operating room. This futuristic technology provided by 3D printing looks very promising and Fasotec is not only geared towards developing realistic lung models but also other organs such as the heart, kidney and liver.
  24. Very few infectious diseases in recent years have commanded the kind of attention and concern that Zika Virus has. Although Zika outbreaks have been reported in Africa, Southeast Asia and other parts of the world since the 1952, recent announcement by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirming its link with microcephaly has forced everyone to sit up and take notice. The CDC estimates that the current pandemic is widespread with at least 50 countries reporting active Zika transmissions at this time. Most people with Zika virus infection will not have any symptoms though some may experience mild fever, conjunctivitis, muscle and joint pain, and headaches. The virus is primarily transmitted by the Aedes mosquito. However, pregnant women may pass the infection to their babies, which may lead to microcephaly, a neurological condition associated with an abnormally small brain in the infant. The condition can lead to birth defects ranging from hearing loss to poor vision and impaired growth. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of Zika virus infections in pregnant women can, nonetheless, lower the risk of microcephaly to a great extent. Researchers have, therefore, put in a lot of time, money and effort to find a solution, and as always, three-dimensional (3D) medical printing and bioprinting technologies are leading the way. Understanding the Disease To begin with, 3D printing has played a crucial role in conclusively establishing the link between Zika virus and microcephaly. Researchers at John Hopkins Medicine used 3D bioprinting technology to develop realistic models of brain that revealed how the virus infects specialized stem cells in the outer layers of the organ, also known as the cortex. The bioprinted models allowed researchers to study the effects of Zika exposure on fetal brain during different stages of pregnancy. The models are also helping the scientists with drug testing, which is the obvious next stage of their research. Zika Test Kit Engineers at Penn’s School of Engineering and Applied Science, under the leadership of Professor Changchun Liu and Professor Haim Bau, have developed a simple genetic testing device that helps detect Zika virus in saliva samples. It consists of an embedded genetic assay chip that identifies the virus and turns the color of the paper in the 3D printed lid of the device to blue. This can prompt healthcare professionals to send the patient for further testing and to initiate treatment. Unlike other Zika testing techniques, this screening method does not require complex lab equipment. Each device costs about $2, making Zika screening accessible to pregnant women from the poorest parts of the world. Treating Microcephaly The scientists at the Autonomous University of the State of Morelos (UAEM) in Mexico are relying on the additive printing technology to create a microvalve that may help treat microcephaly in infants. The valve reduces the impact of the neurological disease and slows its progression by draining out excessive cerebrospinal fluid associated with this disorder. It can be inserted into the infant brain through a small incision to relieve fluid pressure and provide space for normal development. Researchers estimate the device will be available for patient use by 2017. These examples clearly demonstrate the impact of 3D printing on every aspect of the fight against Zika virus from diagnosing the disease to treating it. The results have been extremely promising, and both researchers and healthcare professionals are immensely hopeful that additive printing technology will help them overcome the infection quickly and effectively.
  25. Version 1.0.0

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    These congenital heart defect STL files demonstrate Partial Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return (PAPVR). In PAPVR, one or two of the pulmonary veins returns blood to the right atrium instead of the left atrium. This causes oxygen-rich blood to flow back to the lungs instead of on to the rest of the body. Because some oxygen-rich blood is continually flowing between the lungs and the right atrium, the right chambers of the heart may become dilated. Over time, this may cause an abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia). In addition, too much blood flow to the lungs may increase the pressure in the lung's blood vessels, leading to a condition called pulmonary hypertension. If only one of the pulmonary veins is affected by the disorder, there may not be any symptoms. If two of the veins are affected, there may be shortness of breath during heavy exercise. Aortic coarctation is also present. Coarctation of the aorta is a narrowing of the aorta, the main blood vessel carrying oxygen-rich blood from the left ventricle of the heart to all of the organs of the body. Coarctation occurs most commonly in a short segment of the aorta just beyond where the arteries to the head and arms take off, as the aorta arches inferiorly toward the chest and abdomen. There are three STL files for 3D printing this model in slices. A whole model STL file is also available for 3D printing. Demonstrated is a bicuspid aortic valve and history of coarctation repair within the first week of life by end to end anastomosis. MRI obtained for evaluation of distal arch. MRI findings: • PAPVR of left upper lobe to innominate vein: Qp:Qs of 1.4:1 • Mild residual narrowing of second transverse segment of the aortic arch. • Moderate post-stenotic dilation of aorta MRI images obtained at end-systole due to tachycardic heart rate during exam. RV End-systolic volume is 36.3 ml. LV End-systolic volume is 30.06 ml. MRI methods: A GE 1.5T HDxt system was used for the 3D HEART sequence which used a 3D respiratory-navigated balanced SSFP (steady state free precession) multi-slab sequence with T2 preparation that provides whole heart coverage with high contrast-to-noise ratio between vessels and myocardium. Due to the relatively fast heart rate of 122 bpm, the fat saturation was turned off to decrease the time needed for the prepatory pulse brining the acquisition window earlier into the cardiac cycle so that it could be centered on the quiescent stage of end systole. The sequence was run with the following parameters: TR 3.4, TE 1.4, Freq 224, Phase 160, RR 8, and fat sat off. Learning: The MRI identified previously un-diagnosed partial anomalous pulmonary venous return. However, the Qp:Qs fell within acceptable left to right shunting of < 1.5:1 and there was insignificant RV, RA enlargement. The MRI evaluation of the coarctation repair revealed a good repair with only mild narrowing, which appeared more severe by echo due to the post-stenotic dilation. Disclaimer: The available model has been validated to demonstrate the case’s pathologic features on a Z450 3D printer, (3DSystems, Circle Rock Hill, South Carolina)(or other printer as appropriate). While the mask applied to the original DICOM images accurately represents the anatomic features, some anatomic detail may be lost due to thin walled structures or inadequate supporting architecture; while other anatomic detail may be added due to similar limitations resulting in bleeding of modeling materials into small negative spaces. However, intracardiac structures, relationships, and pathologic features represent anatomic findings to scale and in high detail. Credit: The model is provided for distribution on Embodi3D with the permission of the author, pediatric cardiologist Dr. Matthew Bramlet, MD, and is part of the Congenital Heart Defects library. We thank Dr. Bramlet and all others who are working to help children with congenital heart problems lead normal and happy lives. It is distributed by Dr. Bramlet under the Creative Commons license Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs. Please respect the terms of the licensing agreement.

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