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Found 224 results

  1. 222 downloads

    This anatomically accurate mandible bone (jawbone) was created by Dr. Marco Vettorello, who has graciously given permission to share it here. The mandible forms the lower jaw. It is connected to the rest of skull at the temporomandibular joint. The file is in STL format and compressed with ZIP. This file is also available here.

    Free

  2. 35 downloads

    This anatomically accurate right maxillary bone was created by Dr. Marco Vettorello, who has graciously given permission to share it here. You can see the teeth in the upper jaw, and how the maxillary bone forms part of the eye socket and the nasal cavity. The file is in STL format and compressed with ZIP. This file is also available here.

    Free

  3. Michael Balzer was a man who was well-versed with 3D printing. He is also the brains behind the site known as “All Things 3D.” He was also the man whose wife was diagnosed with, meningioma, a brain tumor. The news came as a shock to them in late 2013. With Michael’s background on 3D printing, he wasted no time in creating 3D renderings of his wife’s brain scan. He even urged his wife to go on another CT with contrast to make sure that he had all the needed data to create an exact replica of his wife’s brain. Satisfactorily, the CT scan with contrast provided a more detailed data of his wife’s brain structures and the 3.5-cm meningioma. Now, the next thing that must be done was to look for a neurosurgeon that was willing to use his 3D printed models to help create a method of brain surgery that’s minimally invasive. This took 3 months. Finally, they were able to narrow their search to the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. By the middle of May of 2014, Michael’s wife was undergoing an 8-hour brain surgery. Instead of using the old fashioned way of brain surgery which was to remove 1/3 of her skull leaving her with long-lasting problems like loss of sight on the left eye, loss of smell or taste or all of the above. To make the process minimally invasive, what the surgeon did was to operate through the wife’s upper eyelid. The results were incredible. As much as 95% of the growth was removed and in just a matter of 3-weeks, Michael’s wife was able to return to her normal life and was in fact already back to work.
  4. A two week old baby, with a complicated heart problem that required an equally complicated surgery, in a New York hospital has been saved with the help of a 3D printed heart. At the Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital in New York City, the baby’s heart was 3D printed with the help of an MRI scan data. The baby was suffering from coronary heart disease (CHD). Commonly with CHD, the heart is riddled with holes—this is likewise true of the baby’s heart but what made the condition worse was that the baby’s heart was also structured unusually. The heart of the baby was like a maze with its unusual formation that required complicated heart surgery. In a normal operation, the first time that the surgeon gets to see the heart is during the surgery itself. The heart needs to be stopped and that’s the time the surgeon can look inside and decide what needs to be done. And with this kind of operation technique, subsequent surgeries would be needed too. However, with the help of 3D printing, doctors like Dr. Emile Bacha, who accomplished the surgery on the baby, can have the opportunity to take a look at the patient’s heart beforehand, have enough time to study it and make a surgical plan. The surgery went smoothly and Dr. Bacha was able to repair the baby’s heart with just one operation, with a big thanks to 3D printing. The project was funded by a Connecticut based foundation, the Matthew’s Hearts of Hope.
  5. Garrett Peterson is an 18-month old baby who has never been to his home because of a medical condition known as Tetralogy of Fallot with a missing pulmonary valve. This condition places a great deal of pressure on the baby’s airways. And worse is, the condition led to the development of tracheobronchomalacia which is the softening of the bronchi and trachea thereby causing his airways to become tiny slits. With this condition, baby Garrett has lived all his life attached to a ventilator in a hospital bed. Even though baby Garrett was provided with maximum ventilator pressure levels, he showed no signs of improvement; thus, leading to the decision to put him in an induced coma so that the vent won’t work against his declining health. Through the efforts of Dr. Scott Hollister and Dr. Glenn Green of the University of Michigan, who were given clearance by the FDA to create and plant a bioprinted tracheal splint that’s made of polycaprolactone. The created splint was customized to fit baby Garrett’s bronchi with the help of a CT scan of his bronchi and trachea. The surgery was done by a Pediatric Cardiovascular Surgeon of the C.S. Mott, Dr. Richard G. Ohye and was assisted by Dr. Green. They performed the surgery by attaching two implants on two places of the baby’s airway. This will lend support to expand the baby’s airways and further support proper growth. Splints were also attached to the baby’s right and left bronchi. With the success of the operation, the prognosis is good and baby Garrett is now able to ventilate both lungs at a lesser vent pressure. The bioprinted splints implanted were estimated to be reabsorbed by the body within three years’ time. Now Garrett Peterson can go home.
  6. 213 downloads

    3D printable skull of a T-Rex. The model comes with a base and stand. Files available in both STL and Blender format. This model is shared under the Creative Commons Attribution - Share Alike license and was created by MakerBot Academy and posted here.

    Free

  7. 78 downloads

    3D printable skull of a saber-toothed cat. Files available in both STL and Blender format. This model is shared under the Creative Commons Attribution - Share Alike license and was created by MakerBot Studio and posted here.

    Free

  8. From the album: Models

    © 2014 Embodi3D.com

  9. From the album: Models

    © 2014 Embodi3D.com

  10. From the album: Models

    © 2014 Embodi3D.com

  11. From the album: Models

    © 2014 Embodi3D.com

  12. With the combined efforts of the Bristol Robotics Laboratory and the researchers from the University of Bath (Department of Chemical Engineering), they have created a water sensor through 3D printing that can check the water system’s safety levels for consumption. The device created by the researchers can provide round the clock water quality assessment which is a useful tool for people in the developing world to ensure that their drinking water is safe. With the help of a 3d printer, the researchers created a fuel cell like device. They filled it up with bacteria that are contained within the fuel cell. Within the device the bacteria are allowed to flourish and with their proliferation they emit tiny but measurable electrical charges. Once the bacteria inside the fuel cell like apparatus come in contact with contaminated water, there is a consequent change in the electrical charge that they emit, thus alerting people that their current water source is not fit for drinking. Within the settings of the laboratory, the device was able to identify toxic pollutants in the water like cadmium. Cadmium is a well-known waste element of the electronics industry and when consumed can cause cancer and several other health problems. What is wonderful about this invention is that the results can be seen right away. The bacteria within the fuel cell are likened to a canary within mine shafts that are very sensitive to changes in the air. This then alerts the miners to get out of the mine right away—the same is true for this invention. It is a better assessor of drinking water’s cleanliness in real time without having to take water samples at each time of the day and be studied in the lab.
  13. Dr. Mike

    038 small

    From the album: Models

    Half-size 3D printable web skull, printed with nylon selective laser sintering.

    © Copyright 2014 Embodi3D.com, Embodi3D LLC

  14. Dr. Mike

    035 small

    From the album: Models

    Half-size 3D printable web skull, printed with nylon selective laser sintering.

    © Copyright 2014 Embodi3D.com, Embodi3D LLC

  15. Dr. Mike

    029 small

    From the album: Models

    Half-size 3D printable web skull, printed with nylon selective laser sintering.

    © Copyright 2014 Embodi3D.com, Embodi3D LLC

  16. Dr. Mike

    028 small

    From the album: Models

    Half-size 3D printable web skull, printed with nylon selective laser sintering.

    © Copyright 2014 Embodi3D.com, Embodi3D LLC

  17. Dr. Mike

    026 small

    From the album: Models

    Half-size 3D printable web skull, printed with nylon selective laser sintering.

    © Copyright 2014 Embodi3D.com, Embodi3D LLC

  18. Dr. Mike

    023 small

    From the album: Models

    Half-size 3D printable web skull, printed with nylon selective laser sintering.

    © Copyright 2014 Embodi3D.com, Embodi3D LLC

  19. Dr. Mike

    020 small

    From the album: Models

    Half-size 3D printable web skull, printed with nylon selective laser sintering. Close up of eyes.

    © Copyright 2014 Embodi3D.com, Embodi3D LLC

  20. Dr. Mike

    Web skull 4

    From the album: Blog images

    © Copyright 2014 Embodi3D LLC, all rights reserved

  21. Dr. Mike

    Web skull 3

    From the album: Blog images

    © Copyright 2014 Embodi3D LLC, all rights reserved

  22. Dr. Mike

    Web skull 2

    From the album: Blog images

    © Copyright 2014 Embodi3D LLC, all rights reserved

  23. Dr. Mike

    Web skull 1

    From the album: Blog images

    © Copyright 2014 Embodi3D LLC, all rights reserved

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