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Angel Sosa

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  1. Meet Selami Ekinci, he´s an Architect and lives in Turkey/Ankara. Since last year, He works as a freelance at home office so he has lot of time to have fun with 3D Medical software, modellings and presentations. 1. What motivated you to work with 3D printing? In the beginning My Sister (She is a child surgeon) asked me if I could draw 3D Model tumor and calculate its volume. After a successful work of it, doctors wanted 3D Model to see relation with vessels, vein, aorta and tumor for difficult patients. They made lots of pre-surgery plan with these 3D works, and said which were very helpful. That was the motivation being part of it. 2. Which 3D model do you consider is your best contribution so far and why? Generally tumor models asked for me in real life. With those 3D works, operations done faster, lower risk, cheaper and high success. But what I believe is, any 3D work in this platform has contribution for 3D printing and Augmented Reality in this platform. Skull base example Spine example 3. How is 3D printing useful for your daily work? 3D printing has a lots of advantage my doctor friends daily work. I guess I explained how, but not enough for now. It’s like driver airbag was optional 25 years ago, which six of them are standard now. 3D printing may be rare for now, but will be asked for standard operations in future. Spine and vascular example 4. What do you recommend to whom is starting in the 3D medical printing world? As an Architect, I have an huge advantage in 3D modeling which has same principles 3D medical printing. There are lots of tutorials about modeling an object etc. with a 3D modeling software like blender. If you understand basics to design an 3D object, this will be very helpful to segmentation CT&MR to create 3D printable model. Best wishes, Selami Angel Sosa A Radiologist who´s passionate about AI and imaging in any form. From x rays, ultrasound to CT, MR and 3d printing. Likes photography, music, and video games.
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    Brain tumor - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans.

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  3. Version 1.0.0

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    Bone, ct, scan, without, contrast, .stl, 3d, model, axial, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital, ethmoid, cells, nasal, septum, lower, turbinate, petrous, ridge, cerebellum, paranasal, sinuses, maxillary, sinus, sphenoid, orbit, mastoid, clinoid, apophysis, optic, nerve

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  4. This month Embodi3d Top Member is Antonia Pontiki. She´s a PhD student in Biomedical Engineering at King's College in London investigating the use of patient-specific 3D printing for thoracic surgery. Her research interests include chest wall reconstruction for cancer patients, 3D printing, biocompatible materials, thoracic prostheses, and surgical simulators. So let's get to know her a little better! 1. What motivated you to work with 3D printing? I am doing a PhD in Biomedical Engineering and I have been working on 3D printing since my final year of my BEng degree. My supervisor offered me a project for my BEng final year thesis, which involved 3D printing for the production of patient specific implants. Since then, I became increasingly interested in the use of 3D printing in healthcare and how it can improve people's lives. I have been collaborating with a thoracic surgeon for the past 4 years, investigating the use of 3D printing in thoracic surgery. 2. Which 3D model do consider is your best contribution so far and why? From the models I have uploaded on this platform, the full human intestine looks like the one that has attracted the most attention and is the most "used". I believe this is because it is a quite intricate structure and hard to generate in such detail even using a scan. However, in terms of real life contribution, it would have to be the lung hilum. That is because that model is part of a project that will, hopefully, soon be clinically translated and have an impact in healthcare and medical education! Full Intestine 3D model 3. How is 3D printing useful for your daily work? As I mentioned above, 3D printing is my daily work. My PhD is probably around 70% printing and I spend my days researching and testing new materials and new techniques to produce medical implants using 3D printing. I also teach undergraduate students 3D printing and its applications in healthcare, and I assist other researchers in our department with 3D printing parts required for their work. Model of a human, male, adult thorax 4. What do you recommend to whom is starting in the 3D medical printing world? In the past few years, 3D printing technologies are rapidly advancing to the point that it's hard to keep up and always be up to date with all the new research. The possibilities are endless with 3D printing, and especially in healthcare I believe that we can make a big difference, and have an impact on society by using 3D printing to the maximum of its abilities to improve patient care and quality of life, and also help with the education and skills of clinicians. Best wishes, Antonia Three-Dimensional Printing for ChestWall Reconstruction in Thoracic Surgery: Building on Experience You can check her publications here: 1. Smelt J, Pontiki A, Jahangiri M, Rhode K, Nair A, Bille A. Three-Dimensional Printing for Chest Wall Reconstruction in Thoracic Surgery: Building on Experience. Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2020 Jun 1;68:352-6. 2. Arar Y, Reddy SR, Kim H, Dimas VV, Zellers TM, Abou Zahr R, Vamsee R, Greer JS, Tandon A, Pontiki A, Dillenbeck J. 3D advanced imaging overlay with rapid registration in CHD to reduce radiation and assist cardiac catheterisation interventions. Cardiology in the Young. 2020 May;30(5):656-62. 3. Mustaev M, Bille A, Hasan M, Garg S, Pontiki AA, Darwish O, Lucchese G. Simulation and Measurement of Aerosolisation in Different Chest Drainage Systems. InSeminars in Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 2020 Nov 7. WB Saunders. 4. Emore M, Pontiki A, Rhode K. Surgical repair of the orbital floor using patient-specific 3D printing. British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. 2020 Dec 1;58(10):e182-3. Angel Sosa A Radiologist who´s passionate about AI and imaging in any form. From x rays, ultrasound to CT, MR and 3d printing. Likes photography, music, and video games.
  5. Background: Frank Bonelli is an American practitioner, board certified in Diagnostic Radiology, with CAQ in Neuroradiology. He is fortunate to have access to a variety of CT and MRI scans. He has several printers: a Prusa i3 MK2, a Prusa MK3, a SeeMeCNC Artemis 300 (great for large long prints like femurs) and a Elegoo Mars resin printer. He has really been interested in how close “off the shelf” prosumer printers can accurately print medical models. He occasionally teach students how to process and ultimately print from imaging, and he has written up some guides and tricks (such as support placement) to make the printing process successful. What motivated you to work with 3D printing? My introduction to 3D printing was entirely accidental. My youngest son, a Sophomore in high school at the time, had always wanted a printer to print “stuff”, so we finally settled on a Prusa i3 MK2 kit. We built it together, but he really lost interest after the building phase, so there it sat. I printed out a few gadgets for my cameras and some figurines, but I wasn’t really getting into the 3D print groove. Then I thought, what if I can print something from a CT scan? I started simple, with a CT scan of an elbow. I learned to segment with 3D slicer, learned Meshmixer for post-processing, and simplify 3D to make the final product. Suddenly, I was printing everything I could get my hands on. It has become a mild addiction and my home and work office contain hundreds (literally) of prints of a variety of normal and pathologic body parts. Which 3D model do you consider is your best contribution so far and why? Unexpectedly, it’s the cervical spine model with intervertebral discs. Not sure why it’s so popular. Maybe because it makes a great anatomical teaching model. How is 3D printing useful in your daily work? I don’t directly apply 3D printing in my daily work. Occasionally, I will print up a complex case (say a complex fracture) for a colleague because they are interested and know I print, but not for clinical planning. I believe the real usefulness is from an education standpoint. Segmenting a model and examining the resultant 3D print really hones ones’ anatomic skills. Complex fractures, particularly of the face, take on a new meaning beyond looking at a 3D image on a computer screen when one can hold the model in ones’ hands. In addition, one can print a huge variety of both normal and anatomic pathology. It’s cool to see how a spine with ankylosing spondylitis really looks. What do you recommend to whom is starting in the 3D medical printing world? You’ll need access to a 3D printer and .nrrd CT files if you want to start at the beginning of the process. 3D slicer (for segmentation) is free, and once you learn it, is relatively easy to use. Meshmixer (to refine the model’s mesh) is free as well. Finally, one needs a good program to accurately convert .stl files to gcode. Start small and easy: printing normal simple bones like portions of the elbow or knee are a good first start. Learn to segment the bones quickly and accurately, and learn the quirks of segmentation and how they apply to printing. Then move on to something more complex (print a fracture – how will you demonstrate the fracture fragments in a print when they are displaced?). Finally, move on to complex structures, learning to segment soft tissue, bone, etc. Experiment with different print materials. For non-treatment planning purposes (education or just because it’s fun), you can print virtually anything using an off the shelf printer (like a Prusa) and obtain a very realistic, accurate model. Regards, Frank About author Angel Sosa A Radiologist who´s passionate about AI and imaging in any form. From x rays, ultrasound to CT, MR and 3d printing. Likes photography, music, and video games.
  6. This month we are going to meet Vjekoslav Kopacin @kopachini. Dr. Kopacin is a radiologist in the University Hospital Osijek, Croatia, interested and practicing Interventional Radiology. He also works at local Faculty of Medicine, Osijek at Department of Biophysics and Radiology who has incorporated the use of 3d printing in his daily practice and gave us his time to answer this interview to share his experience since its inception and share some advice to those who are starting in this world of 3d printing 1. What motivated you to work with 3D printing? I started with 3D printing by accident. I was finishing my first year of radiology residency and while chatting with one of the experienced radiologist and another older colleague resident, on CT working station was VRT reconstruction of the skeleton and it came on my mind could it be 3D printed. They didn't know the answer and me at that time knew about 3D printing only what I have heard from the media (to be exact: machine similar to Star Trek replicator). One or two months later there was an article about 3D printing in medicine in Radiology journal and I started to read and learn (I always joke that was the stroke of destiny). Not long after I discovered embodi3d (to be honest, my wife found it on the internet ) and it opened more educating articles, tutorials, and new horizons and possibilities of 3d printing in medicine, so I took a bite even more. My motivation for 3D printing is, as a radiologist, to bring untouchable anatomy from the screen to become tangible in real life so the clinicians could prepare for more complex operations. Also, I have connected with some great maxillo-facial surgeons in my hospital who were open to novel techniques, and we all together, with a help of one really smart computer science student whom I call Blender wizard Luka, started to make personalized osteotomy guides from scratch for free fibula flab mandibular reconstruction using open source software and with low and acceptable finances - something I was told that it is not possible to do if you don't have expensive equipment several years before. That was/is my main motivation - to do something or produce with low as possible finances and limited equipment and software. 2. Which 3D model do consider is your best contribution so far and why? It is hard to single out one model, but I consider a model of palatine bone to point out because in the "sea" of bone models I couldn't find a palatine bone to 3D print for my friend's anatomy class. There was one but it had a low polygonal surface and I wasn't satisfied with it so I segmented one and it is now downloadable at embodi3d model library. Further on, there was a model of the neonatal heart with a rare congenital anomaly performed on 512 slice CT that had me stoked, another rare congenital anomaly of maxillar and mandibular fusion. Also, our every model of the personalized surgical guide has a great contribution in patient treatment outcome, so I am very proud of those models, too. 3. How is 3D printing useful for your daily work? As a radiologist interested in interventional radiology, throughout segmentation and 3D printing I am still learning radiological anatomy and pathoanatomy of different body regions like small bones of viscerocranium (segmentation of palatine bone), pediatric congenital heart anomalies as in my hospital we don't have experience in that field, etc. Also, I am eager to bring interventional radiology to medical students, as well as fellow residents, so I making a training model for the introduction and practice of some procedures like basic vascular approach using the Seldinger technique, catheter selection, and approach, etc. My Ph.D. project is also based on 3D printing in radiology and medical physics, so, overall, I think 3D printing is really incorporated into my daily routine and it will stay that way, for sure. 4. What do you recommend to whom is starting in the 3D medical printing world? Nothing is impossible, you just have to find a way and a will. Knowledge is several keystrokes away and nowadays it is closer than ever before. Find good literature and read, find good video tutorials (like ones on embodi3d web-page) and learn, join online communities who are willing to help (like this one) and you will master the art of medical 3D printing. On the way, you will encounter envious people who will try to slow you down, but don't get intimidated, if there is will - there is a way. If you are low with finances before any move, read, study, and don't be afraid to ask for advice. Promote your work, success, and possibilities of 3D printing in medicine to your local medical or even non-medical community, that way you will find open-minded people interested in new techniques and projects will start coming. Good luck About author Angel Sosa A Radiologist who´s passionate about AI and imaging in any form. From x rays, ultrasound to CT, MR and 3d printing. Likes photography, music, and video games.
  7. Great work! you can cut the table using 3d slicer (1) New "Surface cut" and "Mask volume" tools for 3D Slicer segment editor - YouTube Regards, Angel S
  8. Second month of 2021 is almost over and it is time for us to continue meeting our Embodi3D Top Members. Last month we met Prof. Valchanov, who is He is part of the Department of Anatomy and Cell biology at the Medical University of Varna, Bulgaria you can read more about him here. This month we are meeting Dr. Frank Bonelli He is a practicing neuroradiologist in a community-based setting. He considers himself fortunate to have access to a variety of CT and MRI scans. He has several printers: a Prusa i3 MK2, a Prusa MK3, a SeeMeCNC Artemis 300 (great for large long prints like femurs) and a Elegoo Mars resin printer. He has really been interested in how close “off the shelf” prosumer printers can accurately print medical models. He occasionally teaches students how to process and ultimately print from imaging, and I have written up some guides and tricks (such as support placement) to make the printing process successful. So let's get to know a little bit about Dr. Bonelli and his interest for 3D medical printing. What motivated you to work with 3D printing? My introduction to 3D printing was entirely accidental. My youngest son, a Sophomore in high school at the time, had always wanted a printer to print “stuff”, so we finally settled on a Prusa i3 MK2 kit. We built it together, but he really lost interest after the building phase, so there it sat. I printed out a few gadgets for my cameras and some figurines, but I wasn’t really getting into the 3D print groove. Then I thought, what if I can print something from a CT scan? I started simple, with a CT scan of an elbow. I learned to segment with 3D slicer, learned Meshmixer for post-processing, and simplify 3D to make the final product. Suddenly, I was printing everything I could get my hands on. It has become a mild addiction and my home and work office contain hundreds (literally) of prints of a variety of normal and pathologic body parts. Which 3D model do you consider is your best contribution so far and why? Unexpectedly, it’s the cervical spine model with intervertebral discs. Not sure why it’s so popular. Maybe because it makes a great anatomical teaching model. How is 3D printing useful in your daily work? I don’t directly apply 3D printing in my daily work. Occasionally, I will print up a complex case (say a complex fracture) for a colleague because they are interested and know I print, but not for clinical planning. I believe the real usefulness is from an education standpoint. Segmenting a model and examining the resultant 3D print really hones ones’ anatomic skills. Complex fractures, particularly of the face, take on a new meaning beyond looking at a 3D image on a computer screen when one can hold the model in ones’ hands. In addition, one can print a huge variety of both normal and anatomic pathology. It’s cool to see how a spine with ankylosing spondylitis really looks. What do you recommend to whom is starting in the 3D medical printing world? You’ll need access to a 3D printer and .nrrd CT files if you want to start at the beginning of the process. 3D slicer (for segmentation) is free, and once you learn it, is relatively easy to use. Meshmixer (to refine the model’s mesh) is free as well. Finally, one needs a good program to accurately convert .stl files to gcode. Start small and easy: printing normal simple bones like portions of the elbow or knee are a good first start. Learn to segment the bones quickly and accurately, and learn the quirks of segmentation and how they apply to printing. Then move on to something more complex (print a fracture – how will you demonstrate the fracture fragments in a print when they are displaced?). Finally, move on to complex structures, learning to segment soft tissue, bone, etc. Experiment with different print materials. For non-treatment planning purposes (education or just because it’s fun), you can print virtually anything using an off the shelf printer (like a Prusa) and obtain a very realistic, accurate model. About author Angel Sosa A Radiologist who´s passionate about AI and imaging in any form. From x rays, ultrasound to CT, MR and 3d printing. Likes photography, music, and video games.
  9. Thanks for sharing these high-detail anatomical models! Many students visit Embodi3D and this type of models is very useful to them. About your questions, maybe Prof. @valchanov and @Dr. Mike could help you.
  10. Embodi3d´s Top Contributors: Meet Petar Valchanov In this new monthly section you will meet our Top contributors. They are the active members of embodi3D and have uploaded Top 3D models This month we would like you to meet Asst. Prof. Petar Valchanov, MD, He is part of the Department of Anatomy and Cell biology at the Medical University of Varna, Bulgaria So let's get to know a little bit about Prof. Valchanov and his interest for 3D medical printing. 1. What motivated you to work with 3D printing? Currently, I'm working as a scientist, but I was a primary care physician for more than 12 years. The medical 3D modelling and 3D printing gives me the opportunity to be useful for the patients, but on much larger scale, and I don't have to do night shifts, medical exams and manipulations anymore. 2. Which 3D model do consider is your best contribution so far and why? The nasal cavities, the aortas, the bone 3d models - they are very good in the demonstration of anatomical variations and let's face it - the anatomical variations are a real issue in the clinic and their better presentation changes the outcome for a lot of patients. But my most favorite contribution is the heart box - it´s just the perfect gift for a medical practitioner. 3. How is 3D printing useful for your daily work? It gives me the ability to present all my ideas as physical object. Its much easier to get funding on my projects, when they are 3d printed as nice, shiny, informative 3d models. 4. What do you recommend to whom is starting in the 3D medical printing world? First, find a good and useful workflow with software, which you can afford. Then, start with simple bone models, then aortas and finally - skulls. Print some souvenir models for your fellow doctors and several demo models of the structures, which you can model best. At this time, you will be experienced enough to deal with everything and your colleagues will start to order models for them. About author Angel Sosa A Radiologist who´s passionate about AI and imaging in any form. From x rays, ultrasound to CT, MR and 3d printing. Likes photography, music, and video games.
  11. In 2020 we were in lockdown but this did not mean an obstacle for 3d printing technology to continue evolving. As we saw, many of the researchers focused their ingenuity, creativity and work to contribute in the fight against the Covid-19 and prevent transmission. There was an important development in the area of surgery, dentistry, cardiovascular surgery and traumatology. Searching "3D printing" at Pubmed returned 3487 published articles. 1. Review on 3D printing: Fight against COVID-19 Oladapo, B. I., Ismail, S. O., Afolalu, T. D., Olawade, D. B., & Zahedi, M. (2020). Materials chemistry and physics, 258, 123943. 2. Fabrication of polylactic acid (PLA)-based porous scaffold through the combination of traditional bio-fabrication and 3D printing technology for bone regeneration Zhou, X., Zhou, G., Junka, R., Chang, N., Anwar, A., Wang, H., & Yu, X. (2020). Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 197, 111420. 3. Musculoskeletal Tissue Engineering Using Fibrous Biomaterials Tan, G., Zhou, Y., & Sooriyaarachchi, D. In Wound Regeneration (pp. 31-40). Humana, New York, NY. 4. 3D Printed Fistula Plug: A Novel Bridge to Definitive Reconstruction Macielak, R. J., Ziebarth, M. T., & Price, D. L. (2020). The Laryngoscope. 5. A Novel Three-Dimensional-Printed Ultrasound-Guided Hip Arthrocentesis Model Chiem, A. T., Lister, J. P., Singh, M., Alegria‐Leal, E., Morales, J., Salibian, R., ... & Stark, E. (2020).  Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, 40(1), 175-181. 6. An overview on 3D printing for abdominal surgery Pietrabissa, A., Marconi, S., Negrello, E., Mauri, V., Peri, A., Pugliese, L., ... & Auricchio, F. (2019). Surgical endoscopy, 1-13. 7. 3D Printing Applications for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Levin, D., Mackensen, G. B., Reisman, M., McCabe, J. M., Dvir, D., & Ripley, B. (2020). Current Cardiology Reports, 22(4), 1-9. 8. A 3D printing replication technique for fabricating digital dentures Takeda, Y., Lau, J., Nouh, H., & Hirayama, H. (2020). The Journal of prosthetic dentistry, 124(3), 251-256. 9. Quality Control in Medical 3D Printing Weadock, W. J. (2020). Quality Control in Medical 3D Printing. Academic Radiology, 27(5), 661-662. 10. An update on applications of 3D printing technologies used for processing polymers used in implant dentistry Revilla-León, M., Sadeghpour, M., & Özcan, M. (2019). . Odontology, 1-8. About author Angel Sosa A Radiologist who´s passionate about AI and imaging in any form. From x rays, ultrasound to CT, MR and 3d printing. Likes photography, music, and video games.
  12. Before we dive into the top Member of 2020, we would like to thank all Embodi3D members, you enrich the medical 3d library. In addition, we would like to encourage you to upload more files and be part of the largest, most reputable, and fastest growing library of affordable medical 3D printable models for use in medicine, veterinary practice, and anthropology. These 15 top members have shared the best 3D models for 2020 1. Meet Mike Itagaki |CEO and Founder at Embodi3D @Dr. Mike He is a practicing board-certified interventional radiologist, Dr. Mike Itagaki, MD, MBA, our founder, who specializes in cardiovascular imaging and minimally-invasive image-guided interventional procedures had performed countless procedures on hundreds of patients throughout his career. Though he always used every resource available to prepare for surgeries, every procedure contained unknowns. There was no way to practice, so he could only do his best to prepare for any possible outcome. He is also interested in the use of 3D printing in medical imaging and surgical planning. 2. Meet Embodi3D | Senior Guru @embodi3d The Official Embodi3D Account. 3. Meet Terrie Simmons-Ehrhardt | Advanced Member & Blogger @tsehrhardt She is a forensic anthropology. She started extracting bones from CTs during a fellowship after her M.A. Using bones from CTs provides an opportunity to view an enormous amount of skeletal variation so easily, and she is all about using 3D technology to improve methods for human identification and skeletal analyses, 3D printing teaching specimens, etc. She is also considering pursuing additional education and certification in Rad Tech, so she can be experienced in the front-end collection as well. She´s currently reading First Cut by Judy Melinek and T.J. Mitchell! 4. Meet Peter Valchanov | Elite Contributor @valchanov MD. Physician, anatomy teacher, scientist, 3D artist, medical 3d printing specialist. Creating and 3D printing human organ replicas for living, planning to print living ones soon. Proficient with sharp instruments, medical data and CAD software. Hoping to save the world one day. 5. Meet Vjekoslav Kopačin @kopachini He is a Radiology Resident, but not for long 😵 and interested in interventional radiology. When he isn´t studying or 3d printing, he is crazy about on-line video game called World of Tanks 😁😁. 6. Meet Gustavo Santoro | Power Contributor @Gustavo He is interested in Veterinary CT 3D printing and uploads the best veterinary 3D models 7. Meet Michael Fassbind | Senior Contributor @mikefazz He specialize in creating 3D models from CT and MRI scans (digital and 3D printed). His previous work was at a biomechanics research group focusing on lower limb biomechanics and prosthetics. 8. Meet Allen Blake Chao | Senior Contributor @Allen Support administrator and community manager for Embodi3D. He shares relevant news with our community. 9. Meet Jesús Báez | Senior Contributor @Jesús Báez He is a Radiologist Technician Graduated from CUCS (Mexico). Passionate about radiological and sectional anatomy. He likes open source and open hardware, powered by 3d printing and he found embodi3D a very motivating project. 10. Meet Pzuniga | Senior Contributor @pzuniga This member shares excellent skull and maxillofacial files. 11. Meet Jaime de la Parra | Contributor @delaparra He is interested in biomedical Imaging, 3D printing of Implants and models. 12. Meet Frank Bonelli | Contributor @fbonel He uploads a great variety of 3d models. 13. Meet Selami | Contributor @Selami Architecture Cad. Selami shares amazing 3d models. 14. Wrennie |Contributor @Wrennie Wrennie shares awesome skin 3d models 15. Meet Justin Kerby | Junior Contributor @kerbyradres He is currently a third year Radiology Resident at the University of Kansas Medical Center and 3D printing hobbyist. He makes anatomic models for procedure simulations. Special thanks to: Meet Jerry Stanley | Junior Contributor @Jerry Stanley Jerry's amazing contribution to fight Covid: Face shield Meet Bob Nordlund | Junior Contributor @attenb Bob shared with us the: Hepa Filter Holder for BVMs About author Angel Sosa A Radiologist who´s passionate about AI and imaging in any form. From x rays, ultrasound to CT, MR and 3d printing. Likes photography, music, and video games.
  13. As 2020 comes to an end, we reflect how the world changed, and it changed us. However, in the middle of this difficult times many found 3d printing a helpful tool to fight the pandemic. We'd like to share with you the most downloaded 3d medical printing models of 2020, most of them related to the pandemic. 1.N95 mask holder for UV sterilization box (2 mask holder) 1.0.0 This is a 3D printable holder for N95 masks. You can also watch the DIY UV sterilization video. 2. Anatomical heart box 1.0.0 Who said anatomically correct hearts could not be romantic? Our second 3D model of the list is an anatomical heart box that was originally molded as an engagement ring box and a really nice gift. 3. N95 mask holder for UV sterilization box (set of 6 two mask holders) 1.0.0 Is the 2 mask holder not enough? Here you can find a set of 6 mask holders and remember to take a look at the video. 4. N95 mask holder for UV sterilization box (1 mask holder) 1.0.0 Wait, is it 6 mask holders too much? There is a 3d printing model for every need. 5. Covid19 infected lung 1.0.0 In order to fight covid we need to understand it. 3d models could help us to know more how Covid affects our lungs. 6. Lungmax.stl 1.0.0 It is important to know the normal lung (respiratory) anatomy as well. And this 3d model is very useful. 7. 3dslicer segmentation partial head 1.0.0 This example shows a segmentation of partial head. We can observe the skull base foramina 8. Body 1.0.0 This example without contrast we can observe all the thoracic and abdominal structures 9. 9F bones liver kidney spleen artery and vein 1.0.0 This is a great model of the skeleton, liver, kidneys and main vessels. 10. Spine_2 1.0.0 Here we can observe a severe scoliosis as the spinal curve is above 40 degrees About author Angel Sosa A Radiologist who´s passionate about AI and imaging in any form. From x rays, ultrasound to CT, MR and 3d printing. Likes photography, music, and video games.
  14. Hi Joaosuh welcome to embodi3d, I´m sharing with you some articles about this topic, I hope it helps! Modelling of aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection through 3D printing: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/jmrs.212 3D printing of surgical hernia meshes impregnated with contrast agents: in vitro proof of concept with imaging characteristics on computed tomography: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s41205-018-0037-4 Influence of Contrast Agent Dilution on Ballon Deflation Time and Visibility During Tracheal Balloon Dilation: A 3D Printed Phantom Study https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27826787/ 3D Printing of Intracranial Aneurysms Using Fused Deposition Modeling Offers Highly Accurate Replications https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26294648/
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    kidney test - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. 🇺🇸 A 9-month-old male infant with medical history of grade III hydronephrosis from birth and a posterior urethral valve. An imaging control shows delay in the elimination of contrast medium in the right collecting system and left ureteropyelocalectasia. 🇪🇸 Paciente lactante masculino de 9 meses de edad quien cursa con hidronefrosis grado III desde el nacimiento y valva uretral posterior. Acude a control imagenólogico evidenciando retraso de la eliminación del medio de contraste en el sistema colector derecho y ureteropielocalectasia izquierda. .stl, 3d, model printable, printing, printable, dorsal, ribs, joint, body, intervertebral, disc, transverse, spinous, process, spine, nucleus, iliac, ureter, pelvis, calix, hydronephrosis, sacrum, foramina, foramen, lumbar, printing, medical, medicine, child, ilium, ischium, femoral, head, neck, hip,

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  16. Angel Sosa

    kidney test

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    🇺🇸 A 9-month-old male infant with medical history of grade III hydronephrosis from birth and a posterior urethral valve. An imaging control shows delay in the elimination of contrast medium in the right collecting system and left ureteropyelocalectasia. 🇪🇸 Paciente lactante masculino de 9 meses de edad quien cursa con hidronefrosis grado III desde el nacimiento y valva uretral posterior. Acude a control imagenólogico evidenciando retraso de la eliminación del medio de contraste en el sistema colector derecho y ureteropielocalectasia izquierda. Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. .stl, 3d, model printable, printing, printable, dorsal, ribs, joint, body, intervertebral, disc, transverse, spinous, process, spine, nucleus, iliac, ureter, pelvis, calix, hydronephrosis, sacrum, foramina, foramen, lumbar, printing, medical, medicine, child, ilium, ischium, femoral, head, neck, hip, ct, scan, with, contrast, axial,

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  17. Version 1.0.0

    31 downloads

    Skull fracture - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. head, skull, .stl, 3d, model, printable, printing, medical, medicine, orbit, nasal, maxilla, mandible, angle, ramus, bone, zygomatic, arch, angle, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital, incisor, molar, premolar, canine, teeth, tooth, dental, dentistry, mastoid, process, orbit, left, fracture,

    Free

  18. Version 1.0.0

    20 downloads

    Head - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. ct, scan, without, contrast, hematoma, left, .stl, 3d, model, printable, printing, medical, medicine, petrous, ridge, parietal, occipital, frontal, orbit, nasal, septum, hard, palate, incisor, molar, premolar, canine, teeth, tooth, dental, dentistry, muscle, hyoid, bone, cervical, spine, atlas, axis, intervertenral, disc, clinoid, apophyis, clivus, fracture, bleed, vermis, hemisphere, subarachnoid,

    Free

  19. Hello, you need to export the file to a volume file such as a .mvl or a.vol file. When not possible export as DICOM with the 3D dataset. Check this video you´ll learn how to get this types of files using 3dSlicer
  20. Hello Eric, you can use 3D Slicer https://download.slicer.org/
  21. Hello!, maybe this model printed by @valchanov could help you, regards
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