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Angel Sosa

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Angel Sosa last won the day on January 22

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About Angel Sosa

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  1. Hello Hector, welcome to Embodi3d. Meanwhile you can check this website: https://wiki.cancerimagingarchive.net/display/NBIA/Downloading+Images+Using+the+NBIA+Data+Retriever You can download the app to download the volumes of the tomographs and then enter them in the tool of our website to create the 3d models. Downloading Images Using the NBIA Data Retriever When you download images you have added to your cart, TCIA provides a list of these images in a manifest file (manifest-xxx.tcia). You must have already installed the NBIA Data Retriever to open this manifest file and download the images. You can share the manifest file with collaborators, so that they can download the same images that you have added to your cart. Collaborators must also install the NBIA Data Retriever to open the manifest file. If you want to share a manifest file that includes links to private image collections, you must first manually install the latest NBIA Data Retriever. The latest version of the NBIA Data Retriever controls access to private collections. In addition, your collaborators must have the same access to those private collections as you do. Otherwise, your collaborators will not be able to download images from those collections. I hope this helps to get started. Angel S.
  2. Hello, welcome to embodi3d, I think valchanov could help you with this task. Regards, Angel S.
  3. In 2019, 1482 articles about 3D printing were published, there have been important advances in all areas of medicine, mainly in surgery where implants and tissue reconstruction are used. For an optimal search we recommend using https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/. We share with you the articles that are among the 10 most read today. These collections reflect the most important 3d printing research topics of current scientific interest and are designed for experienced investigators and educators alike. 1. The Role of 3D Printing in Medical Applications: A State of the Art. Aimar A, et al. J Healthc Eng 2019 - Review. PMID 31019667 Free PMC article. 2. Medical 3D Printing. Is This Just The Beginning? El Gamel A. Heart Lung Circ 2019. PMID 31495503 3. 3D Printing of Pharmaceutical and Medical Applications: a New Era. Douroumis D. Pharm Res 2019. PMID 30684014 4. Perspectives of 3D printing technology in orthopaedic surgery. Zamborsky R, et al. Bratisl Lek Listy 2019. PMID 31602984 5. [Research Progress of 3D Printing Technology in Medical Field]. Zou Q, et al. Zhongguo Yi Liao Qi Xie Za Zhi 2019 - Review. PMID 31460721 Chinese. 6. Implementations of 3D printing in ophthalmology. Sommer AC and Blumenthal EZ. Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol 2019 - Review. PMID 30993457 7. 3D printing for heart valve disease: a systematic review. Tuncay V and van Ooijen PMA. Eur Radiol Exp 2019 - Review. PMID 30771098 Free PMC article. 8. 3D printing and amputation: a scoping review. Ribeiro D, et al. Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol 2019. PMID 31418306 9. Medical 3D Printing Cost-Savings in Orthopedic and Maxillofacial Surgery: Cost Analysis of Operating Room Time Saved with 3D Printed Anatomic Models and Surgical Guides. Ballard DH, et al. Acad Radiol 2019. PMID 31542197 10. 3D and 4D Printing of Polymers for Tissue Engineering Applications. Tamay DG, et al. Front Bioeng Biotechnol 2019 - Review. PMID 31338366 Free PMC article.
  4. This has been an amazing year for us at Embodi3d and we'd like to share with you the best 3d medical printing models of 2019 1. A great brain 3d model, the first place! uploaded by Osamanyuad. This example shows the cortex which is a thin layer of the brain that covers the outer portion (1.5mm to 5mm) of the cerebrum. 2. A heart 3D printed model uploaded by Tropmal. It shows the coronary arteries that supply oxygenated blood to the heart muscle, excellent for educational purposes. 3. Portal vessels anatomy uploaded by Platypus1221. The portal vein or hepatic portal vein is a blood vessel that carries blood from the gastrointestinal tract, gallbladder, pancreas and spleen to the liver. 4. A Dental Cone-beam Computed Tomography in an adult orthodontic patient uploaded by R Thomas. The cbct is an advanced imaging modality that has high clinical applications in the field of dentistry. 5. A kidney 3D .STL file uploaded by Shahriar The kidneys are a pair of organs found along the posterior muscular wall of the abdominal cavity. The left kidney is located slightly more superior than the right kidney due to the larger size of the liver on the right side of the body. This is an excellent example in .stl format. 6. 3D Printable Human Heart Model with stackable slices, short axis view uploaded by Dr. Mike. This 3D printable model of a normal human heart was generated from an ECG-gated contrast enhanced coronary CT scan. The slices are cut to illustrate the echocardiographic short-axis view. If you are interested in a 3D printable heart that shows slices in the anatomical transverse plane, 7. A bony hand in a .STL file processed uploaded by MABC The wrist has eight small bones called the carpal bones, or the carpus. These join the hand to the two long bones in the forearm (radius and ulna). The carpal bones are small square, oval, and triangular bones. The cluster of carpal bones in the wrist make it both strong and flexible. This incredible 3D medical printing model shows all the bones and joints for learning purposes! 8. 3D Prenatal Ultrasound uploaded by kevinvandeusen The 3D ultrasound images provide greater detail for prenatal diagnosis than the older 2D ultrasound technology. 9. A bony knee in a .STL file processed uploaded by Yousef97 In this example we can evaluate the knee joint in three parts: The thigh bone (the femur) meets the large shin bone (the tibia) to form the main knee joint. This joint has an inner (medial) and an outer (lateral) compartment. The kneecap (the patella) joins the femur to form a third joint, called the patellofemoral joint. 10. A lower extremity CT scan of a femoral fracture uploaded by Yondonjunai The femur is the largest bone in the body, and consequently it is often thought that high energy mechanisms are required to produce a femur fracture. You can see an example here: 11. An skull fracture example uploaded by Raspirate This example shows a fracture skull. The skull is a bony structure that supports the face and forms a protective cavity for the brain. 12. A CT chest scan with contrast upload by Nikluz This example shows the vascular structures and thorax muscles. 13. 3D-Print a Left Knee Joint Model with this Excellent STL Upload (Converted from CT Scan) by Niels96 A 3D model of left knee, we can see that is formed by three bones: the femur, the tibia and the patella. the knee joint is the largest synovial joint and provides the flexion and extension movements of the leg as well as relative medial and lateral rotations while in relative flexion. 14. A Huge thoraco-abdominal aneurysm (preoperative model) by Valchanov This is a difusse dilatation of aorta with a high risk for rupture. Most of the patients are asymptomatics and accidentally discovered on routine chest radiography. 15. A stl file showing the elbow´s bones by Pekka The elbow is a hinged joint made up of three bones, the humerus, ulna, and radius. The ends of the bones are covered with cartilage. 16. A CT scan of Left Knee Joint Model by Niels96 Computed tomography scan (CT or CAT scan) is a non-invasive diagnostic imaging procedure that uses a combination of special X-ray equipment and sophisticated computer technology to produce cross-sectional images (often called slices), both horizontally and vertically, of the body. In this example we can evaluate the knee with detail. 17. A 3d model of a polytrauma pelvis in a .STL file by Narkos. This patient suffer a polytrauma right hemipelvis with fracture S1-S2 and fracture of the ischiopubial branch. 18. A full body CT scan by davidmorris80@oulook.com A whole body scanner images without injection with window function that allows the study of the soft tissues, including lymph node structures, mediastinum and abdomen. 19. A .STL file of a left temporal bone ready for 3d printing by Nicola Di Giuseppe. This shows the mastoid, malleus, incus, the bony canal of the facial nerve and the stylomastoid foramen excellent for learning purposes. 20. An Anatomical heart box 3d model by valchanov This was valchanov´s best selling model for 2019!
  5. Great work! valchanov
  6. Maybe you can learn more about it here: https://3dprintedultrasounds.com/blog/2018/09/10/convert-an-ultrasound-image-to-an-stl/
  7. Hello, check this tutorial out https://www.embodi3d.com/blogs/entry/345-a-ridiculously-easy-way-to-convert-ct-scans-to-3d-printable-bone-stl-models-for-free-in-minutes/
  8. Top Orbital and Skull 3D Model STL Files on embodi3D® In our day-to-day lives, we rely on vision more than any of the other four senses, so it only makes sense that human anatomy has adapted to include several features which keep our eyes safe: tear ducts, eyelids, and of course the orbital bone. The orbit (also known as the "eye socket") provides a rigid form of support and protection for some of the most sensitive parts of the eye including the central retinal artery, maeula, retina, choroid, and sclera. The orbit has such complex anatomical features that modeling can prove difficult, and in many instances, the finer features of the orbital bone have been simply been averaged out. The orbital structure isn't one bone, but seven: the frontal, lacrimal, ethmoid, zygomatic, maxillary, and palatine, and sphenoid bones. Can you think of any part of the human body where seven bones converge to fulfill a singular purpose? In recognition of this phenomenal feature of the human anatomy (and one of the most recognizable parts of the human skull), this week's embodi3D® Top Uploads articles, we are featuring several standout uploads — all of which can be used to create an orbital and skull 3D model. As detailed in the scholarly article "Clinical application of three-dimensional printing technology in craniofacial plastic surgery" 3D printing techniques are being used in craniofacial surgeries and especially in reconstruction procedures the require complex modeling. Using the latest 3D printing technology and the STL files converted using democratiz3D®, the contralateral orbit can serve as a point of reference for those in the medical field since the ipsilateral structures taken with a CT scan can be easily converted into an STL file and then fed to a 3D printer. These technologies improve patient consultations, increase the quality of diagnostic information while also helping to improve the planning stage of the surgical process. During surgery, a 3D-printed model of the orbital can be used to orient surgical staff and serve as a guide for surgical resectioning procedures. While these files are available for free on the website, you must register with embodi3D® before you can begin uploading and converting your own CT scans into STL files as well as downloading and 3D printing anatomical models from other users. Every day the collection of anatomical models grows on the embodi3D® website. This is but one of the many ways embodi3D® is seeking to revolutionize medical practices. #1. An Awesome Model of the Orbit's Acute Anatomy The orbits are conical structures dividing the upper facial skeleton from the middle face and surround the organs of vision. Seven bones conjoin to form the orbital structure as we can see in the example below. #2. A 3D Model of the Orbit's Surface in STL Format This excellent 3D model of embodi3D® shows the superficial bony margin of the orbit, which is rectangular with rounded corners. The margin is discontinuous at the lacrimal fossa. The supraorbital notch (seen in the image below) is within the supraorbital rim and is closed to form the supraorbital foramen in 25% of individuals. The supratrochlear notch is medial to the supraorbital notch. #3. A CT Scan of an Orbital Floor Fracture Hisham published this excellent ct scan on embodi3D®. Direct fractures of the orbital floor can extend from fractures of the inferior orbital rim. Indications for repair of the orbital floor in these cases are the same as those for indirect (blowout) fractures. Indirect fractures of the orbital floor are not associated with fracture of the inferior orbital rim. #4. A 3D Model of an Orbital Fracture CT scans with coronal or sagittal views and 3D models help guide treatment. They allow evaluation of fracture size and extraocular muscle relationships, providing information that can be used to help predict enophthalmos and muscle entrapment. #5. 3D Model Showing an Orbital Fracture Dropbear upload this excellent example of a right orbit fracture. #6. An Orbit 3D Model (Printable) Showing Fibrous Dysplasia (FD) for Surgical Demonstration The FD is a benign slowly progressive disorder of bone, where normal cancellous bone is replaced by fibrous tissue and immature woven bone. This entity constitutes about 2.5 % of all bone tumors. #7. An Orbit tumor 57-year-old male patient with increase in left orbital volume and proptosis for 6 months related to headache. No relevant personal medical history. #8. Complex right facial bone fractures In this example we can evaluate a rotated tripod, orbital roof and floor, maxillary sinus, nasoorbitalethmoidal. References Choi, J. W., & Kim, N. (2015). Clinical application of three-dimensional printing technology in craniofacial plastic surgery. Archives of plastic surgery, 42(3), 267. Bibby, K., & McFadzean, R. (1994). Fibrous dysplasia of the orbit. British journal of ophthalmology, 78(4), 266-270.
  9. If you are able to read this sentence, you not only have your English teacher to thank (as the popular bumper sticker suggests), but also your brain. The human brain — all of 3 pounds (1,350 grams) — consumes over 10% of the human body's total energy, yet most of its weight is water and makes up very little of the body's total mass. The recent explosion of 3D printing technologies in the field of neurosurgery has made creating a 3D brain model using CT-converted STL files easier than ever. This popularity has led to a number of medical authorities to further explore the technology's current utility and future potential. In a recent article titled "3D printing in neurosurgery: A systematic review," it was found that 3D printing techniques are not only practical, but also a viable means of creating anatomically correct models that can be applied to medical simulations, training, surgical planning, and secondary devices. 3D-printed models have also enabled neurosurgeons to explore structures in a way that is non-invasive. Amazingly, 3D models can be created using existing technologies, such as two-dimensional MRI, CT, and X-ray scans. These files are then converted into 3D printer-ready STL files using a program such as democratiz3D® from embodi3D®, a free tool that makes converting CT scans in 3D-printable files as easy as possible. Before you can make use the awesome medical 3D printing services offered by embodi3D®, you must become a registered embodi3D® member. It's absolutely free to join — sign up today! Once you've signed up, be sure to check out the tutorial demonstrating how easy it is to create your own 3D models. #1. 3D Printing a Brain Model with Stroke from an STL File This excellent 3D model of the brain circulation shows all the intracranial vessels. Stroke is a generic term that describes the clinical event of a sudden onset of neurologic deficit secondary to cerebrovascular disease. Stroke has 4 main etiologies, including cerebral infarction (80%), intraparenchymal hemorrhage (15%), nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (5%), and venous infarction (approximately 1%). Clinically, ischemic infarction is the most common etiology and will be the main topic of this introduction. The principal cause of cerebral infarction is atherosclerosis and its sequelae. Middle Cerebral Artery (MCA) distribution typically involves the majority of the lateral surface of the hemisphere, including the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. In addition, the majority of the lenticulostriate arteries arise from the M1 segment and supplies the basal ganglia. Anterior Cerebral Artery (ACA) supplies the medial anteroinferior frontal lobe, the anterior 2/3 of the medial hemisphere surface, and a variable amount of territory over the cerebral convexity. The corpus callosum is also typically supplied primarily by the ACA branches: Callosal perforating, pericallosal, and posterior splenial branches. Posterior Cerebral Artery (PCA) vascular territory, including the occipital lobes, inferior temporal lobes, and medial posterior 1/3 of the interhemispheric brain. Patients with PCA ischemia most commonly present with visual complaints. Large vessel/atherosclerotic strokes represent ~ 40% of strokes. The carotid bifurcation is the most common site of atherosclerotic plaque. Circle of Willis - A1-segment: Anterior cerebral artery from carotid bifurcation to anterior communicating artery gives rise to the medial lenticulostriate arteries. - A2-segment: Part of anterior cerebral artery distal to the anterior communicating artery. - P1-segment: Part of the posterior cerebral artery proximal to the posterior communicating artery. The posterior communicating artery is between the carotid bifurcation and the posterior cerebral artery) - P2-segment: Part of the posterior cerebral artery distal to the posterior communicating artery. - M1-segment: Horizontal part of the middle cerebral artery which gives rise to the lateral lenticulostriate arteries which supply most of the basal ganglia. - M2-segment: is the part in the sylvian fissure and the M3-segment is the cortical segment. - Horizontal M1-segment Gives rise to the lateral lenticulostriate arteries which supply part of head and body of caudate, globus pallidus, putamen and the posterior limb of the internal capsule. Notice that the medial lenticulostriate arteries arise from the A1-segment of the anterior cerebral artery. - Sylvian M2-segment Branches supply the temporal lobe and insular cortex (sensory language area of Wernicke), parietal lobe (sensory cortical areas) and inferolateral frontal lobe - Cortical M3-segment Branches supply the lateral cerebral cortex #2. A Brain Model Created from a High-Resolution MRI Scan This 3D model shows each of the cerebral hemispheres (the frontal lobe, the parietal lobe, the temporal lobe, and the occipital lobe, limbic lobe), sulcus, Silvian fissure and Rolandic fissure. Surgical education has undergone a recent paradigm shift toward simulation-based training as opposed to the traditional experience-based training program. This change reflects the need for a safe teaching environment separated from the risk-inherent operating room, thus enabling teaching faculty to focus on training during simulations and patient care during operations. Other factors have also contributed to the shift including instituted training restrictions that have limited patient interactions, which are essential for procedural learning. The capabilities of 3D printing are well suited for the development of these physical simulators, which is evident from the literature. #3. An MRI of the Brain This excellent MRI image of the brain shows all the anatomy structures with great detail. Current surgical planning for the resection of brain tumors involves using MRI technology to differentiate between tumor and surrounding brain tissue. Nonetheless, even when this distinction is clear, it can be difficult for surgeons to appreciate the relationships between adjacent anatomical landmarks during the procedure. 3D printing technology has enabled MRI data to be translated into patient-specific models depicting the associations between tumor, skull, vasculature, and surrounding nonpathologic brain tissue. Therefore, surgeons can recognize the location and extent of the tumor relative gyral/sulcal patterns and skull features. Models have then been further utilized to simulate realistic surgical approaches under microscopic observation. Spottiswoode et al. additionally included printed regions of functional MRI (fMRI) activation determined from presurgical mapping paradigms in the model to demarcate areas of eloquent cortex that should be avoided in resection. #4. A Brain CTA (nrrd file) This is an illustrative case of a normal CT angiography obtained with contrast administration. #5. A Fronto-Parietal Brain Tumor from an MRI Printed head models have also had a role in the planning and development of novel treatments for brain tumors. Phantoms that replicate the properties of the skull and cerebral tissue were produced to evaluate the potential for MRI-guided focused ultrasound to be used in the noninvasive thermocoagulation of brain tumors. #6. A 55-Year-Old Male's Brain (from an MRI Scan) The neocortex is the most phylogenetically developed structure of the human brain as compared with the brains of other species. The complex pattern of folding allows an increased cortical surface to occupy a smaller cranial volume. The pattern of folding that forms the sulcal and gyral patterns remains highly preserved across individuals. This enables a nomenclature for the cortical anatomy. #7. A Post-Traumatic Brain Injury Pneumocephalus refers to the presence of intracranial gas, and in the vast majority of cases the gas is air. The term encompasses gas in any of the intracranial compartments, and is most commonly encountered following trauma or surgery. Gas on CT will have a very low density (~ -1000HU) but care needs to be taken in ensuring that it is not fat which although of much higher density (-90HU) also appear completely black on routine brain windows. #8. A 3d printable model of the brain: An example This brain model was printed for a customer in white PLA. It turned out great! #9. Dilated Ventricles with Colpocephaly Colpocephaly is a congenital brain abnormality in which the occipital horns - the posterior or rear portion of the lateral ventricles (cavities) of the brain -- are larger than normal because white matter in the posterior cerebrum has failed to develop or thicken. #10. Full Sized Brain with marked cerebellar atrophy Diffuse atrophy of the cerebellum refers to a progressive and irreversible reduction in cerebellar volume. It is a relatively common finding and found in a wide variety of clinical scenarios. References 1. Randazzo, M., Pisapia, J. M., Singh, N., & Thawani, J. P. (2016). 3D printing in neurosurgery: a systematic review. Surgical neurology international, 7(Suppl 33), S801. 2. Radiology assistant web. 3 Radiopaedia.org 4. Osborn´s Brain Imaging. 5. Medscape
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