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Dr. Mike

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Everything posted by Dr. Mike

  1. There seems to be lots of interest in this community regarding 3D printing from ultrasound images. Does anybody know of resources available to show how to do it? I'm sure many here would be interested.
  2. Dr. Mike

    Mimics

    Does anybody have experience with the Mimics software suite from Materialise? How user friendly is it? How much does it cost?
  3. You are very welcome. We really try to listen to all member feedback, and appreciate it when people take the time to let us know about a problem. Thank you.
  4. Agreed. This limit was put in place to prevent abuse for free downloads, but should not apply to paid items. We are working on a fix. You should now be able to download your files. Thank you for letting us know about this issue.
  5. Dr. Mike

    Postprocessing 3D prints

    You can use a variety of free tools, including Blender or Meshmixer. Meshmixer is probably easiest. Here is the function shown in this picture.
  6. A member recently messaged me with a question about a brain she printed from this file. I as posting the response here in the hope that it will help others in the community. QUESTION "I came across your 3D printable human brain model and was able to successfully print it. Thank you for sharing it! Now I need to post-process it and am wondering if you can explain how you post-processed your print? I have never done the post-processing before and am not sure the best approach to take. I have attached a picture of our printed brain for your reference. Thank you in advance for insight you can offer!" RESPONSE: Based on the picture you attached, it looks like you used a single extruder printer and printed both the supports and model in the same material, presumably PLA. You need to tear off the supports using pliers. This can be a time-consuming job as getting in every nook and cranny can be difficult. If you find the supports are stuck to much to the model, you may have to adjust some of the settings in your slicer software to compensate. There may be a rough surface where the supports touch the model that you can sand off. If you have a dual extrusion printer, you can print the supports using a water soluble material such as PVA, which makes the supports easy to remove by soaking in water. Dual extruders can be finicky and you will likely have to spend a lot of time trying out different settings to get the supports to work just right, including calibrating the XY offset of the second extruder, determining optimal print temperature for the PLA and support to work together, overhang speed, support infill percentage, etc. This process is very time consuming but gratifying once you get your printer dialed in. If you don't want to deal with the headache, embodi3D has a 3D printing service and can print and ship to you. Hope this helps. Dr. Mike
  7. Version 1.0.0

    596 downloads

    This Brain model was created from a high resolution MRI scan. The model includes the cerebrum. The cerebellum and brain stem are not depicted. The model has been made hollow, with 4 mm wall thickness to save on material when 3D printing. The model is full-size. It has been successfully printed at full size on an Ultimaker 3 Extended printer, and at 95% size on a Formlabs Form 2 printer. Technical parameters: Vertices: 350725 Triangles: 701950 Size: 17.9 x 13.4 x 11.5 cm

    Free

  8. Version 1.0.0

    368 downloads

    This 3D printable model of a human heart was generated from a contrast enhanced CT scan. This model is an improvement over a prior version (here). It shows the heart with slices cut in the anatomical transverse plane. If you are interested in a heart with short-axis slices, check out my short-axis stackable slice model here. Notches have been added to ensure the slices fit together and do not slide against each other. The model demonstrates the detailed anatomy of the human heart in exquisite detail. Each slice stacks on top of the prior slice to form a complete human heart. Individual slices show the detailed cardiac anatomy of the right and left ventricles, and right and left atria, and outflow tracts. Perfect for educational purposes. It has been validated as printable on an Ultimaker 3 Extended printer. Technical parameters: manifold STL (watertight) vertices: 462576 triangles: 925800 dimensions: 15.1 x 15.2 x 10.5 cm

    $4.99

  9. Dr. Mike

    Skull is seen as two shells

    Kopachini is correct. You need to close the open hole.
  10. Version

    929 downloads

    This full-size skull with web-like texture was created from a real CT scan. The beautiful lace-like structure not only makes the piece aesthetically interesting and strong, but also reduces material cost when 3D printing. The file is in STL format. This is the full-size version. A half-size version is also available here. Please share your 3D printable creations in the File Vault as I have shared mine with you. Feel free to print this model for your own personal use but please do not use this file for commercial purposes.

    Free

  11. Version

    821 downloads

    This half-size skull with web-like texture was created from a real CT scan. The beautiful lace-like structure not only makes the piece aesthetically interesting and strong, but also reduces material cost when 3D printing. The file is in STL format. This is the half-size version. A full-size version is also available here. Please share your 3D printable creations in the File Vault as I have shared mine with you. Feel free to print this model for your own personal use but please do not use this file for commercial purposes.

    Free

  12. Version 1.0.0

    16 downloads

    This 3D printable model of a normal human heart was generated from an ECG-gated contrast enhanced coronary CT scan. The slices are cut to illustrate the echocardiographic short-axis view. If you are interested in a 3D printable heart that shows slices in the anatomical transverse plane, click here. Notches have been added to ensure the slices fit together and do not slide against each other. The model demonstrates the detailed anatomy of the human heart in exquisite detail. Each slice stacks on top of the prior slice to form a complete human heart. There is a sturdy and stable base. Individual slices show the detailed cardiac anatomy of the right and left ventricles, and right and left atria, and outflow tracts in echocardiographic short-axis projection. Perfect for educational purposes. Technical parameters: Individual STLs: 4 Mesh integrity: manifold STL (watertight) vertices: appx 550k per object triangles: appx 1.1M per object dimensions: 11.4 x 9.1 x 10.6 cm

    $4.99

  13. We recently 3D printed a multimaterial skull with MCA aneurysm from a CTA head for customer who needed the skull in rigid plastic and the vessels and aneurysm in flexible material. The model will be used by neurosurgeons to practice intracranial aneurysm clipping surgery. To properly simulate the surgery, the skull needs to be hard and the vessels elastic. Combining two materials (and two printers!) provides the best solution. The model was created on democratiz3D. You can learn more about embodi3D's printing service here.
  14. Dr. Mike

    Lumbar Spine 3D print

    You might want to check the spine and pelvis download area. https://www.embodi3d.com/files/category/13-spine-and-pelvis/
  15. Version

    459 downloads

    This half-size half-skull model shows detailed skull anatomy, including the cervical spine, skull base foramina, paranasal sinuses, and orbit. Perfect for teaching and as a discussion piece. Available for download in full and half size, STL and COLLADA formats. Please download and modify! Share your new creation by uploading to Embodi3D!

    Free

  16. Thanks for sharing the link Josip. Nice work!
  17. I receive a lot of inquiries to my account. I'm going to try to share them with the community in the hope that any information that is shared can help many others. A member recently contacted me and asked the following: "I am a Biomaterials and Tissue Engineer by profession and recently got into 3d printing of medical implants. I would be greatly obliged if you could please advice me on designing 'cranial mesh' My task is to design titanium based cranial mesh. I would like to know if you can suggest me any tutorial on the same." Another member asks, " I am a resident in neurosurgery in Brazil and I have a dream to allow cheap cranioplasty for those in need that depend on Brazilian public health system. If you have some sort of tutorial using free software to make those prosthetic cranial grafts of a cheap way to make a mold out of it I will be glad to hear from you. I am planning on buying the ultimaker 2 printer which allows direct PEEK print and also PLA print for mold to go through autoclave." I must admit that I have limited experience with craniofacial implants. I know that the physicians at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Bethesda Maryland are doing pioneering work in the field. Regarding making titanium-based implants I am unaware of any tutorials, but a search on Pubmed has yielded a few helpful articles. Here is one https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4073471/ From what I have seen most of these implants are designed using the Mimics system by Materialise. Regarding the low-cost solution for cranial implants, I'm not familiar with any freeware software that specifically does implants. From the hardware perspective, you may want to consider a Form 2 stereolithographic printer in addition to the Ultimaker 2 (FYI, there is a new Ultimaker 3 printer out). Formlabs, the makers of the Form 2 have a tutorial on using their printer to make molds for casting. https://formlabs.com/blog/3d-printing-for-injection-molding/ Formlabs has a dental biocompatible resin that I know some hospitals (Mayo Clinic) are using for in-surgery cutting guides. I heard them talk about that at a conference I recently attended. Whatever you do, make sure you follow the health safety rules in your country and take all necessary steps for patient safety.
  18. There is a Medical 3D printing conference in Germany this May. Materialise has a conference in Belgium this June. There is a smaller conference run in Basel Switzerland. Here is the link from last year (none available this year yet) I am still looking for North American conferences. Will post if I find any.
  19. Version

    3,539 downloads

    UPDATE: There is an improved tutorial that shows you how to create 3D printable bone models even more easily and for free on any operating system. Click here to learn more. This file pack contains files to accompany the tutorial "Creating 3D Printable Models from Medical Scans in 30 Minutes Using Free Software: Osirix, Blender, and Meshmixer." Download the files to follow along with the tutorial and create a 3D printed model yourself! If you haven't registered, please do so. Registration is free and only takes a minute. Included files: TCGA-06-5410 sharp.zip - contains the DICOM files with an anonymized research CT scan used to create the skull model skull file.zip - Contains the uncorrected, raw STL file generated from Osirix. skull file corrected.zip - Contains the skull STL file after correcting mesh errors in Blender. skull file corrected preform.zip - Contains the .form file of the corrected STL. This is the file format used with the Formlabs Form1+ printer. If you have this type of printer, download this file and print yourself. All files are compressed with zip.

    Free

  20. No, unfortunately it was cancelled for this year. I think the 3D printing conferences and workshops are going to organized by the RSNA 3D Printing Special Interest Group going forward, but I am not sure if they have determined an exact time and place yet. I highly encourage you to attend these conferences. They are highly informative and all the major groups doing medical 3D printing work (Mayo, Ottawa, Walter Reed, Stanford, VA, etc) will be attending and probably so will I! I will inquire with the RSNA 3D Printing SIG about the schedule of upcoming meetings and post a response here. Dr. Mike
  21. Dr. Mike

    image extraction

    You need volumetric (3D) data, not 2D angiographic data. Unless you have a CT or MRI, angios wont work. You could potentially do a cone-beam CTA in the angio suite if you have the right software though. kopachini, thanks for helping out this member with your response. Dr. Mike
  22. I have extensively used the Form 2 as well as the Ultimaker 3E and other FDM printers. My review of the UM3E is below. In short, neither works well for the complex geometries in medical and anatomic models. The build volume for the Form 2 is a major issue unless you are only doing small parts like dental. Also, cleanup is a pain with support removal, resin cleaning and post curing. You will also run into problems like being able to remove the part from the build platform. Because the part is attached so tightly, often a spatula doesn't work nor does the Formlabs part removal tool. I cut an artery in my finger once and sprayed blood all over the wall because a razor blade is often the only tool that can separate the part from the platform. You will need to wear gloves for everything, and I know of at least two people who have developed skin allergies to the resin. The UM3E advertises a large build volume for anatomic parts, but in my extensive testing I ran into about an 80% failure rate. You can see my full review of the Ultimaker 3E at the link below. I encountered all kinds of failures, especially with large parts, and I don't think the larger and more expensive S5 really addresses any of these issues except maybe having a filament detector. Really the only way I have found to reliable print anatomic part is to build highly customized printers and software. It took about a year of intense trial and error to get everything right. I took a really deep dive, including reprogramming firmware in Chinese (which I don't speak). If you are willing to go this route, I encourage and applaud you. FYI, if you have medical or anatomic prints and want to save yourself the headache, embodi3D has recently launched a medical 3D printing service that will print and ship to you. It is an alternative to consider. With regard to cost I think FDM is clearly less expensive. Formlabs was revolutionary when their first printer came out, but the FDM space has much more innovation with open architecture. It kind of reminds me of Apple vs PCs in the 1980s - well engineered but closed architecture vs cheaper open architecture. Hope this helps and thanks for being an embodi3D member! Dr. Mike
  23. A member had a question about how to postprocess this print. I posted my response in the forums.
  24. Version

    1,004 downloads

    -> IMPROVED VERSION OF THIS FILE IS AVAILABLE HERE <-- This 3D printable model of a human heart was generated from a contrast enhanced CT scan. The model comes in 4 slices, and demonstrates the detailed anatomy of the human heart in exquisite detail. Each slice stacks on top of the prior slice to form a complete human heart. Individual slices show the detailed cardiac anatomy of the right and left ventricles, and right and left atria, and outflow tracts. Perfect for educational purposes. Download this model for free and 3D print the model yourself! If you find this and other free medical models available for download on Embodi3d.com useful, please give back to the community by uploading and sharing a medical model of your design.

    $4.99

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