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Showing most liked content since 06/23/2017 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Andras Lasso

    Lumen of vessel in 3D Slicer

    For anybody who stumbles upon this thread: we've added "Hollow" effect to 3D Slicer's new Segment Editor module. It has the option of creating vessel wall inside, outside, or around the surface. The method uses labelmap representation for internal computation therefore it is very robust (there are no degenerate triangles or intersecting surfaces in the generated mesh), you may just need to set the resolution of the segmentation if you want to create models of very thin walls.. Here is a short demo video about how to use it: We constantly improve 3D Slicer's segmentation capabilities and 3D printing is one of the driving applications, so any feedback or feature requests are welcome.
  2. 3 points
    Diogo

    Teeth Micro CT

    Sorry guys been so busy and only now could come back and read your responses. I ended up with Mevislab for segmentation and analysis. Here is an example of what I have been doing. Cheers. Diogo Guerreiro S18T7 Final.mp4
  3. 2 points
    kopachini

    Vessel reconstructions

    Dear Jee Lee, if CTs are done in arterial phase you will hardly be able to show venous system by automatic segmentation, maybe if a really late phase more porto-venous phase is done you will have some more success. I would suggest that if you have arterial phase only, try automatic segmentation for arteries and try manual segmentation for veins. Or obtain porto-venous phase CT study.
  4. 2 points
    Hello Kopachini, I have some news for you. While the new GE machines have the facility to export images form DICOM files in STL format (either as a stand alone model or a relief model), they have unbundled the functionality so that the same functionality can be available using their stand alone software called 4D View where older GE models do not have this functionality built in. This allows you to access a DICOM file and export the image as a STL file. In theory you can download this software for the GE website, but it is rarely successful. And you need to be a member of the Voulson club. The only way I have found is to make friends with an owner of a GE system and ask them to request a demo version of the software. This is what I did. My (small) company 3D Industries is now working on this aspect as one of areas of activity with a view to commercialization. Let me know what you are doing and we may have a common interest. Best regards Peter
  5. 2 points
    Dr. Mike

    Formlabs Fuse 1 SLS printer

    Formlabs now has a low cost nylon SLS printer, the Fuse 1. It is about 10 times cheaper than other selective laser sintering printers. Check it out.
  6. 2 points
    Thank you very much for the files, I printed the 4 slices in a total of 64 hours in PETG red. It does take some time, but the result is fantastic. I printed it for my teacher of BIO A&P, she is a crazy about anything related to cardiovascular. I added small 5 x 1 mm earth magnets to hold the slices together. They seem to be te right thickness to compensate for the gap between each slices. Over all, I love that model. I will have to reprint the top slice as my part started to unglue from the bet and has some warp. What you do is awesome and giving it access for free is marvelous. Again thank you for your work Eric I will be starting on the heart attached to the spine very soon
  7. 2 points
  8. 2 points

    Version 1.0.0

    79 downloads

    This is an anonymized CT scan DICOM dataset to be used for teaching on how to create a 3D printable models.

    Free

  9. 2 points
    Dear Dr. Mike: I'm really excited to see the profile of Embodi3D. I commented a few days ago, I got my hands on this tutorial: http://www.makermex.blogspot.com.ar/#!http://makermex.blogspot.com/2015/03/como-convertir-una-tomografia-en.html I honestly was not sure Blender off a possible tool for the development of workflow. But to see what you have accomplished on the page, I put very, very happy. I'm using Blender for about 8 years (www.infografiaeinteriorismo.blogspot.com) a while ago and I'm trying to get 3D printed pieces from information obtained from a CT scanner does. My idea of ​​workflow is: DICOM files tomograph. SLICE 3D processing. Exported in STL format. Import Blender. Clean. 3D printing. I hope and I do urge you to help me if in the way of stumble learning obstacles. Of course, I greatly appreciate your time spent as fantastic video tutorials (I'm looking at right now). Greetings Carlos
  10. 1 point
    Andras Lasso

    Heart Segmentation

    You might find useful this video tutorial about how to segment whole heart using 3D Slicer's Segment editor: You can enable close captioning, as the audio is quite difficult to hear.
  11. 1 point
    I contacted one private clinic in my city which has 3D US, and they are apparently really good at it. They told me that they are too busy right now so I couldn't obtain new DICOM data, but I will call them again and ask them if I could come. But the doctor who works there told me that they have GE Voluson S10 (newest model) which have build in the possibility to save study as .stl file... same as Philips IntelliSpace portal that was told before. I did a little bit of research and really there it is, but not for S10, yet for E10 model: http://www3.gehealthcare.com/en/products/categories/ultrasound/voluson/voluson_e10#tabs/tab44799EF6884146E1A27A6929FCAB17D5 Keep your fingers crossed so I could have a glance at that machine in a very soon time
  12. 1 point
    Dr. Mike

    Holes in bone models with democratiz3D

    I'd like to elaborate on this topic a bit, as I recently had another member inquire about this issue. The member was creating a model from a CT scan of the clavicles. As you can see, there are holes in the medial (midline) ends of both clavicles. What is causing this? Is it a problem with democratiz3D? How can it be fixed? The issue lies with the patient's anatomy and the quality of the original CT scan. In the human body there are areas where bones are naturally very thin. Sometimes, the bone surface (cortex) can be paper thin. Also, some patients who have conditions like osteoporosis may have very little calcium in their bones. Issues like this make it very hard for the CT scanner to detect the bone wall, as you can see from the image below which shows the area on the left clavicle that has a hole in the final model (red arrow). The problem isn't with democratiz3D, but with the quality of the CT scan or with the patient having thin bones (how dare they!). democratiz3D is actually creating the model exactly as it appears on the CT, its just that the CT has holes we don't want! So, what can be done? If you encounter this problem you have two options. 1) Manually fix the holes in the model with a mesh editor like Meshmixer, or 2) decrease the threshold value in democratiz3D and re-process the scan. Decreasing the threshold tells the system to capture more voxels in your model, potentially capturing more thin or osteoporotic bone. But, be careful. If you reduce the threshold too much (less than 100), you run the risk of starting to capture muscle, organs, and vessels in your bone model. If you are not sure what threshold to use, you can experiment by running your scan through democratiz3D using different thresholds. To save time, I suggest you do this on low or medium quality setting. When you find a threshold that works, you can generate your final model using a higher (and more time consuming) quality setting, like High or Ultra. If you are familiar with mesh editing software, that is probably the fastest way to correct this problem. Just delete the edge of the hole, fill it in with a new face, and run a quick smooth operation on the area. It's a 1 minute fix if you know the keyboard shortcuts. I hope this tip helps. Dr. Mike
  13. 1 point
    Mike, we use college kids to run our 3d department they are engineering students or biology majors or sometimes graphic arts majors so they all know CAD design and anatomy but the rest is just winging it We have over 50 printers churning out 3d patient models 24/7 The containers are self-produced they are basically designed for dog food so they have a seal on the lid. The hygrometers are cheap and crappy on eBay or Amazon. The fittings to connect the PTFE tubing is on Thingiverse as well as the roller spool holders I think the later is called TUSH or something similar. You will need standard roller bearings the type used in fidget spinners 4 per spool again Amazon or eBay Each costs about $25 total and about 3 hours of printing time to print all the parts The commercial boxes like the one you suggested is a total rip off as are the dedicated filament driers We bought a REALLY high-end fruit jerky dryer in stainless for like $80 on eBay and it holds several rolls at a time Sorry I don't have actual links to send you to for the various files and or products but the one is here https://www.amazon.com/IRIS-Nesting-Airtight-Container-Large/dp/B007RBB6UI/ref=sr_1_5?s=pet-supplies&ie=UTF8&qid=1526232975&sr=1-5&keywords=dog+food+storage That is the dog food container Get back to me if you can't find the rest I will get one of the kids to help us out here Dr. D
  14. 1 point
    Mike We use a food dehydrator for ALL of our filament We simply toss the rolls inside and turn it up to max which is significantly lower than the alteration point of all commercial filaments and then dry them for 12 hours and IMMEDIATELY remove them to a plastic container that has a series of spool rollers inside and outlets for the filament to exit. The containers have gaskets so no leaking The filament is never allowed to see the humidity of Florida it goes from dehydrator (or the new box) then into the container which has 2 pounds of rechargeable desiccant as well as a digital hygrometer inside it than thru PTFE tubing to the extruders of the dedicated printer next in line to be used. The added length of PTFE does add a BIT to the retraction issues of the printers but they do fine once adjusted The containers hold about 6 rolls of filament Hope this helps Dr. Dave
  15. 1 point
    I was recently asked this question and I am sharing the answer with the group in hopes that somebody will find it helpful. Question: "I am a teacher at a High School in Arizona, we recently built a FAB LAB (digital fabrication facility) and are interested in starting a medical imaging class/club. We have several medical professionals, Dentist, Orthopedic Surgeon, General Practice, Physical Therapist and Medical researchers, who are interested in volunteering in to help with this program. Our goal is twofold, one to increase student interest in pursuing medical professions and two to give students an avenue for employment in the emerging 3D medical imaging field. Ultimately our goal would be to have a Career and Technical Education (CTE) program where students could graduate with some sort of certificate indicating competency. My question is, are there recommended training/certification programs that we need to consider and implement? What are your recommendations for us moving forward with this program. Any information you could provide would be appreciated." Answer: " Hello ______ Just to clarify, are you talking about medical 3D Printing? If so, there is currently no such certification program in this technology. One basic requirement is an understanding of medical imaging technologies, so I would say a bare minimum to do medical 3D printing would be a certification as a CT or MRI technologist, which have established training pathways for post-secondary education. Here is a link. https://study.com/ct_technician.html You would then have to obtain experience with 3D printing, of which there is no formal pathway. Of course, you can obtain greater imaging expertise as a radiologist, which is 4 years of med school and 6 of residency and fellowship after college. Again, there is still no formal pathway for the actual 3D printing component of this. Hope this helps."
  16. 1 point
    This week we want to share with the embodi3D community the seven most downloaded models from the dental, orthodontic and maxillofacial category. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, as well as the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. The most downloaded file is an STL model of a woman's mandible. This model was 3D printed by an embodi3D member with excellent results. Be sure to click through and check out this STL file and images of the resulting 3D dental print. The list also includes other great 3D dental models. You might be interested in our list of top 10 human heart STL files or our list of free human anatomy STL files including brain, heart, mandible and spine. We also have a list of the ten most downloaded 3D printable STL files on embodi3d.com. Don’t forget to register and download the STL files so you can 3D print the models yourself. Please reply to this post with which model you like best. 1. An excellent 3D model of a woman's mandible with great detail. 2. This model was created from a conebeam CT and segmented on itk-snap. 3. A highly detailed dental scan shows the bony anatomy of the maxilla, mandible and facial structures in great detail. 4. 3D model of the mandibula with details of the teeth 5. A 3d model of the mandible for implant study. 6. Digital model of the orbit with the frontal bone shown. 7. A beautiful STL file 3D model of parasymphyseal and subcondylar mandibular fractures. Please reply to this post with which model you like best or if you know of a good file which should be included post it here. References 1. Dawood, A., Marti, B. M., Sauret-Jackson, V., & Darwood, A. (2015). 3D printing in dentistry. British dental journal, 219(11), 521.
  17. 1 point
    Nevit has done some tremendous work. Check out his blog article on using Osirix to create color MRAs. http://nevit.blogspot.com.tr/2018/04/how-to-creat-color-mr-angiography-using.html
  18. 1 point
    Shannan, I was able to print the slices without having to go through Meshmixer. I am using a Prusa MK3 i3 and just put the files in the Slic3r PE and it printed flawlessly. the slicer did find few holes but they were automatically fixed. Look at my review and you will be able to see the result. Eric
  19. 1 point
    Dr. Mike

    Valve Geometry

    Valves are tough. You would have to get a high resolution EKG-gated coronary CTA most probably. EKG-gating is necessary to avoid blurring of the values. I don't know of any datasets off-hand. Anyone in the community know of any?
  20. 1 point
    Babies in womb please to try to print them with 3d printer! Thank you!
  21. 1 point
    kopachini

    3D skull with thickness?

    Hi, look at the category downloads - bones - skull and head. there should be plenty of skull models. https://www.embodi3d.com/files/category/12-skull-and-head/
  22. 1 point
    Dr. Mike

    making guides

    Here is a freeware tutorial I wrote for a presentation at RSNA. In it, I discuss the latest information from the FDA on when it is OK to use non-FDA reviewed software.
  23. 1 point
    There are two excellent upcoming conferences that will have lots of information on medical 3D printing. I will be attending and speaking at both. If you are able, please attend. 1) Radiological Society of North American (RSNA) November 26 to Dec 1, 2017. Chicago, IL http://www.rsna.org/Annual_Meeting.aspx 2) Mayo Clinic Collaborative 3D Printing in Medical Practice 2018, Feb 23-25, Scottsdale, Arizona. https://radiologyeducation.mayo.edu/store/collaborative-3d-printing-in-medical-practice-2018
  24. 1 point
  25. 1 point
    Dr. Mike

    3d printing baby

    Very cool. Thanks for sharing!
  26. 1 point
    phily

    3d printing baby

    we are making 3d printed babies based on the 3d ultrasound data. we also convert 3d ultrasound data to stl file and make it ready to print. we are interested to cooperate with any clinics from all over the world. please visit our website and let us know what you guys think about this topic. website: https://3dnini.jimdo.com/
  27. 1 point
    kopachini

    Philips IntelliSpace Portal

    The process of .stl file acquisition is as simple as it gets: in 3D VRT you just rightclick and click Save as .stl file, than you choose where to save it (like USB stick) Img 1 and 2. This model making could be done on CT studies made on Philips CTs, but it is possible to import DICOM data from other CT (Siemens) to Philips IntelliSpace Portal from our PACS. Today I spoke to tech guy in my department and he will try to connect Siemens Syngo with Philips IntelliSpace Portal for direct data transfer. I have to try import MR studies into this portal, but that is something I am not giving too much hope because this is totally different modality. For a try I took a study from a young female injured in a car accident with broken ilium bone. Slices were 1,5 mm thick, CTA of aorta and pelvic arteries were performed. CAD model of bone structures (pelvis and spine) looked really good. Surface was quite smooth and there was no cascade artifacts... nothing that couldn't be fixed with smooth modifier or in meshmixer . Img 3, 4 and 5. Since this was young persons study, I am wondering how it would look with older person study (degenerative changes in bones, osteopenia... probably there will be more artifacts, missing parts of bones). The only problem I noticed was with another CAD model of cranium (orbital floor, nasal septum and conchae, ethmoid cellulas), thin or lower density bones, respectively. As mentioned earlier, these are thinner bones so a lot of artifacts have emerged which could make some difficulties later on. Img 6 and 7. For the urgent and bigger models making I would say this is excellent technique that SAVES A LOT of TIME. If you are looking for more detailed and accurate models without big artifacts I would recommend manual/semimanual segmentation. Secondly, I wanted to make review about vascular CAD model made with this technique. Since vascular models are basically nothing but a contrast-blood mixture the final product greatly depends of contrast concentration inside vessel lumen in time of acquisition. This again greatly depends of heart contractility, blood flow etc. Contrast inhomogenicity inside vessels can produce artifacts (like relative thinning of vessel; "stenosis" would be inappropriate word, and missing parts of vessels) Img 8. If some contrast enters the veins merging of the veins and arterie can occur, Img 9. For roughly accurate 3D models, and for urgent need for models this is a very good model making technique, but if you seek a very precise models, again I would recommend manual segmentation. Soft tissue models is something that I have to try and CTA of the brain.
  28. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    21 downloads

    The cervical spine is the upper most spines forming the spinal column, extending from the skull base to the level of the thoracic vertebra (the spines with attached ribs). The cervical spines are usually seven and the main function is to support the skull and to protect the spinal cord. Apart from the first cervical vertebra (atlas) and the second vertebra (axis), the other vertebral bodies share a general anatomical appearance: Oval shaped vertebral bodies with wide vertebral arch, large vertebral foramina and long spinous processes. This particular model shows parts of the mandible as well as the hyoid bone. This 3D model was created from the file STS_044. The source scan used to create this file can be found here.

    Free

  29. 1 point
    froth

    Lumen of vessel in 3D Slicer

    I am not sure if dealing with solidify modifier is safe procedure. I tried a lot, every time something was wrong. I mean complex geometries of lumen with irregular narrowing from thrombus or atherosclerosis. Every time I lost the ideal lumen of the vessel. Some solution to it, is shrink-wrap modifier, but to be honest it has big limitation like you mention before. I don't think that it would handle with dissections either. So for that moment, I think we don't have perfect solution to mirror the ideal anatomy of vessel lumen. We can be close, but not accurate. Maybe Dr. Mike has different opinion? The second aspect is segmentation. What program you recommend ? Osiris or slicer? I think that when we use the threshold for Hounsfield units for contrast medium , we also segment part of calcium atherosclerosis which has very big Hounsfield value. Around plaque segmentation see a transition zone which corresponds the value of Hounsfield for contrast medium which we see as very irregular surface. Of course we do smoothing as post processing in blender, however its not dealing perfectly with it. Even if it does, we lose ideal shape of lumen. So same again, we are close but not accurate. If anybody knows how to deal with these problem, please share with me.
  30. 1 point
    kopachini

    Lumen of vessel in 3D Slicer

    I don't fill those surfaces, I use solidify modifier so there is no need to merge two edges after offset. And, maybe it is confusing, but even when you do solidify or whatever, you will still have "hidden space" between two surfaces (inner/outer shell...). When printing, 3D printer doesn't recognise that space as empty yet it is prints it as solid, full...
  31. 1 point
    froth

    Lumen of vessel in 3D Slicer

    I closed the cut edges of outer and inner surface with extrude and scale but still is a hidden space between these to layers. I think this is the reason why i Have problem with proper use of boolean modifier to later add the supports to the model. So what are yours method of filling these two surface?
  32. 1 point
    Dr. Mike

    3D slicer set up for windows 10

    Glad that worked out. I am also using Slicer (64 bit) and Windows 10 and it works fine.
  33. 1 point
    Dr. Mike

    Teeth Micro CT

    Amazing how the freeware (3D Slicer) works better than the expensive proprietary software (Mimics), at least for this application.
  34. 1 point
    Shanevinmc

    3D slicer set up for windows 10

    Hi, I found out the problem and it was my own fault. My computer is a hp probook with windows 10 and a 32 Bit processor and I was attempting to install the 64 bit package. Since this I have downloaded a previous 32 bit version that works fine. Thanks
  35. 1 point
    There seems to be lots of interest in this community regarding 3D printing from ultrasound images. Does anybody know of resources available to show how to do it? I'm sure many here would be interested.
  36. 1 point
    For those of you in the Boston area, I will be speaking at the Formlabs FUSE conference on June 6, taking place at MIT. This is the main Formlabs user conference. Here is a schedule. I hope to see you there! Dr. Mike
  37. 1 point
    ebombmx

    HGNmandible

    Version 1.0.0

    71 downloads

    My Mandible This is a model i used to test my ability to get a 3d printed model out of a CT (conebeam). Segmented on itk-snap.

    Free

  38. 1 point
    Jack K

    Left Bony Labyrinth

    I was really impressed with the amount of detail that has gone into this model.As someone who has just started researching the structure of the inner ear; the combination of this model and "Temporal Bone Left"has given me a greater appreciation for where everything is in relation to each other. My only concern about the model was that the stirrup wasn't present. However it is understandable as it is quite a small bone. Disclaimer: I used this model for creating an image rather than 3D printing.
  39. 1 point
    gkross

    openbiteupdated

    Version 1.0.0

    109 downloads

    ct of jaws open bite threshold update 04/28/17, open bite, ct without contrast, axial, dicom, bone, teeth, canine, maxilla

    Free

  40. 1 point
    It's been a while since I posted some of the things I've been up to. Here is a model of a project we just completed to design 3D printable abdominal organ and vessel models for medical device testing. These were each custom designed, printed in sintered nylon, and professionally painted.
  41. 1 point
    Dr. Murali Krishna

    11 unnamed

    Version 1.0.0

    6 downloads

    denture scan , atrophy, axial, dicom, neck, head, stl, ct without contrast, dental, bone, mandibular, mandible, maxilla

    Free

  42. 1 point
    FerGazz

    ".dicom" to ".stl" softwares

    Thank you for the reply! I will definitely try 3D slicer to. I just validated a trial license for Mimics and 3-matic today. I received a brief tutorial from Materialise and would like guidance from other tutorials (in videos or documents) to use it.
  43. 1 point
    Please note that any references to “Imag3D” in this tutorial has been replaced with “democratiz3D” In this tutorial you will learn how to create multiple 3D printable bone models simultaneously using the free online CT scan to bone STL converter, democratiz3D. We will use the free desktop program Slicer to convert our CT scan in DICOM format to NRRD format. We will also make a small section of the CT scan into its own NRRD file to create a second stand-alone model. The NRRD files will then be uploaded to the free democratiz3D online service to be converted into 3D printable STL models. If you haven't already, please see the tutorial A Ridiculously Easy Way to Convert CT Scans to 3D Printable Bone STL Models for Free in Minutes, which provides a good overview of the democratiz3D service. You should download the file pack that accompanies this tutorial. This contains an anonymized DICOM data set that will allow you to follow along with the tutorial. >>> DOWNLOAD THE TUTORIAL FILE PACK <<< Step 1: Register for an Embodi3D account If you haven't already done so, you'll need to register for an embodi3D account. Registration is free and only takes a minute. Once you are registered you'll receive a confirmatory email that verifies you are the owner of the registered email account. Click the link in the email to activate your account. The democratiz3D service will use this email account to send you notifications when your files are ready for download. Step 2: Create NRRD Files from DICOM with Slicer Open Slicer, which can be downloaded for free from www.slicer.org. Take the folder that contains your DICOM scan files and drag and drop it onto the slicer window, as shown in Figure 1. If you downloaded the tutorial file pack, a complete DICOM data set is included. Click OK when asked to load the study into the DICOM database. Click Copy when asked if you want to copy the images into the local database directory. Remember, this only works with CT scans. MRIs cannot be converted at this time. Figure 1: Dragging and dropping the DICOM folder onto the Slicer application. This will load the CT scan. A NRRD file that encompasses the entire scan can easily be created by clicking the save button at this point. Before we do that however, we are going to create a second NRRD file that only contains the lumbar spine, which will allow us to create a second 3D printable bone model of the lumbar spine. Open the CT scan by clicking on the Show DICOM Browser button, selecting the scan and series within the scan, and clicking the Load button. The CT scan will then load within the multipanel viewer. From the drop-down menu at the top left of the Slicer window, select All Modules and then Crop Volume, as shown in Figure 2. You will now want to create a Region Of Interest (ROI) to encompass the smaller volume we want to make. Turn on the ROI visibility button and then under the Input ROI drop-down menu, select "Create new AnnotationROI," As shown in Figure 3. Figure 2: Choosing the Crop Volume module Figure 3: Turn on ROI visibility and Create a new AnnotationROI under the Input ROI drop-down menu. A small cube will then be displayed in the blue volume window. This represents the sub volume that will be made. In its default position, the cube may not overlay the body, and may need to be dragged downward. Grab a control point on the cube and drag it downward (inferiorly) as shown in Figure 4. Figure 4: Grab the sub volume ROI and drag it downwards until it overlaps with the body. Next, use the control points on the volume box to position the volume box over the portion of the scan you wish to be included in the small 3D printable model, as shown in Figure 5. Figure 5: Adjusting the control points on the crop volume box. Once you have the box position where you want it, initiate the volume crop by clicking the Crop! button, as shown in Figure 6. Figure 6: The Crop! button You have now have two scan volumes that can be 3D printed. The first is the entire scan, and the second is the smaller sub volume that contains only the lumbar spine. We are now going to save those individual volumes as NRRD files. Click the Save button in the upper left-hand corner. In the Save Scene window, uncheck all items that do not have NRRD as the file format, as shown in Figure 7. Only NRRD file should be checked. Be sure to specify the directory that you want each file to be saved in. Figure 7: The Save Scene window Your NRRD files should now be saved in the directory you specified. Step 3: Upload your NRRD files and Convert to STL Files Using the Free democratiz3D Service Launch your web browser and go to www.embodi3d.com. If you haven't already register for a account. Registration is free and only takes a minute. Click on the democratiz3D navigation item and select Launch App, as shown in Figure 8. Figure 8: launching the democratiz3D application. Drag-and-drop both of your NRRD files onto the upload panel. Fill in the required fields, including a title, short description, privacy setting (private versus shared), and license type. You must agree to the terms of use. Please note that even though license type is a required field, it only matters if the file is shared. If you keep the file private and thus not available to other members on the site, they will not see it nor be able to download it. Be sure to turn on the democratiz3D Processing slider! If you don't turn this on your file will not be processed but will just be saved in your account on the website. It should be green when turned on. Once you turn on democratiz3D Processing, you'll be presented with some basic processing options, as shown in Figure 9. Leave the default operation as "CT NRRD to Bone STL," which is the operation that creates a basic bone model from a CT scan in NRRD format. Threshold is the Hounsfield attenuation to use for selecting the bones. The default value of 150 is good for most applications, but if you have a specialized model you wish to create, you can adjust this value. Quality denotes the number of polygons in your output file. High-quality may take longer to process and produce larger files. These are more appropriate for very large or detailed structures, such as an entire spinal column. Low quality is best for small structures that are geometrically simple, such as a patella. Medium quality is balanced, and is appropriate for most circumstances. Figure 9: The democratiz3D File Processing Parameters. Once you are satisfied with your processing parameters, click submit. Both of your nrrd files will be processed in two separate bone STL files, as shown in Figure 10. The process takes 10 to 20 minutes and you will receive an email notifying you that your files are ready. Please note, the stl processing will finish first followed by the images. Click on the thumbnails for each model to access the file for download or click the title. Figure 10: Two files have been processed simultaneously and are ready for download Step 4: CT scan conversion is complete your STL bone model files are ready for 3D Printing That's it! Both of your bone models are ready for 3D printing. I hope you enjoyed this tutorial. Please use the democratiz3D service and SHARE the files you create with the community by changing their status from private or shared. Thank you very much and happy 3D printing!
  44. 1 point
    Dr. M

    Brock Mandible

    Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    Case study for mandibular bone graft, axial, dicom, stl, bone, 3dmodel,

    Free

  45. 1 point
    hainebeck

    Joeladaptado

    Version 1.0.0

    16 downloads

    Joeladaptado, canine, dicom, stl, axial, head, maxilla, teeth, 3dmodel, ct without contrast

    Free

  46. 1 point
    cosmos1985

    MAXILAR SUPERIOR

    Version 1.0.0

    7 downloads

    maxilar superior a maxima calidad threshold 270 hueso sin detallar, ct without contrast, stl, bone, 3dmodel, dicom, head, axial, teeth, canine

    Free

  47. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    Impacted maxillary canine, dental, canine, teeth, stl, maxilla, bone, ct without contrast, palate, head, neck

    Free

  48. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    38 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file contains a model of the thorax was derived from a medical CT scan. It shows the heart and aorta as they reside in the chest. This model was created using the democratiz3D 3D model creation service 0522c0878 CAPw

    Free

  49. 1 point
    1977: Why would anybody want to use a computer? 1994: Why would anybody want to use the Internet? 2016: Why would anybody want to use 3D printing? I'm glad that you and the members of this community are open minded. This technology is the future, and with it we are going to change medicine and patient care for the better.
  50. 1 point
    Dear Carlos, I am glad you found this tutorial helpful. If you have any comments or questions, feel free to post them on the Embodi3D website. Probably the best place to ask a question is in the forums. Good luck!
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