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  1. 3 points
    Allen

    3D Printing Safety Tips for Kids

    Now that STEM education is being pushed to the forefront, 3D printers are increasingly becoming more common parts of classrooms around the world. This is a welcome development, of course, as 3D printing and other more advanced manufacturing technologies may prove to be vital parts of one’s skill set in the near future. This development presents an important question – how safe are 3D printers for kids? Can teachers leave students to use 3D printers unsupervised? What safety measures can schools and teachers take to ensure that no untoward incidents happen when kids work with 3D printers? The hazards of 3D printing The first step in establishing effective safety practices is to acknowledge that there are inherent hazards to 3D printing. After all, you’re still dealing with a machine with parts that can be heated beyond 200 °C. If you need to teach kids about using 3D printers, then you might as well tell them about the following hazards as well: Moving parts There are a lot of moving parts in a 3D printer, almost all of which are driven by the rotation of stepper motors. While these gears are typically inaccessible, it’s much easier for the smaller fingers of children to get caught within these moving parts. It’s good practice for both kids and adults to refrain from touching the moving parts of a 3D printer while printing is ongoing. Heat Heat is an important part of 3D printing. It also provides some of its most pervasive hazards. Depending on the filament you’re working with, you might have an extruder temperature that goes as high as 200 to 250 °C. Most 3D printers also have heated print beds that can be heated close to 100 °C. The filament material, of course, is also very hot when it comes out of the extruder nozzle. These are things to watch out for, especially if you’re dealing with a bunch of curious children. Fumes When 3D printing, massive heat is applied to the plastic filament materials. Different filaments react in different ways to this heat, but it is much safer to assume that they all release fumes that can range from irritating to downright toxic. Even if you can’t smell anything, the pressure and heat of extrusion also release plastic micro-particles which can result in long-term respiratory problems in humans. Tools Aside from the 3D printer itself, completing or finishing 3D printing projects will often involve the use of other tools. Some of these tools are sharp and can still cause injury when used improperly or without proper supervision. If absolutely necessary, you may have to incorporate training for using these tools into your 3D printing class. However, there are tools that are simply too dangerous to leave in the hands of small children. In listing down these potential hazards, one must always recognize that children are naturally curious and that they might not have developed a sufficient level of motor skills to work with small parts or tools. This means that there must always be a context in the development of safety practices – a different set of rules will be needed between middle schoolers and very young students. Best 3D printing safety practices for kids The best safety measure is one that eliminates the hazard completely. If this cannot be done, the next best thing is to reduce the hazard or prevent access to it. These will be our guiding principles in formulating safety measures for kids for 3D printing education. Get a 3D printer with an enclosure The best way to keep the kids away from the moving or hot parts of a 3D printer is to simply isolate them. Fortunately, a lot of the new desktop-scale 3D printers being sold nowadays come with built-in enclosures. Models from Flashforge, Dremel, and Monoprice are some good options. These are ideal because they provide protection and isolate the fumes of 3D printing while still allowing students to watch while the 3D printing process unfolds. The physical barrier is highly effective in discouraging kids from poking and prodding the 3D printer while it is still running. You can also set these 3D printers to stop operations as soon as the enclosure or cover is removed, ensuring that no accidents happen even if you’re not actively supervising. Place warning stickers on parts that can get hot We realize that warning stickers don’t always work, especially with kids, but it’s still a good idea to have them, nonetheless. They are a good indicator of which parts of the 3D printer get hot. This is a lesson that most people get to learn the hard way, after all. For best results, we suggest sticking warning labels that are colored bright red. Make sure to use stickers that are actually meant for use in high temperatures, lest you end up with one that gets washed out after just a few weeks. Inspect the 3D printer before use A major responsibility of the instructor is to inspect the 3D printers before use to check for any signs of damage. If there are any exposed wires, then it might be a good idea to have the printer repaired first. Do not touch any parts of a 3D printer while it is running A good general rule of thumb is to tell your students that under no circumstance should they touch any of the parts of a 3D printer while it is still running except for the control panel. This rule applies to students of all ages as well as to you as the instructor – yes, this is a great opportunity to lead by example. Avoid crowding around the 3D printer while it is running Even with all safeguards in place, it is best to enforce a minimum distance between your students and the 3D printer while it is still running. Not only does this help prevent curious fingers from prodding the machine, but it also lessens their exposure to a 3D printer’s harmful fumes. Letting them watch the 3D printer from about five feet away should let them appreciate the process without exposing them to unnecessary hazards. Do not eat or drink near the 3D printer It’s a good idea to treat your 3D printing class like you would a chemistry laboratory – everyone should be wearing the proper protective equipment while working, and there should be no eating or drinking in class. Any food or drink has the potential of getting contaminated with the chemical fumes that 3D printing releases. A spilled drink will also be bad news for any electronics and can result in some extreme accidents. Have students wear goggles, gloves, and respiratory protection A 3D printing class is an excellent avenue to teach students about general safety. Part of safety is making sure that you are wearing safety equipment appropriate to the activity you are doing. In the case of 3D printing, you will want to wear protection for your eyes, mouth, and nose to avoid chemical inhalation or contamination. Heat-resistant gloves are also recommended whenever you need to touch potentially hot parts. Since chemical fumes could be anywhere in the classroom, we recommend having all the students wear eye and breathing protection whenever a 3D printer is running as long as they are in the same room. Make sure to use masks that have been specially designed for chemical fumes and not just common particulates. Print in a well-ventilated area If you have the option to open windows during printing, then do so. This will help disperse the fumes that 3D printers emit. This is a recommended measure even if you’re using a fully enclosed 3D printer with a dedicated filtered vent. If your room does not have large windows, then you might want to reconsider relocating your class to somewhere with better ventilation. Only print with PLA PLA is probably the friendliest filament to work with if you’re teaching 3D printing to kids. It prints at lower temperatures, does not need a heated printing bed, and does not release unpleasant fumes. PLA also isn’t as prone to warping as other 3D printing filaments, making it less likely for your students to go through the frustrating experience of having to start a 3D printing project all over. Watch out for signs of asthma, allergy, or any flu-like symptoms There’s a good chance that the kids in your class have not been exposed to the type of chemical fumes that 3D printers release. Even with breathing protection, you will need to keep a close eye on your students and watch out for adverse reactions. If any of your students show signs of difficulty breathing or allergic reactions, then it would be best to have them step outside the room right away. Get in touch with medical personnel if symptoms don’t improve after a few minutes. As with most safety guidelines, it’s equally important to be receptive to adding or revising the rules as you see fit. Different facilities may require a different set of rules depending on the goals of the course and the available equipment. Final thoughts It wasn’t that long ago when ‘shop class’ was a common thing in schools. Learning woodworking is no longer as common nowadays and have been replaced by more tech-oriented fields. With schools opening courses on 3D printing, we feel it our duty to try and provide assistance on how they can keep these classes safe. The good news is that a lot of desktop-scale 3Dprinters for sale today have been pretty well-designed when it comes to safety. If you can get an enclosed 3D printer with an integrated HEPA filter vent, then that’s already half the battle won. The post 3D Printing Safety Tips for Kids appeared first on 3D Insider. View the full article
  2. 2 points
    kopachini

    Postprocessing 3D prints

    Some of you could see it on my Instagram account, but for those who didn't, here are some of the tips if you want a really transparent and water tight models: use Polymaker PolySmooth transparent or Prusament PVB filament. According to Prusa you should set layer height to 0.3mm, but I print with 0.2 mm layer height with very satisfying results. Wall thickness 0.6 (you could make 0.8mm but as thicker it gets, model is less transparent so I didn't go at 0.8mm, maybe once I will try). After the print scrape away some irregularities and after that you can put it in chamber for vapor smoothing with isopropyl alcohol. If you don't own one (as me) just spray the model (inside and outside) with IPA for smoothing results. Don't be aggressive as too much alcohol on the model softens and dissolves PVB so it is better to spray a little bit than after drying, spray it again. Bellow is the example of my aorta model and you can see catheter and guidewire really well.
  3. 2 points

    Version 1.0.1

    5 downloads

    24 file model of the complete human spine including each vertebrae of the thoracic, lumbar and cervical sections derived from a high quality CT scan. STL files are manifold and high quality totalling 166,000 triangles. The model demonstrates the detailed anatomy of the spine and is ideal for educational purposes, as medical reference or as a gift for medical professionals. Individual STLs: 24 Mesh integrity: manifold STL (watertight) Triangles: 166k total To scale dimensions: 148 x 134 x 535 mm Additional supports may be needed to print the various components

    $6.99

  4. 2 points
    Selami

    Segmentation Work Price advice?..

    Hi Frends, I plan to serve segmentetation job professionally which I also finished web site about it. But i am not sure about prices of such of a job that I can do. You can see one of my segmentation work below, which I also work on it with 3d programs. I can do more than 3 such kind of job in a day which depends how complex it is. For your opinion how much should I ask such kind of job? Best Regards Selami Please use link below to see 3D FBX file to see the file, hope you enjoy it. https://v.creators3d.com/index.html?load=%2Fviews%2Fproduction%2Fitem%2F20201222%2F6331376031150221%2F6331376031150221.glb&autorotate=true&json-data=1608605817591&decrypt=1&webp=1&gzip=true&tv=120&exp=1.62&hdr-intensity=0.9&hdr=18&hdr-blur=true
  5. 2 points
    Researchers from the Korea-based Asan Medical Center have 3D printed surgical guides that could help cancer patients to retain more of their breasts after surgery. The scientists found during testing that they were not only able to customize their devices to each patient, but they could save tissue up to 1cm from the tumor. In […] View the full article
  6. 2 points
    As one of the most well-known names in the 3D printing industry, Czech-based Prusa Research has built a solid reputation bolstered by the excellent quality of their 3D printers. The open-source model adopted by manufacturer Josef Prusa has helped make the development of these printers a work done by the community. Right now, Prusa sells four 3D printer models, all of which are relatively affordable and highly reviewed. If you want to get in on this action, then here’s a detailed guide on which Prusa 3D printer you should go for, regardless of your level of experience. 1. Original Prusa Mini Price: $349.00 Launch date: Late 2019 Ideal for: Beginners, users with limited space As the name implies, the Original Prusa Mini is a highly compact 3D printer that offers all the best features of the full-sized Prusa models. This is also their entry into the budget market – it costs less than half the price of Prusa’s flagship 3D printer, the Original Prusa I3 MK3S. With its small 380 x 330 mm footprint, the Original Prusa Mini is the perfect 3D printer for those who don’t have a lot of space to work. Of course, this also means that the build volume of the Prusa Mini is fairly limited at 180 x 180 x 180 mm. This is something you’ll have to deal with but all the brilliant design elements we have come to expect from Prusa are there – from the magnetic steel print bed to the colored LCD screen interface. The Prusa Mini comes almost fully disassembled when it ships, so expect to spend between 1 to 2 hours for assembly. A lot of thought has gone into making the assembly instructions as intuitive and easy to follow as possible, so even beginners should find this whole experience fun. To help keep the Prusa Mini small, it comes with a Bowden-style extruder. Much has been said and written about the complications of using a Bowden extruder, and all those pretty much still manifest in the Prusa Mini. With a longer path for the filament to travel, the Bowden Extruder can clog more frequently than you care for. If this happens, you may need to loosen the extruder gear or replace the PTFE lining of the hot end completely to get the filament running again. Aside from that hiccup, the Prusa Mini has elements that make it very beginner-friendly. It ships with the PrusaSlice slicer software which has now been updated with a profile for the Mini. You can run the slicer in Simple mode which only gives the most basic parameters to adjust, or you can switch over to Expert mode for more customization options. Loading of files into the Prusa Mini can be done either via a USB cable or online through the printer’s Ethernet port. The color LCD screen of the Prusa Mini is also a very useful tool for starting up and monitoring the status of the project. At the onset, the screen displays the estimated time it will take for the project to finish and how much filament it will consume. The display then updates as printing progresses to show the total elapsed time. One of the best features of the Prusa Mini (and other Prusa printers) is the removable magnetic print bed. Not only can the bed be heated up to 100 C, but it has also been coated with PEI to help with bed adhesion and can be easily popped off the printer to facilitate removal of your finished print. It works great in most cases, although the temperature limitation of the bed can be problematic in some cases. According to Prusa, the Mini can work with a selection of filament materials that include PLA, ABS, PETG, ASA, and ABS. The maximum temperature that the extruder can reach is 280 C, which should theoretically be hot enough to print with Nylon. However, warping can be a problem because of the limited bed temperature. If you’re planning on printing with Nylon or ABS, it would be a good idea to use a DIY enclosure. The Prusa Mini lacks an empty filament sensor (only available as an optional upgrade) or any print resume function. This is presumably a move to help keep the price of the printer down and is not a deal-breaker in any way. Overall, the Original Prusa Mini is a compelling product for those who want to get into 3D printing but aren’t willing to spend $500 to $1000 on their first 3D printer. Prusa seems to have designed the Mini specifically to be beginner-friendly with the level of care and quality that we have come to expect from the brand. 2. Original Prusa i3 MK3S Price: $749.00 (kit) or $999.00 (assembled) Launch date: Early 2020 Ideal for: Experienced users The flagship of the Prusa brand, the i3 MK3S is Prusa’s follow-up to the award-winning MK2S printer. Even with lofty expectations, the i3 MK3S has managed to impress just about every industry expert and has been repeatedly declared as the best 3D printer of 2020 by several review sites. Simply put, this 3D printer benefits from all the lessons learned from the other Prusa models that came before it. It features improvements in the empty filament sensor, extruder design, and slicer software. Combined with the old and reliable features, the i3 MK3S is simply described as a 3D printer that works without being too complicated to use. The beefier i3 MK3S can accommodate a maximum build volume of 250 x 210 x 200 mm, which should be enough for all but the exceptionally large 3D printing projects. As with previous iterations, its printhead is mounted on rails that allow movement in both the X-axis and Z-axis, while the print bed is free to move along the Y-axis. This design helps with rigidity and eases the movement requirement of the print bed, allowing for printing that is more precise, faster, and quieter. The i3 MK3S uses a direct extruder which has been redesigned with two extruder gears. This makes the handling of all filament types, including flexible ones, less problematic. The extruder has also been redesigned to allow access and replacement of the PTFE tubing without having to take apart the entire extruder assembly. The magnetic PEI-coated print bed is back in the i3 MK3S. This time, Prusa offers both a smooth PEI sheet and a textured PEI sheet for better adhesion. The bed temperature can reach a maximum of 120 C, while the hot end temperature can be heated up to 200 C. At these temperatures, printing with filaments like Nylon, ABS, or Polycarbonate should no longer be a problem, although you might still need an enclosure. An all-metal hot end contributes as well to making the i3 MK3S as versatile as possible in terms of filament compatibility. The Prusa i3 MK3S is a fairly “smart” 3D printer. It comes with an automatic bed leveling feature and has a “Power Panic” mode which kicks in if there is a loss of power. Once the printer detects a power interruption, it shuts down all heating systems and saves the status of the current print job so you can pick up right where you left off when the power comes back. The i3 MK3S comes with the Prusa Slic3r, a slicer software that is powerful yet intuitive and easy to use. This version of the slicer has been upgraded with more profile options, easily allowing users to swap between “Speed” and “Quality” modes. The Prusa i3 MK3S isn’t exactly cheap, but it’s easily one of the most reliable, yet easy to use, 3D printers available right now. The various quality-of-life improvements that Prusa has made with this 3D printer has rounded it out into one of the best they have ever developed. Prusa also offers top-notch customer service should you run into any problems. This printer is highly recommended for users with a moderate level of experience who are considering offering commercial 3D printing services. 3. Original Prusa i3 Multi Material 2S Upgrade Kit Price: $299 IDEAL FOR: Long-time owners of the Prusa i3 MK3S This is not a separate 3D printer but is instead just an upgrade to the Original Prusa i3 MK3S. The technology has been around for a couple of years but has now been updated to its best version in the MMU2S. This kit is also compatible with the MK2.5 and MK3 versions of the Prusa i3 printers. Like the older versions, the MMU2S is designed to handle switching between up to five different filaments. It’s basically a print head replacement for the Prusa i3 MK3S, although saying it that way may be understating just how complex the setup can be. Assembly of the MMU2S is just slightly more complicated than the assembly of the MK3S printer itself, in case you ordered it as a kit. Thus, we recommend getting familiar with the components of your 3D printer before going ahead and ordering this upgrade. Prusa has made a lot of improvements in this version of the Multi Material upgrade. It now has a direct extruder (instead of Bowden) and just a single PTFE tube to lead the selected filament into the extruder. It also benefits from the new hybrid mechanical-optical filament sensor of the i3 MK3S, as well as its Bondtech double extruder gears. The MMU2S kit comes with an external filament buffer which helps prevent filament entanglement and makes it so much easier to position the five filament spools relative to the printer. It seamlessly integrates into the smart systems of the i3 MK3S and can also detect and recover from power loss. The standard Prusa Slic3r software supports the MMU2S upgrade with its various wipe features. To save on filament and time, you can choose to either wipe excess filament into the infill, into an object, or simply have a Smart Wipe Tower. This allows for a clean changeover from one filament to another while minimizing filament waste. One only needs to look at Prusa’s showcase of prints made using their MMU2S upgrade to realize the potential of this add-on. It requires a step-up in terms of technical skill to fully utilize its potential, but this is an upgrade worth considering for anyone who has spent time with their Prusa i3 printers. 4. Original Prusa SL1 Price: $1399 (kit), $1699 (assembled) Launch date: Early 2019 IDEAL FOR: Professional and commercial users Prusa has managed to build a pretty solid reputation with their FDM printers, so it really was only a matter of time before they delved into SLA printing. The SL1 represents their initial effort and was only made possible by acquiring Futur3D, a company with five years of experience with the technology. Overall, the SL1 was great for an initial product but isn’t quite there yet compared to more developed SLA printers. The Prusa SL1 strives to be a cut above the budget SLA printers but still at a relatively affordable price. The premium feel is apparent in the SL1’s build quality and a well-thought-out interface that features one of the first Prusa printers to come with an LCD interface. If you order the kit version of the Prusa SL1, then be prepared to spend the better part of the next one or two days to put it together. There is a whole array of panels, circuit boards, and wires to assemble which fortunately is made easier by the detailed instructions written up by Prusa. This makes it sound a little more complex than it actually is – it’s not terribly technical, just time-consuming. More specifically, the Prusa SL1 is an MSLA, or masked SLA, 3D printer. What this means is that the SL1 shines UV light through a mask to cure an entire layer of photosensitive resin simultaneously. This is in contrast with traditional SLA printers that use a beam to cure the resin one point at a time. Using the 5.5-inch 2K LED screen, the Prusa SLI1 improves on the throughput of a traditional SLA 3D printer. Another characteristic that makes the Prusa SL1 unique from other SLA printers is the way that the resin vat tilts ever so slightly once a layer has been completed. This reduces the vertical force needed to separate the finished print from the bottom of the resin tank. For reference, the Prusa SL1 is a bottom-up printer with a transparent build plate that moves up as the print progresses. In terms of print quality, the Prusa SL1 performs as excellently as just about any high-quality SLA printer. It can reproduce details at a much finer level and produces prints with layer lines that are barely visible. The 405-nm wavelength of the SL1’s UV light made it compatible with a wide selection of third-party photopolymer resins, although you may have to play around with exposure time settings. The Prusa SL1 also comes with the signature Pruca Slic3r software, which has been updated for SLA slicing. The software is fairly easy to use has been updated and improved since the initial launch of the Prusa SL1. Prusa also sells the Original Prusa Curing and Washing Machine (CW1) as an add-on for the SL1. This is an all-around processing tool fo SLA prints. The machine has functions for washing of finished prints with isopropyl alcohol, drying, and post-curing UV exposure. This is a great accessory for eliminating the mess and hazard of handling the mixture of isopropyl alcohol and uncured resin. The Original Prusa SL1 is a great option for those who are into commercial 3D printing and need a higher level of detail than what FDM technology can provide. Although there are other SLA printers that are much more expensive, the Prusa SL1 is certainly not cheap – especially if you pair it with the Prusa CW1 post-processing machine. What we know for sure is that Prusa is a stickler for innovation and that we probably have not seen their last stab at SLA printing. Final thoughts The Prusa has managed to maintain a solid reputation in the world of 3D printing by continuously coming up with more and more innovative features for 3D printers. Aside from the fact that the printers are open-source, the company itself takes pride in being cognizant of the needs of their users. This community-driven approach to product development has propelled the Prusa brand to heights that have made them virtually unequaled. It’s hardly surprising that their products routinely win awards and get declared the best 3D printer of the year, every year. The post A Detailed Guide to the Prusa 3D Printers appeared first on 3D Insider. View the full article
  7. 2 points
    valchanov

    rabbit bones

    There are good animal CT scans on Duke University's repository. There are also a lot of stl models, tif's and all kind of media content you can possibly want. Just don't forget to quote them, this is an intellectual property... OR you can make a CT scan of a rabbit and segment it into a 3D model by yourself or you can hire one of us to do it. THEN the intellectual rights will be yours. If you want just to download a rabbit skeleton and to 3d print it, go for the Duke University. I am really excited by their Ape and Hominin collection - already 3d printed few of them. The dinosaurs are also really good.
  8. 2 points

    Version 1.0.0

    50 downloads

    skull, anthropology, sex, estimation, male, female orbit, mandible, maxilla, angle, ramus, coronoid, conduct, inner, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital, mastoid, process, foramen, foramina, incisor, molar, premolar, canine, teeth, tooth, dental, dentistry, head, zygomatic, arch, Compare traits between male and female skulls as described in: https://www.morphopasse.com/uploads/8/4/0/8/8408493/klales_nij_database_manual_v1_03.29.19_on_website.pdf. Models were generated from TCIA Head and Neck Cetuximab collection (0522c0251 (top) and 0522c0476 (bottom)), originally under National Institute of Justice grant #2014-DN-BX-K005. Vertebrae were removed during segmentation for access to inferior landmarks, so occipital condyles may be flattened. Models are arranged so they can be combined into one viewing space for comparison as shown--import both into Meshlab or 3D Slicer for further visualizations and/or measurements. Sketchfab viewer available here: https://skfb.ly/6UDFQ and can be embedded into Learning Management Systems.

    Free

  9. 2 points
    Dr. Mike

    2-Factor Authentication

    To enhance security on the site, 2-factor authentication is now available. It is recommended that you enable 2FA to reduce the risk that your account could be compromised. Currently, there are two methods available - the Google Authenticator phone app and security questions. Google Authenticator is the easiest and more secure option. To enable 2FA with Google Authenticator do the following: 1) Log into your embodi3d.com account 2) Go to your account settings by clicking on your username at the top right and choosing Account Settings 3) Go to the Account Security menu and choose to Enable Google Authenticator. If you don't yet have Google Authenticator on your mobile phone, you can download it from the Google Play or Apple Iphone store. It is free. 4) You will then be shown a scannable QR code (blurred in the picture below). Scan this using the Google Authenticator app on your phone. IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT YOU PRINT OUR THE QR CODE SCREEN AT THIS POINT AND KEEP THE PRINTOUT IN A SAFE AND SECURE PLACE. IF YOUR PHONE IS EVER LOST OR STOLEN, YOU CAN USE THE PRINTOUT TO RECONFIGURE GOOGLE AUTHENTICATOR ON A NEW REPLACEMENT PHONE. The google authenticator app will display a 6 digit code that changes every 20 seconds or so. Type in the current code to confirm that your phone is set up properly. That is it! Now you have 2FA on your account and greatly enhanced security!
  10. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    184 downloads

    This is an 1:1 Internal carotid arteries model that reconstructed based on CT images and medical research documents, as the model shows, the part which be reconstructed are C1 to C7 and M1 to M2, with accurate gradient exterior and interior diameter. internal, carotid, artery, ica, base, skull, .stl, 3d, model, printable, vascular, carotid, cervical, petrous, cavernous, supraclinoid, M1, M2, middle, cerebral, artery, mca, head, bone, ridge, foramina, foramen, frontal, temporal, clinoid, apophysis, cranial, fossa, anterior, posterior, clivus, magnum, zygomatic, arch, incisor, molar, premolar, canine, teeth, tooth, maxillofacial, orbit, nasal, lacrimonasal, paranasal, sinuses, sphenoid, ethmoid, lower, turbinates, hard, palate, Items:Half Skull(Left and Right), ICA(Left and Right) Scale: (1:1)

    Free

  11. 1 point
    Jesús Báez

    cSpine

    Version 1.0.0

    2 downloads

    7 vertebrae c1 to c7 individually segmented. my best wishes. bye Anterior arch of the atlas, Base of the skull, Odontoid process, Posterior arch of the atlas, Spinous process, Body of the axis, Anterior superior margin of the vertebra, Transverse process, Anterior inferior margin of the vertebra, 3D model, stl, bone, atlas, axis, cervical, spine

    Free

  12. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    Canine Hip_2 - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Proximal third of the femur, Middle third of the femur, Distal third of the femur, Proximal third of the lower leg, Medial third of the lower leg, Distal third of the lower leg, Joint space of the hip Pubic bone, Femoral head, Greater trochanter, Obturator foramen, Ischium, Ischial tuberosity, Femur, Medial and lateral femoral, condyles, Anterior superior iliac spine, Anterior inferior iliac spine, Roof of the acetabulum, Acetabular convexity (promontory), Spine of the ischium, Anterior acetabular rim, Floor of the acetabulum, Posterior acetabular rim, Femoral head, Greater trochanter, Femoral neck, Superior pubic ramus, Intertrochanteric crest, Obturator foramen, Ischial tuberosity, Lesser trochanter, 3d, model, printable, .stl, hind limb , bone, dog, animal, veterinary,

    Free

  13. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    5 downloads

    My tutorial CT CAP - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Superior angle of the scapula, Acromioclavicular joint, Acromion, Spine of the scapula, Clavicle, Glenoid fossa (articular surface), Glenoid process of the scapula, Medial margin of the scapula, Proximal clavicle, Lateral margin of the scapula, Humerus, 3d, model, .stl, printable, bone, ribs

    Free

  14. 1 point
    Hi, Please check links below, and message me if interested. Best wishes https://v.creators3d.com/index.html?load=%2Fviews%2Fproduction%2Fitem%2F20201114%2F1078667186261940%2F1078667186261940.glb&autorotate=true&json-data=1605351883283&decrypt=1&webp=1&gzip=true&exp=5 https://v.creators3d.com/index.html?load=%2Fviews%2Fproduction%2Fitem%2F20201114%2F2891335094102853%2F2891335094102853.glb&autorotate=true&json-data=1605351743731&decrypt=1&webp=1&gzip=true&exp=2.23
  15. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    24 downloads

    This two piece hollow heart model is derived from a high quality CT scan. The two halves can be kept separate to illustrate anatomy inside the heart, or they can be fused together to make a single piece realistic hollow heart. The cut plane is along the long axis of the heart, which allows for a perfect four-chamber view of the heart. Right and left ventricles, right and left atrium, SVC, IVC, pulmonary arteries and pulmonary veins are present in the model. I printed this model in Formlabs elastic and fused the two models together to make a single hollow heart model for device testing. Below are some pictures from that project. Other heart models I have made:

    $19.99

  16. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    11 downloads

    whole spine (stl) - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Anterior arch of the atlas, Base of the skull, Odontoid process, Posterior arch of the atlas, Spinous process, Body of the axis, Anterior superior margin of the vertebra, Transverse process, Anterior inferior margin of the vertebra, 3D model, stl, bone, atlas, axis, cervical, spine, Body of vertebra, Superior vertebral end plate, Inferior vertebral end plate, Intervertebral disk space, Facet joint, Superior articular process, Inferior articular process, Transverse process, Spinous process, Pedicle, Sacroiliac joint, Sacrum, Sacral foramina,

    Free

  17. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    This is a trigonocephaly case of a 1year old child, ct, scan, without, contrast, .stl, 3d, model, axial, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital, ethmoid, cells, nasal, septum, lower, turbinate, petrous, ridge, cerebellum, paranasal, sinuses, maxillary, sinus, sphenoid, orbit, mastoid, clinoid, apophysis, optic, nerve

    $3.00

  18. 1 point
    Selami

    full mouth

    Version 1.0.0

    112 downloads

    Full Mouth segmented from data set published by UnitedDental. Maxilary and Mandibule seperated both teeth in STL file. Data Set link below. CBCT of mandible, axial, dicom, .stl, 3d, model, printable, printing, medical, medicine, incisor, molar, premolar, canine, teeth, tooth, dental, dentistry, bone, enamel, hard, palate, foramen, foramina, angle, ramus, body, mandible, maxilla, ct, scan, without, contrast,

    Free

  19. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    2 downloads

    Skull Trigonocephaly Case - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. canine, teeth, tooth, angle, ramus, body, 3D, model, .stl, bone, printable, nasal, septum, zygomatic, arch, maxilla, apophysis, mastoid, temporal, frontal, upper, teeth, orbit, mandible, head, skull occipital, parietal, incisor, molar, premolar,

    Free

  20. 1 point
    tsehrhardt

    NA-MIC Project Week--3D Slicer

    Project Week for 3D Slicer: https://projectweek.na-mic.org/PW34_2020_Virtual/ Today is essentially live discourse. Terrie
  21. 1 point
    lukashofstetter

    Skull CT Scan

    Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    head, neck, axial, stl, dicom, 3dmodel, print, brain, lobules, Frontal sinus, Frontal bone, Falx cerebri, Orbital gyri, Straight gyrus, Anterior cerebral artery, Anterior communicating artery, Internal carotid artery, Superior temporal gyrus, Middle temporal gyrus, Middle cerebral artery, Posterior communicating artery, Optic chiasm, Amygdaloid body, Pituitary stalk, Lateral ventricle (temporal horn), Dorsum sellae, Hippocampus, Pentagon of basal cisterns, Inferior temporal gyrus, Posterior cerebral artery, Parahippocampal gyrus, Tentorium cerebelli, Basilar artery and basal sulcus, Pons, Sigmoid sinus, Cerebellar peduncle (middle), Fourth ventricle, Dentate nucleus, vermis of cerebellum (superior part), Temporal bone, Confluence of the sinuses, Cerebellar hemisphere, Transverse sinus, Occipital bone, thyroid, gland, carotid, yugular, maxilla, maxillary, sinus, hard, palate, nasopharynx, nasal septum, lower turbinates, mandible,

    $15.00

  22. 1 point
    Doctys

    dental CT test

    Version 1.0.0

    7 downloads

    test of a CT scan to check the result .STL, CBCT, CT, without contrast, bone, 3d, model, lower, jaw, teeth, dental, dentistry, angle, body, nasal septum, ramus, coronoid, process, maxillofacial, printable, maxilla, upper teeth, teeth, lower teeth, coronoid process, sinus, hard palate

    Free

  23. 1 point
    - Is it typically a requirement to have latticed internal volumes to reduce material costs? In my experience, the model have to be solid and without internal meshes. The material cost can be controlled with the percentage and the type of the infill. - What about dowels/pins so that the model can be assembled? Do people usually want this? If you're printing a bone model in two parts, its better to glue them together after the print. If you're printing a model with a important cavity (skull or aorta), pins or sockets for neodymium magnets are a choice, which guarantees good alignment for the parts of the model and increases usability. The magnets are better, unless your client specifically prefer pins. - Are there any other considerations that would make these models more valuable to the community - I potentially have a few more anatomies that could be of value. Make them shinier, more stable and design a stand for the model.
  24. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    35 downloads

    tcmd pelvis and L-spine, lumbar, spine, atlas, axis, bone, body, intervertebral, disc, foramen, foramina, .stl, 3d, model, printable, printing, medical, medicine, iliac, ischium, pubis, hip, head, femur, sacrum, sacroiliac, joint, lordosis,

    Free

  25. 1 point
    I actually think the pandemic will accelerate 3D printing ... this is one of those opportunities where the technology and hardware lends itself to more DIY / work from home work.
  26. 1 point
  27. 1 point
    elissaios

    eliss1

    Version 1.0.0

    16 downloads

    ct scan, without, contrast, .stl, brain, cerebellum, angle, ramus, bone, pharynx, axial, dicom, head, skull, atlas, axis, cervical, spine, transverse, spinous, process, intervertebral, disc, incisor, molar, premolar, canine, teeth, tooth, dental, dentistry, muscle, tongue, maxillofacial, coronoid, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital,

    Free

  28. 1 point
    fekim90

    Lung CT

    Version 1.0.0

    66 downloads

    Lung Ct scan, lung, ct, scan, without, contrast, axial, dicom .stl, 3d, model, printable, printing, ribs, thorax, chest, sternum, trachea, esophagus, ventricle, auricle, septum, dorsal, intervertebral, disc, bone, transverse, spinous, process, medulla, mediastinum, bronchi, diaphragm, muscle,

    Free

  29. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    31 downloads

    Skull fracture - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. head, skull, .stl, 3d, model, printable, printing, medical, medicine, orbit, nasal, maxilla, mandible, angle, ramus, bone, zygomatic, arch, angle, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital, incisor, molar, premolar, canine, teeth, tooth, dental, dentistry, mastoid, process, orbit, left, fracture,

    Free

  30. 1 point
    Hi David, don't use this shading reconstruction for segmentation. You have to scan desired volume (baby face) and then that volume you have save as uncompresed DICOM data if I recall (you will have several choices from drop down menu, and you can try to save as raw dicom data, compresed dicom data, too... and give it a try and open it in 3D Slicer).. Hope this helps a little bit, I didn't do that for 3 years now and I have forgot all the exact steps how to properly save data in GE US for segmentation.
  31. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    7 downloads

    NH1006 - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. head, neck, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital, eyelid, orbit, nasal, chest, pectoralis, shoulder, upper, limb, skin, ear,

    Free

  32. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    The following model show the steps of a carotid artery stenting procedure. The model represents the following components: the artery bodies, the plaque build up, the stent ,the catheter, net and balloon plus a stand . Size: 225x70x40mm for each one of the arteries. To be sacaled as you wish. The model is provided in 2 version ' a single body with all the parts for each artery ' and 'fractionated component version with all the parts' To be used for educational purposes and 3d printing applications. Ideal for use in medical teaching environments. Perfect for FDM, SLA and DLP printing. The model has been simplified and optimized for 3d printing. Please contact us for any inquiries and modifications

    $20.00

  33. 1 point

    252 downloads

    This anatomically accurate mandible bone (jawbone) was created by Dr. Marco Vettorello, who has graciously given permission to share it here. The mandible forms the lower jaw. It is connected to the rest of skull at the temporomandibular joint. The file is in STL format and compressed with ZIP. This file is also available here. jaw, mandible, jaw, bone, 3d, printing, angle, ramus, coronoid, process, .stl, 3d, model, printable, printing, medicine, medical, incisor, molar, premolar, canine, teeth, tooth, dental, dentistry, foramina, bone,

    Free

  34. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    19 downloads

    Angio TCMD Contrast Agent: Ultravist 300 ct, scan, without, contrast, .stl, 3d, model, printable, printing, medical, ventricle, septum, auricle, mediastinum, ribs, chest, thorax, bone, sternum, scapula, clavicle, upper, humerus, diaphysis, epiphysis, system, bronchi, lung, muscle, aorta, descendent, ascendent, vascular, axial, dicom, coronary, vessels, heart,

    Free

  35. 1 point
    samuelholly

    head_ct

    Version 1.0.0

    6 downloads

    CT scan of the head, head, ct, angiography, frontal, .stl, temporal, parietal, occipital, ventricle, third, fourth, angle, ramus, body, intervertebral, disc, bone, axis, cervical, atlas, dens, transverse, spinous, process, internal, carotid, external, 3d, model, printable, printing, medical, medicine, trachea, larynx, pharynx, zygomatic, arch, maxilla, upper, lower, teeth, mandible, orbit, nasal, ethmoid, cells, maxillary, sinus, petrous, ridge, foramina, foramen, base, skull, clivus, lung, mediastinum, cardiac, chest, thorax, epiphysis, diaphysis, dorsal, sternum, portal, venous, arteries,

    Free

  36. 1 point
    You don't need to create separate DICOM files for the skull and mandible. Depending on the overlap of the teeth, you can erase some of the segmentation in order to create gaps between the skull and mandible--if you are segmenting yourself. If you are uploading to democratiz3d, you can download the model and then either apply a plane cut in Meshmixer or if you want the actual articulations, you can "paint" the parts of the model to delete to create the necessary gaps, then repair the holes. Again, the difficulty would depend on whether you can separate the teeth on the maxilla from the mandible.
  37. 1 point
    Excelent segmentation on the tree structure and very detailed model! Thanks for sharing! I printed it in green TPU 95A and liked the result. Here are a couple of pictures. This will be used for education purposes.
  38. 1 point
    fsuntaxi

    Pelvis Fracture

    Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    Pelvic Fracture with a transverse acetabular fracture. Obtained from 3D CT Scan. Manually Segmented acetabular, acetabulum, fractures, hip, bone, pelvis, fracture, 3d, print, iliac, pelvis, medical, medicine, .stl, 3d, model, printable, bone, hip, fossa, convexity, obturator, spine, anterosuperior, posterosuperior,

    $10.00

  39. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    8 downloads

    its a muscle, horse muscle, very good. A horse leg, tibia, .stl, 3d, model, printable, fibula, leg, horse, muscle, tendons, proximal, distal, patella, knee, axial, dicom, ct, scan, without, contrast,

    Free

  40. 1 point
    I agree with the Prusa Mk3S for most reliable FDM printer. Currently you can get it assembled for $999 or as a kit for $749. Link here. The quality is great and so far it is very reliable. It has an Multi Material Unit which promises to allow multicolor prints and that is definitely LESS reliable as I am still struggling with that. But for single colors, it is very stable. Regarding the Ultimaker I did a review on it and had a lot of problems with complex organic shapes needed for medical 3D printing. I had some catastrophic failures, some of which almost destroyed the printer. See my video review on it below. For STL I agree that the Form 3 is the way to go. Good printer and software and a great material library. I just got a new Form 3B and so far it is great. The optical engine is totally sealed. The Form 2 (which I also have) had an unsealed engine and vapor would deposit on the mirrors after several months of heavy printing requiring a disassembly to clean the mirrors. The Form 3 doesn't have this problem. FYI, if any member of the community is interested in purchasing a Form 3, you can use the code below to get $500 off. When you contact Formlabs sales give them the code to receive your discount. To go to the Form 3 website, click here. Form 3 Discount code: FORM3-JB9CY0 Hope this helps.
  41. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    20 downloads

    Pfote 3 - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. front, leg, bone, veterinary, dog, metacarpal, 3d, model, printable, .stl, phalanx,

    Free

  42. 1 point
    If you want to scan people for fun, you can use your cell phone for photogrammetry with free software. Then you can put the heads on different bodies and to print them. Something like this: For this purpose you can use every 3d printer up to 2000$. I myself prefer my original Prusa MK3, because I'm not an engineer and I prefer something to do all the printing stuff for me. Here is the result: When we're talking about medical 3d printing, we're talking about a whole different topic. The medical models have to be very precise and there is an industrial standards about it. For example, my models have 0,5mm deviation from the original body part at 95% confidence interval. I had a presentation at an morphology symposium about my favorite Lusoria model lately and now I have a lot of orders from the local hospitals, because of the standard, which I can achieve. For medical modeling you have to be an expert in all the morphological specialties (Anatomy, Pathology, Radiology) with some serious clinical background. To reach this level, you need: 1. Medical education. 2. A lot of treated patients, most of which have to stay alive after your job. The death patients are literally skeletons in the closet. 3. Some background in the basic dissection techniques, both the pathological and the anatomical ones. 4. The surgery training is a plus. 5. Some gaming experience or experience with CAD software. The computer games are like bodybuilding for the visual cortex. 6. 1+ years of hard work, everyday modeling, studying, drawing, dissections, consultations with the experts in the field, a lot of tears and some joy. THEN you can do medical modeling, something like this. I started to model, when I was an anatomy assistant professor, with 12 years of experience as an emergency internal physician. I had the chance to find this website with all it resources, tutorials and the awesome support from the administrators and after 1 year of really hard work, I became a professional, (one of the best in my region, in a matter of fact). But still, my biggest nightmare is that, because of my mistakes during the preoperative modeling, a patient will die. So - are we really talking about medical modeling or you just want to do some fun with your client's CT scans?
  43. 1 point
    I am a biomedical engineer, I own a CAD/3D print Company in Croatia. My Company is specialized in production of 3D printed moulds for making patient specific cranial implants out of PMMA. This is a rather cost effective way to produce patient specific cranial impants. I use Solidworks for designing implants and moulds. This software isn´t free, but it's cheaper than Geomagic. The whole procedure is described in an article I have published on my LinkedIn page: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/pmma-cranial-impants-more-cost-effective-solution-josip-rauker/
  44. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    30 downloads

    Hand and wrist rheumatoid arthritis - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. Distal phalanx (tuft), Distal phalanx, Distal interphalangeal joint, Proximal interphalangeal joint, Middle phalanx, Head of the proximal phalanx, Proximal phalanx, Metacarpophalangeal joint, Base of the proximal phalanx, Metacarpal head, Sesamoid, Metacarpal, Metacarpal base, Capitate, Trapezoid, Hamate, Trapezium, Triquetrum, Scaphoid, Pisiform, Radial styloid, Ulnar styloid, Lunate, Distal radius, Distal radioulnar joint Distal ulna, 3d, model, .stl, upper, limb, hand, wrist

    Free

  45. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    37 downloads

    Sonny Tabula Upper cust - stl file processed, teeth, upper, alveolar, superior, maxilla, mandible, lower, incisive, tooth, canine, molar, premolar, dentistry, nasal, This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more.

    Free

  46. 1 point

    1,540 downloads

    Stroke is a disease that affects the arteries leading to and within the brain. It is the number five cause of death and a leading cause of disability in the United States. In 2010, worldwide prevalence of stroke was 33 million, with 16.9 million people having a first stroke. Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability. A stroke occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or ruptures. When that happens, part of the brain cannot get the blood and oxygen it needs, and brain cells die. This 3D printable model of stroke contains three STL files for bioprinting. One STL file is for printing the cerebral arteries. There is a skull STL file and another file for printing the filling inside the skull which provides support for placing the vasculature in the proper position within the model. The files have been zipped to reduce file size. You will need to unzip the files once you have downloaded them.These files are distributed under the Creative Commons license Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs. Please respect the terms of the licensing agreement. The models are provided for distribution on embodi3D.com with the permission of the creators Dr. Beth Ripley and Dr. Tatiana. These models are part of the Top 10 Killers 3D printable disease library. James Weaver and Ahmed Hosny also contributed to the project. We thank everyone involved for their contributions to embodi3d.com and their advocacy for better health and education through 3D printing.

    Free

  47. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    69 downloads

    This model is the right foot and ankle bone rendering of a 65-year-old male with left thigh myxoid fibrosarcoma. At the time of diagnosis, the patient had metastases to his lungs. The patient therefore underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy and was found to have an intermediate grade lesion at the time of diagnosis. The patient unfortunately died 9.5 months after diagnosis. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The ankle is a hinge (or ginglymus) joint made of the distal tibia (tibial plafond, medial and posterior malleoli) superiorly and medially, the distal fibula (lateral malleolus) laterally and the talus inferiorly. Together, these structures form the ankle “mortise”, which refers to the bony arch. Stability is provided by the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), calcaneofibular ligament (CFL), and posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) laterally, and the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments medially. The ankle is one of my most common sites of musculoskeletal injury, including ankle fractures and ankle sprains, due to the ability of the joint to invert and evert. The most common ligament involved in the ATFL. Radiographic analysis of an ankle after injury should include the so-called “mortise view”, upon which measurements can be made to determine congruity of the ankle joint. Normal measurements include >1 mm tibiofibular overlap, </= 4mm medial clear space, and <6 mm of tibiofibular clear space. The talocrural ankle is measured by the bisection of a line through the tibial anatomical axis and another line through the tips of the malleoli. Shortening of the lateral malleolus can lead to an increased talocrural angle. The foot is commonly divided into three segments: hindfoot, midfoot, and forefoot. These sections are divided by the transverse tarsal joint (between the talus and calcaneus proximally and navicular and cuboid distally), and the tarsometatarsal joint (between the cuboids and cuneiforms proximally and the metatarsals distally). The first tarsometatarsal joint (medially) is termed the “Lisfranc” joint, and is the site of the Lisfranc injury seen primarily in athletic injuries. This model was created from the file STS_023.

    Free

  48. 1 point
    Olivier Cros

    Temporal Bone Left

    Hi, I made a 3D print of the mastoid air cell system, I shared a picture of it along this text :-) Great to see I am not the only one working on this fascinating bone :-)
  49. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    761 downloads

    These are the DICOM CT scan files for the instructables tutorial for creating a 3D printable model. Download the zipped folder and unzip it. You will add the entire directory to Slicer to start the process. Also included is the intermediary NRRD file for use with the democratiz3D file conversion service. You must be logged into your free embodi3d account to download. To register, click here.

    Free

  50. 1 point
    Dr. Mike

    Shoulder joint

    From the album: Models

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