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  1. 2 points

    Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    An aneurysm of the abdominal aorta in close proximity to horseshoe kidney. Presurgical model. The operation is ongoing. Honestly, I'm pretty happy with the result (and also the surgical team, which ordered the model). I printed it on Prusa MK3S, the kidney with the veins and the distal parts of the arteries with white Esun PLA, the aorta with red 3dJake Eco PLA, on 0,150mm layer height. The kidney is printed on 30% gyroid infill and 2 perimeters, with support on build plate only plus several support enforcers. The aorta is with 4 perimeters and 100% concentric infill, with support on build plate only and few support blockers. I glued them together with cyanacrylic glue and used a touch of red acrylic paint to make the glued parts more appealing. It took 300 grams of plastic and the printing time was 36 hours because of the kidney. aorta, aneurysm, horseshoe, kidney, presurgical, 3d, printing, celiac, trunk, vessels, mesenteric, superior, inferior, iliac, common, external, internal, abdomen, infrarrenal, organ, vascular, abdominal,

    $25.00

  2. 2 points
    I remember seeing 3D printed skulls from CT scans many years ago at JPAC, the Joint POW MIA Accounting command based at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. It was a pretty cool idea to study the 3D printed models so that the original remains could be buried, thus giving families closure, etc. I think there is great potential in anthropology for this type of technology.
  3. 2 points
    kopachini

    Quality of models

    At my department we have Intellispace Portal 7 and I am quite pleased with it, depending what you want to do with it. The major thing is that there is possibility to export .stl file from volume rendered recons (short VRT) from version 6 or 7 and above, which is not possible from Siemens Syngo. Also we have Philips Azurion C-arm and when you perform rotational intrarterial angiography it is possible to make VRT 3D model and also export it into Intellispace Portal (I did that only once when Philips aplicator was at my department but will have to do it more when I am back after my final exam). Also, I tried version Intellispace 9 or 10 (not sure which one) at RSNA meeting and it looks pretty nice, too. The thing is that all software in workstations have the same algorithms for automated segmentation and generation VRT models that are based on different threshold values for different tissue density and as said before, the best visualized tissues are those that have significant contrast to other tissue (like bone or contrast blood to surrounding soft tissue). Organs like liver, kidneys etc. are composed of different density tissues that have different density voxels on CT scan that can range from higher HU values in one voxel (blood vessel in post contrast scan of liver) to lower HU values (let say small area of lipids accumulated in hepatocytes), and if that area is near liver capsule where adjacent tissue is fat, you will have artefacts in your automated segmentation of liver. That is why I love manual or semi-automated segmentation for now until AI makes automated segementation more accurate (there was post about application of AI and segmentation in 3D slicer in some other topic).
  4. 2 points
    (Many thanks to @Nicola for agreeing to this interview in the Member Spotlight! If you're working on a cool project or you'd like to be featured, send me a quick message!) 1. Hi Dr. Nicola, what's your background? I am an ENT doctor at the hospital of TERAMO in Italy and I am practicing medicine for 20 years. Over many years, I've developed a specialty in ENT pathology and head and neck surgery. I also have two kids and enjoy spending summers by the sea in Roseto Degli Abruzzi, the town where I live on the coast of Adriatic sea in the region of Abruzzo in the center of Italy. The beach by Roseto Degli Abruzzi 2. How did you come across medical 3d printing? It was an accident! I’ve always had a passion for the interpretation of radiological images and the three-dimensional reconstruction of images. I needed to show a patient the cause of his nasal liquorrhea and I first started to make a virtual three-dimensional reconstruction to be viewed on the computer and then I also understood - thanks to the tutorials of Embodi3D- that it was possible to build real models from the data of a CT scan! Medical 3d printing is a growing field in the modern medicine and surgery. It can be useful for the study of anatomy in universities as much as for patient-specific anatomy (such as vascular variants). It is also possible to use it for the study of complex clinical cases such as tumor diseases and for the pre-surgical programming of oncological or complex traumatic diseases. 3. To help out other members, what are some beginner tips on creating a model? I have many models for sale in the Model Library and I've improved them many times. The advice I would like to give to those who start with medical 3d printing is to learn how to use dicom image manipulation softwares like Horos, Slicer, etc. To start exporting small regions of interest to .stl files and to play a lot with one of the numerous .stl file manipulation softwares. 4. What's on your bookshelf? One of my side pleasures is the playing guitar and also reading. My current book is Stephen Hawking’s Brief Answers to the Big Questions. 5. If someone were to come visit you, where would you take them on a tour? I live in Abruzzo, a region relatively unknown to tourists but it is certainly one of the most surprising in Italy. One of the most interesting aspects is the great proximity between the sea, the hills and the mountains which make it the green region of Europe. Tourists can enjoy spending a morning at the beach, going to eat in one of the beautiful cities and then trekking in the mountains in the afternoon. A region full of ancient villages, fortresses, unspoiled nature and then the passion for traditions and for good food. Finally, Abruzzo is the land of large vineyards and excellent wines.
  5. 2 points
    Thanks for being a great member Nicola! If you want to see some of the terrific files Nicola has shared, click here.
  6. 2 points
    Hello For a limited budged - Ender 3. Several of my colleagues and some students purchased such machines. An amazing printing right from the box. For minimum troubles and great beginner experience - Prusa MK3S. It's declared "the best 3d printer of 2019" for a reason. Fantastic learning curve and results. The new Prusa Mini also looks quite formidable. Those are machines with automatic features, which are quite useful. For professional settings - Ultimaker. It doesn't matter what kind of task you're trowing at it, it works and works and works. The minimum professional level machine. DLP for limited budget - Anycubic Photon or Elegoo Mars. They cheap, dirty and reliable. They requires an exposure to chemicals, but the printing is fantastic. STL - Form 3. The best in it's class. Because of it release, you can also purchase brand new Form 2 for 2k$, which was the best in it's class last year... There are also the 3D systems, Stratasys and similar corporations, but it's a whole different world there - the machines are fantastic. costs thousands of thousands and provides a quality, which is impossible for the low class, for which you're asking.
  7. 1 point
    Wow, that is pretty cool! Thanks for sharing!
  8. 1 point
    Yes definitely! I would definitely like to see it applied more to unidentified remains.
  9. 1 point
    Do any of you print 3d models to sell? This is a good article to keep in mind. ==== If you’re running a 3D printing service, or a product development company where you’re quoting customers on digital fabrication services, there’s a good chance that you’re pricing wrong. Here’s how I know. In the last five years, I’ve spoken to hundreds of 3D printing/Additive Manufacturing business owners about how they price their services and a vast majority of them undersell their services. The three primary reasons are either a combination or one of the following: They don’t take into account all of the ancillary components that go into running a business. They charge purely based on the volume of the CAD model not taking into account exponential price increases or decreases. Taking their slicer output of time to print and material usage too literal without physically measuring those parameters and taking into account #1 above. Based on those hundreds of hours of conversation combined with years of industry experience, I’ve developed a holistic methodology on how to price for 3D printed parts and projects that accounts for all aspects of the business (human/machine time, machine depreciation, software, facility cost) the size of the job, and the unique attributes of the parts. I’ll share that methodology with you today, but first, a little more context on how I got here. Mike Moceri, the founder and CEO of MakerOS. Back in 2013, while I was running a 3D printing service bureau, my team and I received an order from a Fortune 500 company to print them approximately 15,000 individual parts for a toy line. At the time, we were charging a little less than $1 per cubic centimeter printing in PLA and Nylon PA12, and that’s how we ended up pricing them for the job. The project ended up being a very challenging one (that’s a whole different story that you should ask me about at some point) and after some time gaining more experience over the years, I realized that, considering how immensely large the job was, we should have priced about 70% more than what we originally quoted. There’s a lot we didn’t factor for: the manual time it takes to prep, slice, validate, think through how to plate up and pull off parts; the software costs to execute all of those tasks; how long it actually took to print parts accounting for machine depreciation. It was quite a learning experience – in fact, it ultimately changed my life because I decided to do something about it, and I’m still doing it today. View the full article
  10. 1 point
    Candace Moore

    Quality of models

    Not all the algorithms are based on different threshold values. I don't mean to get super-technical, but I am a somewhat skilled programmer for a very limited number of things. It's a super-simple algorithm to simply put a threshold on HU. There are a bunch of other approaches algorithmically. You can also threshold based on texture analyses even in 3D slicer. I could go on here for ten paragraphs, but trust me there are a lot. AI based segmentation that is pretty accurate is available for some things...but the ones I have seen were custom built by companies for a particular entity looking to segment something specific e.g. just segment out the lungs into bronchopulmonary segments.
  11. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    Full size adult human brain, segmented from CT scan, including cerebellum and start of brain stem. brain, nervous, system, brain, 3d, medical, printing, human, brain, cerebellum, brainstem,

    $7.00

  12. 1 point
    mmkaiser

    Anatomical heart box

    This print worked well. Really liked the addition of the stand and the holes for the magnets.
  13. 1 point
    Tonia

    Ribs_right

    Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    Right side of the chest wall, including half of the spine, and right ribs 1-12, ribs, chest, wall, thorax, spine, chest, ribcage, cage, dorsal, body, 3d, model, printable,

    $9.90

  14. 1 point
    Accidents are very unfortunate. Such an unfortunate incident happened with 14 yr old, Aaska Shah on 3rd Dec 2019. She fractured her left hand’s elbow while playing. The x-ray scan shows multiple fractures which made the case quite complicated. The news of fracturing her elbow so badly left her parents devastated. At this young age, planting a prosthetic implant would have compromised the natural movement and ability of the patient. So, the doctors were left with the only option to operate the patient and keep the bone pieces in place by clamps. After being denied by several hospitals who thought that an operation would be too difficult and dangerous, Aaska’s parents brought their daughter to the Surat’s well known Dr Jignesh Pandya. Read the full article here: https://www.amchronicle.com/news/3d-printing-helps-in-complex-orthopaedic-surgeries/ Thank you to embodi3D member @Agam Shah for sharing this great story with us!
  15. 1 point
    Tonia

    Full Intestine

    Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    Small intestine, colon, rectum and appendix - all connected , intestine, small, bowel, ileum, colon, ascendent, descendent, sigmoid, rectum appendix,

    $7.00

  16. 1 point
    Candace Moore

    Quality of models

    I use 3D slicer at home, but I was in a course where Philips Intellispace was taught. Both have advantages and disadvantages. I'm sure the Intellispace costs differently depending upon how it is negotiated. If you want I can send you my contact there who might know what kind of deal was negotiated for my course. These things are inherently local although the company a big multi-national. I currently live in Israel, and still had to route all my questions through that contact in Spain where the course came from, as Philips here is different. The versions of Intellispace are even slightly different depending on your region. You live in the USA, and they are sort of hyper-capitalists over there. If I were you I might try to negotiate with Europe, and claim your site is intended to be a global resource.
  17. 1 point
    Something fun for the week: A method for printing 3D objects that can control living organisms in predictable ways has been developed by an interdisciplinary team of researchers ... The above text was printed from an external website. View the full article
  18. 1 point
    Surprisingly little work has been done on automating prints in 3D print clusters. Generally, there hasn't also been much truly innovative work done ... The above text was printed from an external website. View the full article
  19. 1 point
    Dr. Mike

    JC 2.2 - stl file processed

    We printed this model at half size in white resin using stereolithography and it turned out great!
  20. 1 point

    Version 2.1

    33 downloads

    JC 2.2 - stl file processed scoliosis, severe, bone, 3d model, stl, ribs, scapula, clavicle, lumbar, spine, dorsal, pelvis, hip, sacrum, printable This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more.

    Free

  21. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    8 downloads

    Macaqe_M_head - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. head, .stl, 3d, model, printable, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital, zygomatic, foramina, arch, temporomandibular, joint, angle, ramus, coronoid, process, bone, jaw, upper, lower, teeth, tooth, dental, maxillofacial, animal, monkey, veterinary,

    Free

  22. 1 point
    Allen

    Quality of models

    Hi @Candace Moore Thanks for being a member of our community There are definitely some high quality free files, but you'll need to search around more. Are there some specific models that you were looking for, and for what quality? Here's a list of the top 20 downloaded files that you can browse. Many are free.
  23. 1 point
    Angel Sosa

    Models to teach pedriatic anatomy

    Hello Hector, welcome to Embodi3d. Meanwhile you can check this website: https://wiki.cancerimagingarchive.net/display/NBIA/Downloading+Images+Using+the+NBIA+Data+Retriever You can download the app to download the volumes of the tomographs and then enter them in the tool of our website to create the 3d models. Downloading Images Using the NBIA Data Retriever When you download images you have added to your cart, TCIA provides a list of these images in a manifest file (manifest-xxx.tcia). You must have already installed the NBIA Data Retriever to open this manifest file and download the images. You can share the manifest file with collaborators, so that they can download the same images that you have added to your cart. Collaborators must also install the NBIA Data Retriever to open the manifest file. If you want to share a manifest file that includes links to private image collections, you must first manually install the latest NBIA Data Retriever. The latest version of the NBIA Data Retriever controls access to private collections. In addition, your collaborators must have the same access to those private collections as you do. Otherwise, your collaborators will not be able to download images from those collections. I hope this helps to get started. Angel S.
  24. 1 point
    WFlapper

    Metopic Synostosis

    Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    Premature fusion of the metopic suture in the skull causing a characteristic abnormal head shape, craniosynostosis, congenital, .stl, skull, paediatric, child, deformity, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital, .stl, 3d, model, printable, orbit, foramina, nasal, spine, angle, ramus, body, mastoid, process, metopic, sutures, head,

    $30.00

  25. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    Cervical Spine C1-C5 was designed from MRI scanning. All parts are separated, that can be printed easier. High quality of STL file provide good adjustment between all elements of cervical spine during assembly. neck, spine, cervical, C1, C2, C3, C4, C5, bone, body, parts, anterior, posterior, transverse, cervical, spine, .stl, 3d, model, printable,

    $5.90

  26. 1 point
    After several weeks of multi color/material printing with my FDM printer Prusa MK3 (I have other Printers too) with the Multi Material Unit 2 (MMU2) I'd like to share my results with you. Another interesting product regarding multimaterial is the Mosaic Palette 2. I don't own that unit at the moment but I know people who are using the system and I talked a lot with them about the unit so I will share their experience also with you. First of all, some general info. The Prusa MK3 costs as a build kit 769€ and fully assembled 999€. The MMU2 unit comes only as a kit and costs 300€. It can print with up to 5 materials. It can only be used with a Prusa printer out of the box. (Firmware is open source so in theory you could tinker it to work with other printers). Prusa has also their own (open source) slicer called Slic3er PE. The Palette 2 comes in two versions, the standard and the pro. Both versions can print with up to 4 materials. I highly recommend the pro version because it has a better warranty and comes with better quality parts. I also recommend the canvas hub option because it makes it easier to connect the system to your printer. That would result in a total prise of 878 USD. The Palette 3 can only be used with 3D printers that use 1.75 mm filament. So it can't be used with something like an Ultimaker. One more thing about filament. Prusa has now their own filament called Prusament. It is produced with a tolerance of +/- 0.02 mm in diameter. And you get a QR code with your spool to check the measuring yourself. Every spool is measured 100%. One (and only) advantage of the 2.85 mm filament that Ultimaker is using is that it is easier to produce precisely. If you are using 1.75 mm with +/- 0.02 mm that advantage is gone. First some thoughts on the MMU2. The MK3 produces very nice quality prints especially with high quality PLA like Prusament or PLA/PHA. That is mainly thanks to the Bondtech direct drive extruder. One other nice feature is the removable (magnetic flex steel) PEI bed. I guarantee you that if you are using this feature one time you will never never ever want a printer without it again. The basic principle of the system is that it adds a bowden system with a selector to the direct drive system. So the direct drive system pulls the filament up until the bowden system takes over. Than it switches the filament and the bowden system pushes the filament back to the direct drive gears. And so on ... As already mentioned it comes as a kit. And that is a BIG problem. Assembling it is not easy because you have to make sure that the filament path is as smoothly as possible. When you pull filament out from the hotend you can have tips with large strings or increased diameters. That will cause problems. To form the tips Slic3r PE has something called "ramming sequence". It tries to "form" the tips nicely like with no strings. This works good with Prusas own filament Prusament. It works also usually quite good with other filaments especially high quality ones like PLA/PHA. But there is no guarantee it works with the filament you are using so you might have to try different settings. So you have with the MMU2 basically two main problems. Assembling it so that everything runs perfectly smooth. And getting the ramming sequence settings right. A LOT of people are having problems with that. I had also try a lot out and it was frustrating at the beginning. I have now a working unit and prints are imho amazing. Now some words about the Palette 2 (pro). The principle of the machine is that it cuts the filaments and than splices them (melting) together. So you have one filament going out of the system with the right color combination for your model. It comes basically fully assembled. Installing the system to your printer takes maybe half an hour or so depending on your setup. So a LOT easier that the MMU2. One big problem right now is that their own slicer is very buggy and produces (especially on complex models) mediocre print quality. Sometimes it does even the color changes on the wrong location of the part. Combining your own more sophisticated slicer like Slic3er, Simplify3D or Cura with their system works also not reliably at the moment. Some general thoughts. Both systems produce purge towers. Every time when you change the color you have to get rid of the plastic from the old color in the hot end. How much you have to purge onto the tower is color dependent. E. g. switching from black to white or from PLA to BVOH as extreme scenarios. BUT as I mentioned the Palette splices the filaments together. That produces a color gradient in the filament of a few mm. That has to be purged additionally. So the purge amount of the Palette will always be bigger than the one of the MMU2. Slic3er PE has the option to "purge into infill" so it purges also into the objects infill. That option will come to the Palette 2 in the near future. I print a lot with BVOH and I know that it can work with the Palette too. But in both cases it adds complexity. Slic3er PE has the option for printing only support interface layers or completely supports with soluble material. I will start testing flexible materials in the near future. Customer support is pretty good with both companies. The forums are used very actively and you have also a very helpful chat support at Prusa. MMU2 Print: MMU2 Print: Kidney with tumor and magnet inserts MMU2 Fun prints: Palette slicing problems: Palette color gradient:
  27. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    43 downloads

    STL derived from a CT Lumbar spine and segmented with Slicer3D. lumbar, spine, axial, skeleton, lumbar, spine, .stl, 3d, model, printable, plates, body, intervertebral, disc, spinous, process, transverse, iliac, bone, sacrum, foramina, coccyx, ribs, sacroiliac, joint,

    Free

  28. 1 point
    Angel Sosa

    Converting Ultrasound Files

    Maybe you can learn more about it here: https://3dprintedultrasounds.com/blog/2018/09/10/convert-an-ultrasound-image-to-an-stl/
  29. 1 point

    54 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file of a thoracic spine with severe scoliosis was generated from real CT scan data and is thus anatomically accurate as it comes from a real person. It shows how the vertebrae become misaligned in the scoliotic spine. Great for education at all levels. Download is free for registered members. This file was originally created by Dr. Bruno Gobbato, who has graciously given permission to share it here on Embodi3D. Modifications were made by Dr. Mike to make it suitable for 3D printing. The file(s) are distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license. It can't be used for commercial purposes. If you would like to use it for commercial purposes, please contact the authors. Technical specs: File format: STL Manifold mesh: Yes Triangles: 261682 thoracic, spine, scoliosis, t, spine, .stl, 3d, printable, ribs, .stl, 3d, model, printable, body, transverse, foramen, intervertebral, disc, costovertebral, joint, facet,

    Free

  30. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    4 downloads

    stlbrow1 - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. lumbar, sacrum, tail, 3d, model, bone, veterinary, .stl, hip,pelvis, iliac, sacroiliac, joint, pelvic, foramina, fracture, body, spinous, transverse, k9, dog, obturator, foramen,

    Free

  31. 1 point
    Ted365

    Head CT normal dose vs low-dose

    Hi all, I have a patient who needs to take a very fine CT (1mm slices) prior to surgery for the manufacture of a cranial implant. The equivalent dose for this scan is approximately 10mSv. If the patient were to have this scan done at low dose - 30 to 50% of the regular dose, would the CT scan be acceptably accurate for the implant maufacture? I have found materials detailing how detection rate of tumors and other malignancies in soft tissues using low-dose is similar to that of normal does. In this case, since we are interested in just the shape, the contour of the bone, is low-dose a good solution? Thank you very much, Ted
  32. 1 point
    This is the second in a series of articles about skull models created from CT scan data and designed to provide a low-cost means of anatomy teaching. To see my past article about the skull base model, click here. Learning detailed anatomy is a grueling process that doctors, nurses, and other health science students must go through. Traditionally, learning anatomy involved detailed study of textbooks, but learning 3D structures from 2D pages just doesn't work well. Dissecting cadavers is the traditional means of teaching doctors, but this process is tedious, messy, very expensive, and only available in select educational institutions (i.e. med schools). Most students of anatomy do not have access to these resources. 3D printing is putting the power of real 3D anatomy within reach of ordinary students at very low cost. These models are created from highly detailed CT scan data from real human bodies, not an artist's conceptualization. This half skull and cervical spine has been cut along median sagittal plane. This clearly shows the external bony anatomy (zygomatic arch, orbit, etc.) as well as intracranial anatomy (skull base formina, paranasal sinuses, etc.). Bony details of the cervical spine are also clearly shown. You can 3D print your own model by downloading the free files. These files are available on this website in STL or COLLADA format, in full size and half-size versions. You can get them here: full size (STL, COLLADA), half-size (STL, COLLADA). Check out more downloadable files in the File Vault. If you would rather have a high quality model made for you, you can buy one from Shapeways here (full-size, half-size). Feel free to modify the files as you would like, just please don't use them for commercial purposes. If you create something cool, please give back to the community by sharing it on the Embodi3d website in the File Vault. For updates on news and new blog entries, follow us on Twitter at @Embodi3D
  33. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    7 downloads

    Lung CT Test 2 - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. bone, 3d model, .stl, ribs, scapula, clavicle, heart, chest, thorax, mediastinum, great, vessels, aorta, descendent, ascendent, celiac, trunk, sternum, sternocostoclavicular joint, dorsal, lumbar, ventricle, auricle, spinous, process,

    Free

  34. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    62 downloads

    Mary Skull - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. skull, facial, maxilla, mandible, teeth, head, orbit, nasal, yugular, carotid, vessels, scala, clavicle, sternum, cervical, spine, parietal, temporal, frontal, occipital, mastoid, apophysis, printable

    Free

  35. 1 point
    Dr. Mike

    lace skulls

    From the album: Blog images

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