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  1. 3 points
    valchanov

    Postprocessing 3D prints

    Every Slicer software have automatic support function. Just click it and it will generate the right amount of support you need. For bone models the important question is - are your fellow surgeons planning to cut the model or not. It will be a shame, if they break their instruments into your model... For metal implant premodelling prior the operation, you need smooth bones with high resolution details. In my experience, 0,150mm layer thickness, with 4 perimeters (1,7mm shell thickness with 0,4mm nozzle), 15% gyroid or cuboid infill, a bit colder extrusion temperature (200C for PLA) is perfect. Your fellow surgeons can bend the metalic osteosynthesis implants on the model into their optimal shape, can sterilise them and this whole operation will decrease the surgery time with 1 hour. This is a big difference for the outcome of the operation, the recovery time, the complications ect. ect. If you want to print fracture fragments, make them in different colors. Then you can make 3D visualization with the corresponding colors. The model will look marvelous and you'll become the surgeon's best buddy. They will love you, they will cheer you and they will give you a lot of money for that. If you need specific information, please tell us - printer model, slicer software, material on choice. I can give you more specific information, if you do that.
  2. 2 points

    Version 1.0.0

    14 downloads

    This is a preoperative model of thoraco-abdominal aneurysm, Crawford typle I, with rupture above the diaphragm. The subsequent haemorrhagia in the mediastinum closed temporary the rupture, probably saving the life of the patient. This was an impossible operation, which took 7 hours and the team of the best cardio-thoracic surgeons in Bulgaria. I don't know how, but the patient is still alive and kicking. It took me 3 days to make the model and to turn it into a 3d visualization and I'll share my workflow with you. I'm printing the model right now for a cardio-thoracic surgery symposium. The source is Angio CT scan with 1,3 mm slide thickness. 1. I analysed the model in Radiant Dicom viewer (you can activate trial license for unlimited amount of times, if you can't afford 100 euro for it). I selected the best series and exported them in a folder. 2. I loaded the model in 3D Slicer. First, I run two denoising algoritms (Gradient Anisotropic Diffusion and Curvature Anisotropic Diffusion), which improved the quality of the images significantly. Then I selected a ROI, which included the whole aorta. With the Segment Editor Module I segmented the lumen of the aorta. Then, as a separate segmentation, I used the Margin operation to grow the lumen with 2 centimeters and applied a boolean operation, resulting in a hollow shell with precise lumen. I had to segment the rest of the aortic wall manually. I exported the result as STL file. 3. In Meshmixer, I modeled the whole thing, until I was satisfied by the result. 4. My client asked me to remove the aortic arch (it's such a pain, I love aortic arches) and to print the aneurysmal sac with the abdominal aorta and the bifurcation of the iliac arteries. Note the double renal artery. I divided the model into two parts and installed ports for two 8x2mm and two 5x2 mm neodymium magnets with tolerance of 0,250mm. The final preprint version is on picture 3. 5. I'm printing this model with 1,5mm slide thickness, 4 perimeters, 15% gyroid infill, custom support with support enforcers, using red Natural PLA from a local manufacturer. The whole printing will take 45 hours.

    Free

  3. 1 point
    Adam Villarreal

    Btony

    Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    We are trying to convert this to an STL file. If you have issues, can you email adamjvillarreal@gmail.com. Thanks Adam ct, scan, with, contrast, axial, coronal, sagittal, lung, mediastinum, great, vessels, heart, auricle, right, hypertrophy, ventricle, cardiomegaly, dorsal, spine, scapula, clavicle, bone, 3d, model, septum, carotid, subclavian, arteries, diaphragm, bronchi

    Free

  4. 1 point
    embodi3d

    embodi3D 3D Printed Models

    Examples of 3D printed models created by embodi3D
  5. 1 point
    I think this is the biggest thoracic aneurysm I have ever seen. I am glad the patient survived!
  6. 1 point
    valchanov

    Medical 3D printing 101

    This topic is for medical 3d printing tips and tricks for the newbies. I'm starting with the bones, you can add whatever you can share. Bones. The main advantage of the orthopedical presurgical 3d printed models is the possibility to create an accurate model, which can be used for metal osteosynthesis premodelling - the surgeons can prepare (bend, twist, accommodate) the implants prior the operation. After a sterilisation (autoclaving, UV-light, gamma-ray etc etc), those implants can be used in the planned surgery, which will decrease the overall surgery time (in some cases with more than an hour) with all it's advantages, including a dramatic decreasing of the complication rates, the X-ray exposure for the patient and for the surgeons, the cost and the recovery rates etc etc. For this purpose, you need a smooth bone model, with clearly recognizable and realistic landmarks, realistic measurements and physical properties, close to the real bone. Traditionally, the orthopedical surgeons in my institution used polystyrene models, made by hand, now they have access to 3d printed models and they are better in any way. Here are some tips how to print that thing. 1. Method - FDM. The bone models are the easiest and the most forgiving to print. You can make them with literally every printer you can find. FDM is a strong option here and, in my opinion, the best method on choice. 2. Matherial - PLA - it's cheap, it's easy to print, it's the bread and butter for the bone printing. Cool extruding temperature (195-200C) decrease the stringing and increases the details in the models. 3. Layer heigh - 0,150mm. This is the best compromise between the print time, the quality and the usability of the models. 3. Perimeters (shell thickness) - 4 perimeters. One perimeter means one string of 3d printed material. It's width depends on the nozzle diameter and the layer thickness. For Prusa MK3 with 0,4mm nozzle 1 perimeter is ~0,4mm. To achieve a realistic cortical bone, use 4 perimeters (1,7mm). The surgeons loves to cut stuff, including the models, in some cases I have to print several models for training purposes. 4 perimeters PLA feels like a real bone. 4. Infill - 15% 3d infill (gyroid, cuboid or 3d honey comb). The gyroid is the best - it looks and feels like a spongy bone. It's important to provide a realistic tactile sensation for the surgeons, especially the trainees. They have to be able to feel the moment, when they pass the cortical bone and rush into the spongiosa. 5. Color - different colors for every fracture fragment. If the model is combined with a 3D visualization, which colors corresponds with the colors of the 3d print, this will make the premodelling work much easier for the surgeons. Also, it looks professional and appealing. 6. Postprocessing - a little sanding and a touch of a acrylic varnish will make the model much better. 7. Support material - every slicer software can generate support, based on the angle between the building platform and the Z axis of the model. You can control this in details with support blockers and support enforcers, which for the bones is not necessary, but it's crucial for the vessels and the heart. Conclusions - the bone models are easy to make, they look marvelous and can really change the outcome of every orthopedical surgery.
  7. 1 point
    Dan Cardosa

    Postprocessing 3D prints

    Wow, that was an excellent response to my question. I appreciate all the help available here. It's a great site with a great community!
  8. 1 point
    Dr. Mike

    Size of the 3D print vs Actual size

    There shouldn't be. Just know that the unit of measurement is in millimeters. If you import the STL file into printer software and specify that the unit of measurement is cm, inches, or feet, your model will be HUGE. Hope this helps. Mike
  9. 1 point
    Angel Sosa

    Size of the 3D print vs Actual size

    You can check this tutorial https://www.embodi3d.com/democratiz3d-user-manual/#Quality
  10. 1 point
    vennem

    mandible - stl file processed

    I remixed and resized a little and printed well in white pla.
  11. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    40 downloads

    High fidelity 3D models of liver vasculature. Created using the anatomical atlas published by the open anatomy project. liver, portal, vessels, .stl, printable, 3d, model, printable, left portal vein, right anterior portal vein, and right posterior portal vein

    Free

  12. 1 point
    Terrie, Speaking of sharing anthropology files online, embodi3D has a dedicated section in the file library for anthropological files. But, it hasn't been active at all. Do you have any ideas for how we can get better sharing in this field? We'd like to help promote 3D printing in anthropology as well as medicine. https://www.embodi3d.com/files/category/11-anthropology/ Thanks in advance, Dr. Mike
  13. 1 point
    On my last post I gave an overview of the 3D printers I am currently using in our hospital program. Now I will be explaining the different software I have used from one time to another to go from 3D model to 3D print. The software I cover here is available as a free download or for under $500. 1. TinkerCAD: The first software I used was TinkerCAD. It is a web-based CAD design tool, Simply create a free account and start designing. The layout and menu's are simple and basic enough for beginners to naviagate. It offers many pre-made tools to use from adding letters to adding shapes. For creating designs in TinkerCAD it uses a combination of adding and subtracting shapes or using pre-made designs. The main tools I use are Align, Group, Ruler, and Cylinder. When finished you can download your designs for exporting to a 3D printer or use a 3rd party to print your design for you. For being a entry-level software I still use it to add connections between bones, and for simple movement between parts. Importing .stl files is an important function to use when creating files in other software and wanting to edit in TinkerCAD. Use in Healthcare Applications: Adding custom connections between parts, creating simple frames and supports. Pros: Simple design, easy to use, no software to download, free, always available online from any computer. Cons: Pre-loaded shapes can be limiting for complex parts. Amazing results can be achieved with practice and time. 2. 123D Design: This software is part of the Autodesk family. This a free download, geared more towards users with some knowledge of CAD software. Where TinkerCAD requires the user to use shapes to make designs, in 123D you can create from scratch. This software is ideal for designing prototypes and those wanting to becoming more familiar with CAD software. I use 123D when I need more control than what is offered in TinkerCAD. Use in Healthcare Applications: The software provides more customization than TinkerCAD. It allows for custom-made parts used in Rapid Prototyping Design. Pros: Simple to use, free, great for learning CAD software. Cons: Other software is capable of the same functions. 3. Autodesk Fusion360: I recently started using this software. As our 3D printing program grew I started to receive request to design prototypes based on drawings. Fusion360 has been my software of choice when creating prototypes. The software offers many tools from Sculpting, Combining, Importing Mesh, and Press & Pull, to name a few. I can spend countless post just discussing all the features available in Fusion360, best advice is to go use it. The online support is outstanding. Autodesk really has stood behind this product and helping the community, all my questions were answered within hours (during business hours) and customer support always provided screenshots or videos as well as the written steps. Fusion360 also has a new feature that will export directly to the printing software included or a 3rd party software, such as Preform, Simplify3d, Meshmixer, etc. Use in Healthcare Applications: Designing prototypes, creating designs based off of patient scan data, creating a wide range of models from simple to complex, allows for online collaboration with your team. Pros: Many features available, great online/community support, constant updates to software. Cons: Cost associated with purchasing software (minimal) 4. Meshmixer: Another software from the Autodesk family that I use. This is a very powerful & valuable piece of free software to have when 3D printing. Meshmixer gives you control over many different aspects of your model, including Transform, Plane Cut, Sculpt, Analysis, and adding Supports. The Analysis function provides Slicing of your model, it will correct errors and prepare the model for 3D Printing. Meshmixer allows direct exporting to certain printers (*listed in Meshmixer). Using the Support feature allows you to define how supports will be generated. This software also allows you to add or remove supports that are generated by the software, a very useful feature when printing a patient specific model that is dependent on accuracy. Use in Healthcare Applications: This software is a must-have. I use it to double-check for any slicing errors prior to printing. You can also sculpt organic models from scratch (see uterus) Pros: Free. Many editing options available. Will help ensure more successful prints. Cons: Although there are training guides and a community forum. The software can be overwhelming to a first time user. The best recommendation is to search forums and spend time using the software to become familiar with the available features. Conclusion There are many options available when choosing software to use. It is important to evaluate cost, ease of use, available functions, and capability with the 3D printers you will be using. Evaluate the goals of your 3D Printing Program to choose what combination of software you will need and use. Remember as most of the software featured here is free, spend time working with each one. Links to software websites found Here An added extra. Download a 3D Skull ready for Print Click Here Written by David Escobar Check out my site for more information 3DAdvantage.org Twitter: @descobar3d
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