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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/23/2019 in Blog Entries

  1. 1 point
    Hello the Biomedical 3D Printing community, it's Devarsh Vyas here writing after a really long time! This time i'd like to share my personal experience and challenges faced with respect to medical 3D Printing from the MRI data. This can be a knowledge sharing and a debatable topic and I am looking forward to hear and know what other experts here think of this as well with utmost respect. In the Just recently concluded RSNA conference at Chicago had a wave of technology advancements like AI and 3D Printing in radiology. Apart from that the shift of radiologists using more and more MR studies for investigations and the advancements with the MRI technology have forced radiologists and radiology centers (Private or Hospitals) to rely heavily on MRI studies. We are seeing medical 3D Printing becoming mainstream and gaining traction and excitement in the entire medical fraternity, for designers who use the dicom to 3D softwares, whether opensource or FDA approved software know that designing from CT is fairly automated because of the segmentation based on the CT hounsifield units however seldom we see the community discuss designing from MRI, Automation of segmentation from MRI data, Protocols for MRI scan for 3D Printing, Segmentation of soft tissues or organs from MRI data or working on an MRI scan for accurate 3D modeling. Currently designing from MRI is feasible, but implementation is challenging and time consuming. We should also note reading a MRI scan is a lot different than reading a CT scan, MRI requires high level of anatomical knowledge and expertise to be able to read, differentiate and understand the ROI to be 3D Printed. MRI shows a lot more detailed data which maybe unwanted in the model that we design. Although few MRI studies like the contrast MRI of the brain, Heart and MRI angiograms can be automatically segmented but scans like MRI of the spine or MRI of the liver, Kidney or MRI of knee for example would involve a lot of efforts, expertise and manual work to be done in order to reconstruct and 3D Print it just like how the surgeon would want it. Another challenge MRI 3D printing faces is the scan protocols, In CT the demand of high quality thin slices are met quite easily but in MRI if we go for protocols for T1 & T2 weighted isotropic data with equal matrix size and less than 1mm cuts, it would increase the scan time drastically which the patient has to bear in the gantry and the efficiency of the radiology department or center is affected. There is a lot of excitement to create 3D printed anatomical models from the ultrasound data as well and a lot of research is already being carried out in that direction, What i strongly believe is the community also need advancements in terms of MRI segmentation for 3D printing. MRI, in particular, holds great potential for 3D printing, given its excellent tissue characterization and lack of ionizing radiation but model accuracy, manual efforts in segmentation, scan protocols and expertise in reading and understanding the data for engineers have come up as a challenge the biomedical 3D printing community needs to address. These are all my personal views and experiences I've had with 3D Printing from MRI data. I'm open to and welcome any tips, discussions and knowledge sharing from all the other members, experts or enthusiasts who read this. Thank you very much!
  2. 1 point
    NRRD is a file format for storing and visualizing medical image data. Its main benefit over DICOM, the standard file format for medical imaging, is that NRRD files are anonymized and contain no sensitive patient information. Furthermore NRRD files can store a medical scan in a single file, whereas DICOM data sets are usually comprised of a directory or directories that contain dozens if not hundreds of individual files. NRRD is thus a good file for transferring medical scan data while protecting patient privacy. This tutorial will teach you how to create an NRRD file from a DICOM data set generated from a medical scan, such as a CT, MRI, ultrasound, or x-rays. To complete this tutorial you will need a CD or DVD with your medical imaging scan, or a downloaded DICOM data set from one of many online repositories. If you had a medical scan at a hospital or clinic you can usually obtain a CD or DVD from the radiology department after signing a waiver and paying a small copying fee. Step 1: Download Slicer Slicer is a free software program for medical imaging. It can be downloaded from the www.slicer.org. Once on the Slicer homepage, click on the Download link as shown in Figure 1. Figure 1 Slicer is available for Windows, Mac, and Linux. Choose your operating system and download the latest stable release as shown in Figure 2. Figure 2: Download Slicer Step 2: Copy the DICOM files into Slicer. Insert your CD or DVD containing your medical scan data into your CD or DVD drive, or open the folder containing your DICOM files if you have a downloaded data set. If you navigate into the folder directory, you will notice that there are usually multiple DICOM files in one or more directories, as shown in Figure 3. Navigate to the highest level folder containing all the DICOM files. Figure 3: There are many DICOM files in a study Open Slicer. The welcome screen will show, as demonstrated in Figure 4. Left click on the folder that contains the DICOM files and drop it onto the Welcome panel in Slicer. Slicer will ask you if you want to load the DICOM files into the DICOM database, as shown in Figure 5. Click OK Slicer will then ask you if you want to copy the files or merely add links. Click Copy as shown in Figure 6. Figure 4: Drag and drop the DICOM folder onto the Slicer Welcome window. Figures 5 and 6 After working for a minute or two, Slicer will tell you that the DICOM import was successful, as shown in Figure 7. Click OK Figure 7 Step 3: Open the Medical Scan in Slicer. At this point you should see a window called the DICOM Browser, as shown in Figure 8. The browser has three panels, which show the patient information, study information, and the individual series within each study. If you close the DICOM Browser and need to open it again, you can do so under the Modules menu, as shown in Figure 9. Figure 8: DICOM Browser Figure 9: Finding the DICOM browser Each series in a medical imaging scan is comprised of a stack of images that together make a volume. This volume can be used to make the NRRD file. Modern CT and MRI scans typically have multiple series and different orientations that were collected using different techniques. These multiple views of the same structures allow the doctors reading the scan to have the best chance of making the correct diagnosis. A detailed explanation of the different types of CT and MRI series is beyond the scope of this article, but will be covered in a future tutorial. Click on the single patient, study, and a series of interest. Click the Load button as shown in Figure 8. The series will then begin to load as shown in Figure 10. Figure 10: The study is loading Step 4: Save the Imaging Data in NRRD Format Once the series loads you will see the imaging data displayed in the Slicer windows. Click the Save button on the upper left-hand corner, as shown in Figure 11. Figure 11: Click the Save button The Save Scene dialog box will then appear. Two or more rows may be shown. Put a checkmark next to the row that has a name that ends in ".nrrd". Uncheck all other rows. Click the directory button for the nrrd file and specify the directory to save the file into. Then click the save button, as shown in Figure 12. Figure 12: Check the NRRD file and specify save directory. The NRRD file will now be saved in the directory you specified!
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