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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/05/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    3D modeling and printing from US data is pretty much the same as from CT... using treshold technique and generating mesh. The biggest problem, for now, is how to open DICOM data obtained from US because it differs to one obtained from CT in one of the software for sliceing (3D Slicer). For now, in 3D slicer you can open DICOM data from GE machines and Philips but people are working on enabling importing DICOM data from other manufacturers. Hope this helps a little bit
  2. 2 points
    I've only printed the skull, but it came out very well (see my comment), I haven't had to clean none of the surfaces of the file. Again, thanks for sharing this file 🙂
  3. 2 points
    Nice model of brain. It definitely needs supports. The printing on Prusa i3 MK3 consumed almost whole 1kg of filament and 90hrs of time (PLA filament 1.75mm, OPTIMAL print 0.15mm, with supports). Unfortunately I chose supports above the pad only, not everywhere, so there are some ugly places above the temporal lobes. It is a pity that the cerebellum is missing. Thanks!
  4. 2 points
    DIBENDUJOY

    vikram

    Version 1.0.0

    153 downloads

    craniotomy, stl, 3d, model, printable, parietal, frontal, temporal, occipital, orbit, nasal, bones, maxilla, craniotomy, neurosurgery, sutures, mastoid, apophysis

    Free

  5. 1 point
    If you want FDM printing with many colors you should consider the da Vinci Color from XYZ printing (https://www.xyzprinting.com/de-DE/product/da-vinci-color). The print quality is OK for an FDM printer. They are also not very reliable (compared to something like a Prusa MK3). But you can print with many colors and they lowered the prizes a bit.
  6. 1 point
    There seems to be lots of interest in this community regarding 3D printing from ultrasound images. Does anybody know of resources available to show how to do it? I'm sure many here would be interested.
  7. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    405 downloads

    This 3D printable model of a human heart was generated from a contrast enhanced CT scan. This model is an improvement over a prior version (here). It shows the heart with slices cut in the anatomical transverse plane. If you are interested in a heart with short-axis slices, check out my short-axis stackable slice model here. Notches have been added to ensure the slices fit together and do not slide against each other. The model demonstrates the detailed anatomy of the human heart in exquisite detail. Each slice stacks on top of the prior slice to form a complete human heart. Individual slices show the detailed cardiac anatomy of the right and left ventricles, and right and left atria, and outflow tracts. Perfect for educational purposes. It has been validated as printable on an Ultimaker 3 Extended printer. Technical parameters: manifold STL (watertight) vertices: 462576 triangles: 925800 dimensions: 15.1 x 15.2 x 10.5 cm

    $19.99

  8. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    34 downloads

    This 3D printable model of a normal human heart was generated from an ECG-gated contrast enhanced coronary CT scan. The slices are cut to illustrate the echocardiographic short-axis view. If you are interested in a 3D printable heart that shows slices in the anatomical transverse plane, click here. Notches have been added to ensure the slices fit together and do not slide against each other. The model demonstrates the detailed anatomy of the human heart in exquisite detail. Each slice stacks on top of the prior slice to form a complete human heart. There is a sturdy and stable base. Individual slices show the detailed cardiac anatomy of the right and left ventricles, and right and left atria, and outflow tracts in echocardiographic short-axis projection. Perfect for educational purposes. Technical parameters: Individual STLs: 4 Mesh integrity: manifold STL (watertight) vertices: appx 550k per object triangles: appx 1.1M per object dimensions: 11.4 x 9.1 x 10.6 cm

    $19.99

  9. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    3 downloads

    This file contains two printable circle of willis models. One is at life size and another magnified. It has been printed using Form 2 SLA printer and the second image is of the large model with support structures under xray which looks like cerebral angiography. Anterior parietal artery, Pericallosal artery, Posterior parietal artery, Artery of the angular gyrus, Posterior temporal artery, Second segment of the middle cerebral artery, Anterior communicating artery of the cerebrum (obscured by a vascular arch), First segment of the middle cerebral artery (sphenoid part), Temporal polar artery, Frontal orbital artery, Internal carotid artery, 3d, model, printable, .stl

    $5.00

  10. 1 point

    From the album: embodi3D 3D Printed Models

    This stackable heart with short-axis slices was 3D printed for a customer with strong red plastic. The print turned out great! The file can be downloaded here. To learn more about embodi3D's specialized medical 3D printing services, click here.
  11. 1 point
    Hello the Biomedical 3D Printing community, it's Devarsh Vyas here writing after a really long time! This time i'd like to share my personal experience and challenges faced with respect to medical 3D Printing from the MRI data. This can be a knowledge sharing and a debatable topic and I am looking forward to hear and know what other experts here think of this as well with utmost respect. In the Just recently concluded RSNA conference at Chicago had a wave of technology advancements like AI and 3D Printing in radiology. Apart from that the shift of radiologists using more and more MR studies for investigations and the advancements with the MRI technology have forced radiologists and radiology centers (Private or Hospitals) to rely heavily on MRI studies. We are seeing medical 3D Printing becoming mainstream and gaining traction and excitement in the entire medical fraternity, for designers who use the dicom to 3D softwares, whether opensource or FDA approved software know that designing from CT is fairly automated because of the segmentation based on the CT hounsifield units however seldom we see the community discuss designing from MRI, Automation of segmentation from MRI data, Protocols for MRI scan for 3D Printing, Segmentation of soft tissues or organs from MRI data or working on an MRI scan for accurate 3D modeling. Currently designing from MRI is feasible, but implementation is challenging and time consuming. We should also note reading a MRI scan is a lot different than reading a CT scan, MRI requires high level of anatomical knowledge and expertise to be able to read, differentiate and understand the ROI to be 3D Printed. MRI shows a lot more detailed data which maybe unwanted in the model that we design. Although few MRI studies like the contrast MRI of the brain, Heart and MRI angiograms can be automatically segmented but scans like MRI of the spine or MRI of the liver, Kidney or MRI of knee for example would involve a lot of efforts, expertise and manual work to be done in order to reconstruct and 3D Print it just like how the surgeon would want it. Another challenge MRI 3D printing faces is the scan protocols, In CT the demand of high quality thin slices are met quite easily but in MRI if we go for protocols for T1 & T2 weighted isotropic data with equal matrix size and less than 1mm cuts, it would increase the scan time drastically which the patient has to bear in the gantry and the efficiency of the radiology department or center is affected. There is a lot of excitement to create 3D printed anatomical models from the ultrasound data as well and a lot of research is already being carried out in that direction, What i strongly believe is the community also need advancements in terms of MRI segmentation for 3D printing. MRI, in particular, holds great potential for 3D printing, given its excellent tissue characterization and lack of ionizing radiation but model accuracy, manual efforts in segmentation, scan protocols and expertise in reading and understanding the data for engineers have come up as a challenge the biomedical 3D printing community needs to address. These are all my personal views and experiences I've had with 3D Printing from MRI data. I'm open to and welcome any tips, discussions and knowledge sharing from all the other members, experts or enthusiasts who read this. Thank you very much!
  12. 1 point
    NRRD is a file format for storing and visualizing medical image data. Its main benefit over DICOM, the standard file format for medical imaging, is that NRRD files are anonymized and contain no sensitive patient information. Furthermore NRRD files can store a medical scan in a single file, whereas DICOM data sets are usually comprised of a directory or directories that contain dozens if not hundreds of individual files. NRRD is thus a good file for transferring medical scan data while protecting patient privacy. This tutorial will teach you how to create an NRRD file from a DICOM data set generated from a medical scan, such as a CT, MRI, ultrasound, or x-rays. To complete this tutorial you will need a CD or DVD with your medical imaging scan, or a downloaded DICOM data set from one of many online repositories. If you had a medical scan at a hospital or clinic you can usually obtain a CD or DVD from the radiology department after signing a waiver and paying a small copying fee. Step 1: Download Slicer Slicer is a free software program for medical imaging. It can be downloaded from the www.slicer.org. Once on the Slicer homepage, click on the Download link as shown in Figure 1. Figure 1 Slicer is available for Windows, Mac, and Linux. Choose your operating system and download the latest stable release as shown in Figure 2. Figure 2: Download Slicer Step 2: Copy the DICOM files into Slicer. Insert your CD or DVD containing your medical scan data into your CD or DVD drive, or open the folder containing your DICOM files if you have a downloaded data set. If you navigate into the folder directory, you will notice that there are usually multiple DICOM files in one or more directories, as shown in Figure 3. Navigate to the highest level folder containing all the DICOM files. Figure 3: There are many DICOM files in a study Open Slicer. The welcome screen will show, as demonstrated in Figure 4. Left click on the folder that contains the DICOM files and drop it onto the Welcome panel in Slicer. Slicer will ask you if you want to load the DICOM files into the DICOM database, as shown in Figure 5. Click OK Slicer will then ask you if you want to copy the files or merely add links. Click Copy as shown in Figure 6. Figure 4: Drag and drop the DICOM folder onto the Slicer Welcome window. Figures 5 and 6 After working for a minute or two, Slicer will tell you that the DICOM import was successful, as shown in Figure 7. Click OK Figure 7 Step 3: Open the Medical Scan in Slicer. At this point you should see a window called the DICOM Browser, as shown in Figure 8. The browser has three panels, which show the patient information, study information, and the individual series within each study. If you close the DICOM Browser and need to open it again, you can do so under the Modules menu, as shown in Figure 9. Figure 8: DICOM Browser Figure 9: Finding the DICOM browser Each series in a medical imaging scan is comprised of a stack of images that together make a volume. This volume can be used to make the NRRD file. Modern CT and MRI scans typically have multiple series and different orientations that were collected using different techniques. These multiple views of the same structures allow the doctors reading the scan to have the best chance of making the correct diagnosis. A detailed explanation of the different types of CT and MRI series is beyond the scope of this article, but will be covered in a future tutorial. Click on the single patient, study, and a series of interest. Click the Load button as shown in Figure 8. The series will then begin to load as shown in Figure 10. Figure 10: The study is loading Step 4: Save the Imaging Data in NRRD Format Once the series loads you will see the imaging data displayed in the Slicer windows. Click the Save button on the upper left-hand corner, as shown in Figure 11. Figure 11: Click the Save button The Save Scene dialog box will then appear. Two or more rows may be shown. Put a checkmark next to the row that has a name that ends in ".nrrd". Uncheck all other rows. Click the directory button for the nrrd file and specify the directory to save the file into. Then click the save button, as shown in Figure 12. Figure 12: Check the NRRD file and specify save directory. The NRRD file will now be saved in the directory you specified!
  13. 1 point
    If you are planning on using the democratiz3D service to automatically convert a medical scan to a 3D printable STL model, or you just happen to be working with medical scans for another reason, it is important to know if you are working with a CT (Computed Tomography or CAT) or MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) scan. In this tutorial I'll show you how to quickly and easily tell the difference between a CT and MRI. I am a board-certified radiologist, and spent years mastering the subtleties of radiology physics for my board examinations and clinical practice. My goal here is not to bore you with unnecessary detail, although I am capable of that, but rather to give you a quick, easy, and practical way to understand the difference between CT and MRI if you are a non-medical person. Interested in Medical 3D Printing? Here are some resources: Free downloads of hundreds of 3D printable medical models. Automatically generate your own 3D printable medical models from CT scans. Have a question? Post a question or comment in the medical imaging forum. A Brief Overview of How CT and MRI Works For both CT (left) and MRI (right) scans you will lie on a moving table and be put into a circular machine that looks like a big doughnut. The table will move your body into the doughnut hole. The scan will then be performed. You may or may not get IV contrast through an IV. The machines look very similar but the scan pictures are totally different! CT and CAT Scans are the Same A CT scan, from Computed Tomography, and a CAT scan from Computed Axial Tomography are the same thing. CT scans are based on x-rays. A CT scanner is basically a rotating x-ray machine that takes sequential x-ray pictures of your body as it spins around. A computer then takes the data from the individual images, combines that with the known angle and position of the image at the time of exposure, and re-creates a three-dimensional representation of the body. Because CT scans are based on x-rays, bones are white and air is black on a CT scan just as it is on an x-ray as shown in Figure 1 below. Modern CT scanners are very fast, and usually the scan is performed in less than five minutes. Figure 1: A standard chest x-ray. Note that bones are white and air is black. Miscle and fat are shades of gray. CT scans are based on x-ray so body structures have the same color as they don on an x-ray. How does MRI Work? MRI uses a totally different mechanism to generate an image. MRI images are made using hydrogen atoms in your body and magnets. Yes, super strong magnets. Hydrogen is present in water, fat, protein, and most of the "soft tissue" structures of the body. The doughnut of an MRI does not house a rotating x-ray machine as it does in a CT scanner. Rather, it houses a superconducting electromagnet, basically a super strong magnet. The hydrogen atoms in your body line up with the magnetic field. Don't worry, this is perfectly safe and you won't feel anything. A radio transmitter, yes just like an FM radio station transmitter, will send some radio waves into your body, which will knock some of the hydrogen atoms out of alignment. As the hydrogen nuclei return back to their baseline position they emit a signal that can be measured and used to generate an image. MRI Pulse Sequences Differ Among Manufacturers The frequency, intensity, and timing of the radio waves used to excite the hydrogen atoms, called a "pulse sequence," can be modified so that only certain hydrogen atoms are excited and emit a signal. For example, when using a Short Tau Inversion Recovery (STIR) pulse sequence hydrogen atoms attached to fat molecules are turned off. When using a Fluid Attenuation Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) pulse sequence, hydrogen atoms attached to water molecules are turned off. Because there are so many variables that can be tweaked there are literally hundreds if not thousands of ways that pulse sequences can be constructed, each generating a slightly different type of image. To further complicate the matter, medical scanner manufacturers develop their own custom flavors of pulse sequences and give them specific brand names. So a balanced gradient echo pulse sequence is called True FISP on a Siemens scanner, FIESTA on a GE scanner, Balanced FFE on Philips, BASG on Hitachi, and True SSFP on Toshiba machines. Here is a list of pulse sequence names from various MRI manufacturers. This Radiographics article gives more detail about MRI physics if you want to get into the nitty-gritty. Figure 2: Examples of MRI images from the same patient. From left to right, T1, T2, FLAIR, and T1 post-contrast images of the brain in a patient with a right frontal lobe brain tumor. Note that tissue types (fat, water, blood vessels) can appear differently depending on the pulse sequence and presence of IV contrast. How to Tell the Difference Between a CT Scan and an MRI Scan? A Step by Step Guide Step 1: Read the Radiologist's Report The easiest way to tell what kind of a scan you had is to read the radiologist's report. All reports began with a formal title that will say what kind of scan you had, what body part was imaged, and whether IV contrast was used, for example "MRI brain with and without IV contrast," or "CT abdomen and pelvis without contrast." Step 2: Remember Your Experience in the MRI or CT (CAT) Scanner Were you on the scanner table for less than 10 minutes? If so you probably had a CT scan as MRIs take much longer. Did you have to wear earmuffs to protect your hearing from loud banging during the scan? If so, that was an MRI as the shifting magnetic fields cause the internal components of the machine to make noise. Did you have to drink lots of nasty flavored liquid a few hours before the scan? If so, this is oral contrast and is almost always for a CT. How to tell the difference between CT and MRI by looking at the pictures If you don't have access to the radiology report and don't remember the experience in the scanner because the scan was A) not done on you, or you were to drunk/high/sedated to remember, then you may have to figure out what kind of scan you had by looking at the pictures. This can be complicated, but don't fear I'll show you how to figure it out in this section. First, you need to get a copy of your scan. You can usually get this from the radiology or imaging department at the hospital or clinic where you had the scan performed. Typically these come on a CD or DVD. The disc may already have a program that will allow you to view the scan. If it doesn't, you'll have to download a program capable of reading DICOM files, such as 3D Slicer. Open your scan according to the instructions of your specific program. You may notice that your scan is composed of several sets of images, called series. Each series contains a stack of images. For CT scans these are usually images in different planes (axial, coronal, and sagittal) or before and after administration of IV contrast. For MRI each series is usually a different pulse sequence, which may also be before or after IV contrast. Step 3: Does the medical imaging software program tell you what kind of scan you have? Most imaging software programs will tell you what kind of scan you have under a field called "modality." The picture below shows a screen capture from 3D Slicer. Looking at the Modality column makes it pretty obvious that this is a CT scan. Figure 3: A screen capture from the 3D Slicer program shows the kind of scan under the modality column. Step 4: Can you see the CAT scan or MRI table the patient is laying on? If you can see the table that the patient is laying on or a brace that their head or other body part is secured in, you probably have a CT scan. MRI tables and braces are designed of materials that don't give off a signal in the MRI machine, so they are invisible. CT scan tables absorb some of the x-ray photons used to make the picture, so they are visible on the scan. Figure 4: A CT scan (left) and MRI (right) that show the patient table visible on the CT but not the MRI. Step 5: Is fat or water white? MRI usually shows fat and water as white. In MRI scans the fat underneath the skin or reservoirs of water in the body can be either white or dark in appearance, depending on the pulse sequence. For CT however, fat and water are almost never white. Look for fat just underneath the skin in almost any part of the body. Structures that contained mostly water include the cerebrospinal fluid around the spinal cord in the spinal canal and around the brain, the vitreous humor inside the eyeballs, bile within the gallbladder and biliary tree of the liver, urine within the bladder and collecting systems of the kidneys, and in some abnormal states such as pleural fluid in the thorax and ascites in the abdomen. It should be noted that water-containing structures can be made to look white on CT scans by intentional mixing of contrast in the structures in highly specialized scans, such as in a CT urogram or CT myelogram. But in general if either fat or fluid in the body looks white, you are dealing with an MRI. Step 6: Is the bone black? CT never shows bones as black. If you can see bony structures on your scan and they are black or dark gray in coloration, you are dealing with an MRI. On CT scans the bone is always white because the calcium blocks (attenuates) the x-ray photons. The calcium does not emit a signal in MRI scans, and thus appears dark. Bone marrow can be made to also appear dark on certain MRI pulse sequences, such as STIR sequences. If your scan shows dark bones and bone marrow, you are dealing with an MRI. A question I am often asked is "If bones are white on CT scans, if I see white bones can I assume it is a CT?" Unfortunately not. The calcium in bones does not emit signal on MRI and thus appears black. However, many bones also contain bone marrow which has a great deal of fat. Certain MRI sequences like T1 and T2 depict fat as bright white, and thus bone marrow-containing bone will look white on the scans. An expert can look carefully at the bone and discriminate between the calcium containing cortical bone and fat containing medullary bone, but this is beyond what a layperson will notice without specialized training. Self Test: Examples of CT and MRI Scans Here are some examples for you to test your newfound knowledge. Example 1 Figure 5A: A mystery scan of the brain Look at the scan above. Can you see the table that the patient is laying on? No, so this is probably an MRI. Let's not be hasty in our judgment and find further evidence to confirm our suspicion. Is the cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the brain and in the ventricles of the brain white? No, on this scan the CSF appears black. Both CT scans and MRIs can have dark appearing CSF, so this doesn't help us. Is the skin and thin layer of subcutaneous fat on the scalp white? Yes it is. That means this is an MRI. Well, if this is an MRI than the bones of the skull, the calvarium, should be dark, right? Yes, and indeed the calvarium is as shown in Figure 5B. You can see the black egg shaped oval around the brain, which is the calcium containing skull. The only portion of the skull that is white is in the frontal area where fat containing bone marrow is present between two thin layers of calcium containing bony cortex. This is an MRI. Figure 5B: The mystery scan is a T1 spoiled gradient echo MRI image of the brain. Incidentally this person has a brain tumor involving the left frontal lobe. Example 2 Figure 6A: Another mystery scan of the brain Look at the scan above. Let's go through our process to determine if this is a CT or MRI. First of all, can you see the table the patient is lying on or brace? Yes you can, there is a U-shaped brace keeping the head in position for the scan. We can conclude that this is a CT scan. Let's investigate further to confirm our conclusion. Is fat or water white? If either is white, then this is an MRI. In this scan we can see both fat underneath the skin of the cheeks which appears dark gray to black. Additionally, the material in the eyeball is a dark gray, immediately behind the relatively white appearing lenses of the eye. Finally, the cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the brainstem appears gray. This is not clearly an MRI, which further confirms our suspicion that it is a CT. If indeed this is a CT, then the bones of the skull should be white, and indeed they are. You can see the bright white shaped skull surrounding the brain. You can even see part of the cheekbones, the zygomatic arch, extending forward just outside the eyes. This is a CT scan. Figure 6B: The mystery scan is a CT brain without IV contrast. Example 3 Figure 7A: A mystery scan of the abdomen In this example we see an image through the upper abdomen depicting multiple intra-abdominal organs. Let's use our methodology to try and figure out what kind of scan this is. First of all, can you see the table that the patient is laying on? Yes you can. That means we are dealing with the CT. Let's go ahead and look for some additional evidence to confirm our suspicion. Do the bones appear white? Yes they do. You can see the white colored thoracic vertebrae in the center of the image, and multiple ribs are present, also white. If this is indeed a CT scan than any water-containing structures should not be white, and indeed they are not. In this image there are three water-containing structures. The spinal canal contains cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The pickle shaped gallbladder can be seen just underneath the liver. Also, this patient has a large (and benign) left kidney cyst. All of these structures appear a dark gray. Also, the fat underneath the skin is a dark gray color. This is not in MRI. It is a CT. Figure 7B: The mystery scan is a CT of the abdomen with IV contrast Example 4 Figure 8A: A mystery scan of the left thigh Identifying this scan is challenging. Let's first look for the presence of the table. We don't see one but the image may have been trimmed to exclude it, or the image area may just not be big enough to see the table. We can't be sure a table is in present but just outside the image. Is the fat under the skin or any fluid-filled structures white? If so, this would indicate it is an MRI. The large white colored structure in the middle of the picture is a tumor. The fat underneath the skin is not white, it is dark gray in color. Also, the picture is through the mid thigh and there are no normal water containing structures in this area, so we can't use this to help us. Well, if this is a CT scan than the bone should be white. Is it? The answer is no. We can see a dark donut-shaped structure just to the right of the large white tumor. This is the femur bone, the major bone of the thigh and it is black. This cannot be a CT. It must be an MRI. This example is tricky because a fat suppression pulse sequence was used to turn the normally white colored fat a dark gray. Additionally no normal water containing structures are present on this image. The large tumor in the mid thigh is lighting up like a lightbulb and can be confusing and distracting. But, the presence of black colored bone is a dead giveaway. Figure 8B: The mystery scan is a contrast-enhanced T2 fat-suppressed MRI Conclusion: Now You Can Determine is a Scan is CT or MRI This tutorial outlines a simple process that anybody can use to identify whether a scan is a CT or MRI. The democratiz3D service on this website can be used to convert any CT scan into a 3D printable bone model. Soon, a feature will be added that will allow you to convert a brain MRI into a 3D printable model. Additional features will be forthcoming. The service is free and easy to use, but you do need to tell it what kind of scan your uploading. Hopefully this tutorial will help you identify your scan. If you'd like to learn more about the democratiz3D service click here. Thank you very much and I hope you found this tutorial to be helpful. Nothing in this article should be considered medical advice. If you have a medical question, ask your doctor.
  14. 1 point
    MFudge

    Nasal cavity with paranasal sinuses

    Printed using a SLS sPro60. turned out fantastic.
  15. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    WZ anterior mandible - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. Learn More. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. lower, teeth, tooth, dental, dentistry, mandible, angle, body, upper, 3d, model, .stl, bone

    Free

  16. 1 point
    MMMMATT

    Spine full

    Version 1.0.0

    128 downloads

    from cat scan, bone, stl, dicom, 3dmodel, lumbar, spine, vertebrae,

    Free

  17. 1 point

    From the album: embodi3D 3D Printed Models

    This skull with left MCA aneurysm was printed by embodi3D for a customer who wants to use the model for simulating neurosurgical aneurysm clipping.
  18. 1 point
    We 3D printed this model for a customer and the print turned out beautifully. The parts stack nicely and by opening them up, you can clearly see the detailed structures inside the heart chambers. To learn more about our 3D printing service, click here. Here is another print we did in flexible material at 2/3 scale, as requested by the customer. The flexible material has a soft, rubbery feel that is very nice to handle.
  19. 1 point

    From the album: embodi3D 3D Printed Models

    This skull with left MCA aneurysm was printed by embodi3D for a customer who wants to use the model for simulating neurosurgical aneurysm clipping.
  20. 1 point

    From the album: embodi3D 3D Printed Models

    This skull with left MCA aneurysm was printed by embodi3D for a customer who wants to use the model for simulating neurosurgical aneurysm clipping.
  21. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    28 downloads

    Kidney 3D .stl file extracted from slicer 3D sample data

    Free

  22. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    39 downloads

    Wynik_STL - stl file processed Have embodi3D 3D print this model for you. Learn More. This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. 3d, model, .stl, printable, Distal phalanx (tuft), Distal phalanx, Distal interphalangeal joint, Proximal interphalangeal joint, Middle phalanx, Head of the proximal phalanx, Proximal phalanx, Metacarpophalangeal joint, Base of the proximal phalanx, Metacarpal head, Sesamoid, Metacarpal, Metacarpal base, Capitate, Trapezoid, Hamate, Trapezium, Triquetrum, Scaphoid, Pisiform, Radial styloid, Ulnar styloid, Lunate, Distal radius, Distal radioulnar jointDistal ulna, 3d, model, .stl, upper, limb, hand, wrist, upper, limb, bone

    Free

  23. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    12 downloads

    Segmented lumbar spine and sacrum, young adult. This includes L1 through L5 vertebral bodies and the sacrum .STL files for the intervertebral disks and pelvis are available as a separate download.

    $6.00

  24. 1 point
    I am a biomedical engineer, I own a CAD/3D print Company in Croatia. My Company is specialized in production of 3D printed moulds for making patient specific cranial implants out of PMMA. This is a rather cost effective way to produce patient specific cranial impants. I use Solidworks for designing implants and moulds. This software isn´t free, but it's cheaper than Geomagic. The whole procedure is described in an article I have published on my LinkedIn page: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/pmma-cranial-impants-more-cost-effective-solution-josip-rauker/
  25. 1 point
    rishabhjaiswal

    image extraction

    Hello, I want to extract the geometry fro angiographic data ....please tell me......it is an aneurysm ...cerebral.....I Have data with me ....which is in angiographic formate
  26. 1 point
    Hi everyone, I have been printing for a long time with my Ultimaker 2+. As a result I am limited when it comes to creating detailed models that have extensive organic shapes like branching vessels etc... There is only so much supports and laborious cleanup can do. I have not been able to test the Ultimaker S5 with the addition of dissolvable materials. Knowing what I am after would you recommend skipping FDM printing and looking at the Form2? Are there Pros and Cons that apply to medical or organic model printing beyond build volume that would be valuable when considering what direction to go? Lastly, I realize that it can be difficult to calculate cost, but what overall expenses would one expect to see from the same part printed by FDM vs SLA? Any help, suggestions or advice would be greatly appreciated.
  27. 1 point
    kopachini

    image extraction

    you have several tutorial videos on this web page how to segment a model. but instead of bones which are in the video, you choose contrast blood to segment. https://www.embodi3d.com/tutorials.html/
  28. 1 point
    Hi Mike, Is there a Mayo Clinic Collaborative 3D Printing in Medical Practice 2019? I can't seem to find any current information on it?
  29. 1 point
    Great tutorial, very complete and well thought out. Do you prefer 3Dslicer to Horos? Are there advantages or quality differences worth mentioning? Will the Democtatiz3D app offer vasculature as an operation in the future?
  30. 1 point
    los

    Looking for DICOM files

    New Mexico is working on getting a CT database up and running some time in 2019. Below is recent link https://www.forensicmag.com/news/2019/01/ct-scans-database-new-mexico-could-be-game-changer?et_cid=6584525&et_rid=454861088&type=headline&et_cid=6584525&et_rid=454861088&linkid=https%3a%2f%2fwww.forensicmag.com%2fnews%2f2019%2f01%2fct-scans-database-new-mexico-could-be-game-changer%3fet_cid%3d6584525%26et_rid%3d%%subscriberid%%%26type%3dheadline
  31. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    10 downloads

    Ankmr - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. bone, .stl, 3d, model, printable, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital, craniotomy, skull, head, zygomatic, arch, fracture, maxilla, mandible, angle, ramus, body, mastoid, process, styloid, pterygoid, clinoid, apophysis, sphenoid, orbit, petrous, ridge, facial, nasal,

    Free

  32. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    18 downloads

    Salim ali al badi - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more.

    Free

  33. 1 point
    I am a neurosurgeon. The simplest way to solve most of our problems in a low cost and rather according to the rules way is to first to print the patients skull (easy). Than to form manually, slowly and exactly a lacking bone from the cheap, available everywhere in the world dental molds (I have succeeded with silicone prosthetic mold). When the bone substitute is ready and firm, then make an impress in a stomatologic acrylic mass (methacrylate, the ubiquitous surgical material), also available everywhere. Its the same component that we use to form a bone in the operating theatre, but not sterile. If you have the mold ready, you can sterilise it in a plasma autoclave, put in a sterile foil bag in the operating theatre and then form in this foil and form a lacking skull piece from a classic methacrylate. Sterile, with all of the certificates needed. It does work. Ready 3D printed skull flaps are often imperfect. I.e. they do not take into consideration brain swelling, soft tissue remodelling etc. The mold and forming the bone flap during surgery from PMMA seems to be much more versatile. And you do not have to throw away the bone substitute of 2000 USD into trash. Best regards, Piotr
  34. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    6 downloads

    spinosa - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more.

    Free

  35. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    14 downloads

    cat scan - stl file processed, back, leg, pelvis, stl, 3dmodel, bone, vetrinary, tail, column, lumbar

    Free

  36. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    44 downloads

    knee and bones - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. 3d, femur, model, .stl, lower, limb, Femur, Patella, Lateral femoral epicondyle, Medial femoral epicondyle, Lateral femoral condyle, Medial femoral condyle, Lateral tibial condyle, Medial tibial condyle, Medial and lateral tubercles of the intercondylar eminence, Fibular head, Tibia, Fibula,

    Free

  37. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    4 downloads

    test - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more. skull, head, osteology, bone, 3d, model, .stl, printable, frontal, parietal, temporal, zygomatic, arch, maxilla, upper, teeth, orbit, veterinary, animal

    Free

  38. 1 point
    ExplorationArchitect

    Horse head

    Version 1.0.0

    19 downloads

    this is a horse head, maxilla, mandible, orbit, eye, brain, sinus, nasal, septum, teeth, veterinary, animal, ct, without, contrast 3d, model, dicom

    Free

  39. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    25 downloads

    Cat Skull - stl file processed This file was created with democratiz3D. Automatically create 3D printable models from CT scans. Learn more.3d skull, stl, bone, cat, zygomatic arch, temporal, frontal, parietal, maxilla, mandible, teeth, canine, cervical, spine, orbit, auditory, canal, inner, occipital, 3d, model, printable

    Free

  40. 1 point
    Here are two volumes obtained by GE Voluson E10 and exported as .stl file. I think that a lot depends on fetal head position and gestation age if you want to have nice fetal face model. Personally, I wasn't present when study was made.
  41. 1 point
    Dr. Mike

    Holes in bone models with democratiz3D

    I'd like to elaborate on this topic a bit, as I recently had another member inquire about this issue. The member was creating a model from a CT scan of the clavicles. As you can see, there are holes in the medial (midline) ends of both clavicles. What is causing this? Is it a problem with democratiz3D? How can it be fixed? The issue lies with the patient's anatomy and the quality of the original CT scan. In the human body there are areas where bones are naturally very thin. Sometimes, the bone surface (cortex) can be paper thin. Also, some patients who have conditions like osteoporosis may have very little calcium in their bones. Issues like this make it very hard for the CT scanner to detect the bone wall, as you can see from the image below which shows the area on the left clavicle that has a hole in the final model (red arrow). The problem isn't with democratiz3D, but with the quality of the CT scan or with the patient having thin bones (how dare they!). democratiz3D is actually creating the model exactly as it appears on the CT, its just that the CT has holes we don't want! So, what can be done? If you encounter this problem you have two options. 1) Manually fix the holes in the model with a mesh editor like Meshmixer, or 2) decrease the threshold value in democratiz3D and re-process the scan. Decreasing the threshold tells the system to capture more voxels in your model, potentially capturing more thin or osteoporotic bone. But, be careful. If you reduce the threshold too much (less than 100), you run the risk of starting to capture muscle, organs, and vessels in your bone model. If you are not sure what threshold to use, you can experiment by running your scan through democratiz3D using different thresholds. To save time, I suggest you do this on low or medium quality setting. When you find a threshold that works, you can generate your final model using a higher (and more time consuming) quality setting, like High or Ultra. If you are familiar with mesh editing software, that is probably the fastest way to correct this problem. Just delete the edge of the hole, fill it in with a new face, and run a quick smooth operation on the area. It's a 1 minute fix if you know the keyboard shortcuts. I hope this tip helps. Dr. Mike
  42. 1 point
    Dr. Mike

    Holes in bone models with democratiz3D

    I received this inquiry from a member. I am going to post the response here so that it can help others with the same question: QUESTION: "I am printing out a spine model.... Why are there so many defects in the rendering? I can't print this out on a 3d printer, half of the vertebrae are hollow. I get these from a 3d CT and on a computer monitor, the vertebrae are whole. Just take a look at the thumbnails and you'll know what I'm talking about. I don't have the expertise or time to fill all of the defects. Is there a paid service somewhere that could do this for me? I'm just surprised the STL file wouldn't look like the 3d CT since they use the same dicom imagery?" ANSWER: If you are creating bony models and are finding that the bones have holes or other large defects in them (see above), this is probably an issue with the Threshold value used during the conversion. Threshold is the number of Hounsfield units to use to create the surface of the model. Anything above the threshold value is considered bone and is included. Anything below is not considered bone and is excluded. Normal cortical bone is very dense, greater than 300 Hounsfield units, so the default threshold of 150 is more than enough to catch it. The inside of the bone (medullary, or marrow cavity) is filled with fatty bone marrow and is a much lower Hounsfield value. If the patient has osteoporosis or very thin cortical bones they may not register as bone if the default threshold of 150 is used. You can decrease this to a lower threshold value (maybe 100 or so) and you will be more likely to capture this thin, deossified bone. If you go too low though (60 or so) you will start to capture non-bony structures like muscle. Another thing that may help get the highest quality models is using premium operations such as Very Detailed Bone and Ultra quality level. These operations are time-consuming however. To save on time, you can run your scan through democratiz3D using free operations such as Detailed Bone and medium or high quality until you find the threshold you like. Once you find the threshold value you like, you can run you scan through a final time using the highest quality (and slowest) operation settings, such as Very Detailed Bone and Ultra quality. Hope this helps! Dr. Mike
  43. 1 point

    Version STL

    46 downloads

    This is a .stl file of a left temporal bone ready for 3d printing. I have segmented a CT scan paying attention to all the important bony structures of the ear. In the .stl screenshots you can see the mastoid, malleus, incus, the bony canal of the facial nerve, the stylomastoid foramen Etc. I do this for my training and the idea is to perform a mastoidectomy just in my desktop i have printed my personal 3d plaster model (you can see in the screenshots) but i haven't the courage to destroy it whit the drill..... I hope that my work can be of help to anyone who wants to try to drill a faithful model of temporal bone at home or simply want to study the anatomy in a versatile 3d .stl Model Good Job Nicola Di Giuseppe M.D.

    $2.99

  44. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    7 downloads

    Pelvis scan - stl file processed

    Free

  45. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    29 downloads

    This model is the right lower extremity bone rendering of a 65-year-old male with left thigh myxoid fibrosarcoma. At the time of diagnosis, the patient had metastases to his lungs. The patient therefore underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy and was found to have an intermediate grade lesion at the time of diagnosis. The patient is still living with the metastatic disease at 2.5 years since diagnosis. This is an STL file created from DICOM images of his CT scan which may be used for 3D printing. The leg includes the area between the knee and the ankle and houses the tibia and fibula. The proximal tibia includes the medial plateau (which is concave) and the lateral plateau (which is convex). The Proximal tibia has a 7-10 degree posterior slope. The tibial tuberosity is located on the anterior proximal tibia, which is where the patellar tendon attaches. On the anteromedial surface of the tibia is Gerdy's tubercle, where the sartorius, gracilis, and semitendinosus attach. The distal tibia creates the superior and medial (plafond and medial malleolus) of the ankle joint. The proximal fibula is the attachment for the posterolateral corner structures of the knee joint. The peroneal nerve wraps around the fibular neck. The distal fibula is the lateral malleolus and a common site for ankle fractures. The ankle is a hinge (or ginglymus) joint made of the distal tibia (tibial plafond, medial and posterior malleoli) superiorly and medially, the distal fibula (lateral malleolus) laterally and the talus inferiorly. Together, these structures form the ankle “mortise”, which refers to the bony arch. Normal range of motion is 20 degrees dorsiflexion and 50 degrees plantarflexion. Stability is provided by the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), calcaneofibular ligament (CFL), and posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) laterally, and the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments medially. The ankle is one of my most common sites of musculoskeletal injury, including ankle fractures and ankle sprains, due to the ability of the joint to invert and evert. The most common ligament involved in the ATFL. The foot is commonly divided into three segments: hindfoot, midfoot, and forefoot. These sections are divided by the transverse tarsal joint (between the talus and calcaneus proximally and navicular and cuboid distally), and the tarsometatarsal joint (between the cuboids and cuneiforms proximally and the metatarsals distally). The first tarsometatarsal joint (medially) is termed the “Lisfranc” joint, and is the site of the Lisfranc injury seen primarily in athletic injuries. This model was created from the file STS_022.

    Free

  46. 1 point
    Pictures from the 2017 Mayo Collaborative 3D Printing in Medical Practice Conference held in Scottsdale Arizona in March 2017.
  47. 1 point
    tsehrhardt

    Materials for fracture experiments

    I was wondering if anybody has found a 3D printing material that works well for fracture studies. I am aware of Sawbones, but would like to explore the possibility of using CT scans to generate 3D printed bones of different size/age/sex for fracture/trauma studies. Thanks! Terrie
  48. 1 point
  49. 1 point

    154 downloads

    Alzheimer's disease is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, responsible for 85,000 deaths annually. These STL files allow you to 3D print a whole brain model with Alzheimers disease and another model of the enlarged brain ventricles associated with the disease. Alzheimer's is a neurodegenerative disease usually seen in the later stages of life. Problems with memory, behavior, performing daily activities and personality changes are common symptoms. It is a progressive disease, where dementia symptoms gradually worsen over a number of years. The destruction and loss of nerve cells associated with this disease are represented in the models. The models are provided for distribution on embodi3D.com with the permission of the creators Dr. Beth Ripley and Dr. Tatiana. These models are part of the Top 10 Killers 3D printable disease library. James Weaver and Ahmed Hosny also contributed to the project. We thank everyone involved for their contributions to embodi3d.com and their advocacy for better health and education through 3D printing. There are two STL files available for download and 3D bioprinting. One STL file for printing the ventricles and the other STL is for printing the whole brain. These files are distributed under the Creative Commons license Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs. Please respect the terms of the licensing agreement. Both files are verified as watertight (manifold) and 3D printable.

    Free

  50. 1 point

    135 downloads

    This 3D printable STL file of the splenic artery shows three aneurysms. This model was created from a CT scan and used in pre-surgical testing. It accompanies the blog article Saving a Spleen with 3D Printing: Pre-Surgical Planning with Medical Models make "Impossible" Surgeries Possible. The file is distributed under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs license. If you wish to use this file for commercial purposes, please contact the author.

    Free

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