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Skull, Head, and Neck CTs

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Medical scan files related to 3D printing skulls.

629 files

  1. $1.99

    5BoneIdose

    maxillofacial, cleft, palate, orbital, floor, skull, trauma, ct, scan, without, contrast, axial, dicom, 3d, model, printable, bone, paranasal, sinuses, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital lower, turbinates, nasal, septum, maxillary, sinus, ethmoid, cells, clinoid, apophysis, petrous, ridge, mastoid, process, foramen, magnum, foramina, base, skull, atlas, axis, cervical,spine, temporomandibular, joint, external, auditory, conduct, sphenoid, orbit, eyeball, palate, hard, fracture, .stl, tongue, mandible, angle, pterygoid, pharynx, larynx, teeth, tooth, incisor, molar, premolar,
    CT Scan of a face in preparation for a septoplasty. 
     
    Face has the following hx of trauma:
    bilaterial incomplete cleft lip and palate (repaired when pt. approx age 6 mo) bone graft upper lip region (pt approx age 7) RED II maxillofacial expansion (look for expansion region as well as skull trauma from screws; pt approx age 14)  broken nose (pt age approx 18)  broken right orbital floor (pt age approx 22)  
    ct taken when pt was approx 32

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  2. $20.00

    facial skeleton

    .stl, ct, scan, without, contrast, facial, neck, skull, bone, 3d, model, .stl, printable, orbit, lower, temporal, frontal, parietal, nasal, spine, atlas, axis, cervical, thyroid, gland, trachea, esophagus, pterygoid, process, hyoid, mastoid, petrous, ridge, cells, ethmoid, maxillary, sinus, larynx, sternocleidomastoid, maxilla, mandible, incisor, molar, premolar, canine,teeth, tooth, tongue, eyeball, fracture, cerebellum, brain, 
    CT of facial skeleton, neck and head
    multi fractured nose with displacement
    lower walls of eye sockets fractured
    jaw bays fractured
    left zygoma slightly fractured
    air bubble in left jaw bay area
    large soft tisue swelling of left part of facial

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  3. $5.00

    Skull

    CT Scan of brain and skull
    Nothing abnormal, ct without contrast, skull, brain, chris, head, stl, neck, bone

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  4. $100.00

    skull_fracture

    CT scan skull, skull, fracture, 3d, model, stl, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital, head, ethmoid, cells, orbit, mastoid, maxillary, sinus, teeth, canine, incisive, hard, palate, cervical, spine, dicom

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  5. $2.00

    Head scan broken neck

    Scan of a head from a dislocation of a vertebrae, axial, ct, scan, without, contrast, .stl, dicom, head, skull, brain, bone, ethmoid, cells, nasal, vomer, maxillary, sinus, sphenoid, mastoid, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital, petrous, ridge, cerebellum, brainstem, clinoid, apophysis, magnum, foramen,

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  6. $100.00

    CT Scan

    CT Scan, orbit, nasal, septum, eyeball, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital, petrous, ridge, mastoid, process, clinoid, clivus, foramen, magnum, intraconal, extraconal, maxillary, sinus, paranasal, sinuses, inner, ear, head, cerebellum, skull, brain

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  7. $20.00

    kavita

    This is a cbct scan of maxilla for which a model has to be made for zygoma implant planning

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  8. $20.00

    ratnadeep

    cbct maxilla and mandible 

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  9. $4.99

    Hollow Anterior Circulation with left MCA aneurysm

    This is a hollow life-size model of the internal carotid arteries and anterior circulation (MCA, ACA, ACOM) part of circle of Willis. 
     
    I have printed this using elastic resin and a form 2 printer and was able to practice coiling of the aneurysm on the model.
     
    This is great for interventional neuroradiology, endovascular neurosurgery, and general endovascular training.
     
    Will also help explaining what an intracranial aneurysm to patients.
     
    Hope you enjoy printing and using it. 
     
    Please let me know if you have any feedback/ queries.
     
    Second segment of the middle, cerebral artery,  Second segment of the anterior cerebral artery, anterior communicating artery, Internal carotid artery, 3d, model, .stl, printable, circle of Willis,
     
     
     
     

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  10. $3.99

    Abhi_Gajjar

    Patient's specific Cranioplate / Boneflap for prosthesis implant.
     
    skull, cranioplasty, boneflap, ct, scan, without, contrast, axial, craniotomy, frontal, temporal, petrous, ridge, occipital, foramen, magnum, paranasal, sinuses, .stl, 3d, model, printable, eyeball, orbit, ethmoid, sphenoid, hard, palate, pterygoid, process, mandible, maxilla, bone, angle, ramus, body, mastoid, apophysis, foramina, head, medulla, oblongata, temporomandibular, joint,

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  • File Reviews

  • File Comments

    • Valchanov,   I downloaded the file and took a look. I see right ventricular hypertrophy, a large VSD, pulmonary valve atresia/stenosis and an overriding aorta that is also on the right side. I think this is Tetrology of Fallot. It is a cool scan! Dr. Mike
    • Hello Can you give me some background information about the health condition of the patient? The set is excellent, but there is something really wrong with the anatomy of this heart. I want to model it properly.
    • The whole time I was thinking that I'm doing something wrong, because it's impossible for a TAAA to be that big. This was beyond everything I ever saw for 22 years of medical education and experience. But yes, it's THAT big. I segmented the lumen, I added 2 cm margin around it to create a hollow shell, then I added the media of the aneurysmic sack and all the atherosclerotic plaques for extra realism. There was a part of the sack, which went into one of the perihepatic space, but I removed it, b
    • I think this is the biggest thoracic aneurysm I have ever seen. I am glad the patient survived!
    • The cartilages of the larynx are one of my summer vacation projects. The raw data is from a CT scan and the nasopharynx can't be segmented properly. Eventually, I can segment the soft tissues as a bulk and the cavities as a separated mesh. 
  • Recent Forum Posts

    • Single versus multiple segmentation - Back and forth technique There are many challenging cases, in which the single segmentation is not enough. The paranasal sinuses and the congenital heart defects are notable examples. My usual workflow was to segment whatever I can as good as it's possible, to clean the unnecessary structures and the artefacts, to export the segmentation as stl 3d model and then to "CAD my way around".  This is solid philosophy for simple, uncomplicated models, but for complex structures with a lot of small details and requirement from the client for the highest quality possible, this is just not good enough, especially for a professional anatomist like myself. Then I started to exploit the simple fact, that you're actually able to export the model as stl, to model it with your CAD software and then to reimport it back and convert it into label map again. I called this "back and forth technique". You can model the finest details on your model and then you can continue the segmentation right where you need it, catching even the slightest details of the morphology of the targeted structure. This technique, combined with my expertise, gives me the ability to produce the best possible details on some of the most challenging cases, including nasal cavity, heart valves, brain models etc. etc. To use this technique, just import the stl file, convert it into a label map (for 3D slicer -  segmentation module/ export/import models and label maps).  The main advantages of this technique are: 1. You can combine the segmentation with the most advanced CAD functions of your favorite software. Two highly specialized programs are better than one "Jack of all trades" (cough cough Mimics cough cough) 2. Advanced artefact removing. 3. Advanced small detail segmentation and modelling. 4. Combined with several markers (separate segmentations, several voxels in size) on the nearby anthropometric points, this technique increases the accuracy of the final product significantly. Without points of origin, the geometry of your model will go to hell, if you're not especially careful (yes, I'm talking about the 3D brushes in Slicer). 5. You can easily compare the label map with the 3d model, converted back. Every deviation, produced during the CAD operations will be visible like a big, shining dot, which you can easily see and correct. This is one of the strongest quality control techniques. 6. You can create advanced masks with all the geometrical forms you can possibly imagine, which you can use for advanced detail segmentation. Those masks will be linked with the spatial coordinates of the targeted structures - the stl file preserves the exact coordinates of every voxel, which was segmented. 7. You can go back and forth multiple times, as many as you like. 8. This technique is more powerful than the best AI, developed by now. It combines the best from the digital technologies with the prowess of the human visual cortex (the best video card up to date). The main disadvantages are: 1. It's time consuming. 2. It produces A LOT of junk files. 3. Advanced expertise is needed for this technique. This is not some "prank modelling", but an actual morphological work. A specialized education and practical experience in the human anatomy, pathology and radiology will give you the best results, which this technique can offer.  4. You need highly developed visual cortex for this technique (dominant visual sense). This technique is not for the linguistic, spatial-motor, olphactory etc. types of brains. Recent studies confirms, that a part of the population have genetically determined bigger, more advanced visual cortex (The human connectome project, Prof. David Van Essen, Washington University in Saint Louis). Such individuals become really successful cinematographers, designers, photographers and medical imaging specialists. The same is true for all the other senses, but right now we're talking about visual modality and 3D intellect (I'm sorry, dear linguists, musicians, craftsmen and tasters). It's not a coincidence that I have so many visual artists in my family (which makes me the medical black sheep). But if you don't have this kind of brain, you can still use the technique for quality control and precise mask generation. Just let the treshould module or the AI to do the job for you in the coordinates, in which you want (You should really start using the Segment Editor module in Slicer 3D). 5. You really need to love your work, if you're using this technique. For the usual 3D modelling you don't need so many details in your model and to "CAD your way around" is enough for the task. 6. You should use only stl files. For some reason, the obj format can't preserve the spatial geometry as good as the stl format. Maybe because the stl is just a simple map of vertex coordinates and the obj contains much more sophisticated data. The simple, the better. On the picture - comparison of the semilunar valves, made by treshould segmentation at 250-450 Hounsfield units (in green) and modelled and reimported model (in red). 
    • If the models are for medical purposes - this is the webpage of the lab in my institution. You can check their equipment and find a similar service in your state. I'm also quite interested if anyone on this website is making such models.
    • You want those crowns for a medical purposes or as a prank? Because the quality criteria for the dentures are quite high - even 50 microns deviation can cause unbearable pain for the patient. Usually a special dental 3D scanner is used for the model generation and a SLA or STL printer - for the dentures themself, with an expensive, FDA-approved polymer. There are specialized dental 3d printing labs, including in my institution. I'm definitely out of this league (yet).
    • The heart is possible, but the valves will be a hard call, which depends on the skill of the radiologist and the 3D modeller.  You can segment the cuspids on hand and hope for the best. Smaller slices, better result. The print will be also a hard call, unless you have a Polyjet on hand.
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