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Extremity, Upper (Arm)

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Upper extremity: shoulder, arm, forearm, hand

184 files

  1. Free

    Healed clavicle fracture, 3D printable model

    This 3D printable STL file of a healed clavicle (collarbone) fracture was generated from real CT scan data and is thus anatomically accurate as it comes from a real person. It shows the healed fracture and residual deformity clearly. Download is free for registered members.
    This file was originally created by Dr. Bruno Gobbato, who has graciously given permission to share it here on Embodi3D. Modifications were made by Dr. Mike to make it suitable for 3D printing.
    The file(s) are distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license. It can't be used for commercial purposes. If you would like to use it for commercial purposes, please contact the authors.
    Technical specs:
    File format: STL
    Manifold mesh: Yes
    Minimum wall thickness: 1 mm
    Triangles: 287940

    31 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    0 comments

    Submitted

  2. Free

    3D printable wrist

    This 3D printable STL file of the wrist was generated from real CT scan data and is thus anatomically accurate as it comes from a real person. It shows the individual wrist bones in detail. Download is free for registered members.
    This file was originally created by Dr. Bruno Gobbato, who has graciously given permission to share it here on Embodi3D. Modifications were made by Dr. Mike to make it suitable for 3D printing.
    The file(s) are distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license. It can't be used for commercial purposes. If you would like to use it for commercial purposes, please contact the authors.
    Technical specs:
    File format: STL
    Manifold mesh: Yes
    Minimum wall thickness: 1 mm
    Triangles: 143418

    75 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    0 comments

    Submitted

  3. Free

    Distal clavicle fracture

    This 3D printable STL file of a fracture of the distal clavicle was generated from real CT scan data and is thus anatomically accurate as it comes from a real person. It shows the comminuted distal fracture. Download is free for registered members.
    This file was originally created by Dr. Bruno Gobbato, who has graciously given permission to share it here on Embodi3D. Modifications were made by Dr. Mike to make it suitable for 3D printing.
    The file(s) are distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license. It can't be used for commercial purposes. If you would like to use it for commercial purposes, please contact the authors.
    Technical specs:
    File format: STL
    Manifold mesh: Yes
    Minimum wall thickness: 1 mm
    Triangles: 272052

    25 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    0 comments

    Submitted

  4. Free

    Elbow joint

    This elbow joint was generated from real CT scan data and is thus anatomically accurate as it comes from a real person. It shows the distal humerus, the olecranon as it sits in the olecranon fossa, the two humeral epicondyles, and the distal radius and radial head. There are full size and double size files available. The enlarged double size file shows anatomy in terrific detail.
    This file was originally created by Dr. Bruno Gobbato, who has graciously given permission to share it here on Embodi3D. Modifications were made by Dr. Mike to make it suitable for 3D printing.

    The file(s) are distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license. It can't be used for commercial purposes. If you would like to use it for commercial purposes, please contact the authors.
    Technical specs:
    File format: STL
    Manifold mesh: Yes
    Minimum wall thickness: 1 mm
    Triangles: 57476

    74 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    0 comments

    Updated

  5. Free

    Shoulder joint

    This shoulder joint was generated from real CT scan data and is thus anatomically accurate as it comes from a real person. It shows the scapula, proximal humerus, the glenoid fossa, and detail anatomy of the glenohumeral (shoulder) joint. There are full size and double size files available. The enlarged double size file shows anatomy in terrific detail.
    This file was originally created by Dr. Bruno Gobbato, who has graciously given permission to share it here on Embodi3D. Modifications were made by Dr. Mike to make it suitable for 3D printing.
    The file(s) are distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license. It can't be used for commercial purposes. If you would like to use it for commercial purposes, please contact the authors.
    Technical specs:
    File format: STL
    Manifold mesh: Yes
    Minimum wall thickness: 1 mm
    Triangles: 316648

    90 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    0 comments

    Submitted

  6. Free

    Humerus

    This left humerus bone was generated from real CT scan data and is thus anatomically accurate as it comes from a real person. It shows the detailed contours of the humeral head and shaft. The olecranon of the ulna is shown within the olecranon fossa. The two epicondyles are present. The head of the radius has been removed to reveal anatomy of the elbow joint.
    This file was originally created by Dr. Bruno Gobbato, who has graciously given permission to share it here on Embodi3D. Modifications were made by Dr. Mike to make it suitable for 3D printing.
    The file(s) are distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license. It can't be used for commercial purposes. If you would like to use it for commercial purposes, please contact the authors.
    Technical specs:
    File format: STL
    Manifold mesh: Yes
    Minimum wall thickness: 1 mm
    Triangles: 109512

    173 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    0 comments

    Submitted

  7. Free

    Left Scapula and Humerus

    This shoulder and humerus was generated from real CT scan data and is thus anatomically accurate as it comes from a real person. It shows the left scapula, humerus, proximal radius and ulna bones, and the shoulder and elbow joints. The humerus has been joined to the scapula at the glenohumeral joint to form one solid piece.
    This file was originally created by Dr. Bruno Gobbato, who has graciously given permission to share it here on Embodi3D. Modifications were made by Dr. Mike to make it suitable for 3D printing.
    The file(s) are distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license. It can't be used for commercial purposes. If you would like to use it for commercial purposes, please contact the authors.
    Technical specs:
    File format: STL
    Manifold mesh: Yes
    Minimum wall thickness: 1 mm
    Triangles: 125370

    169 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    1 comment

    Updated

  8. Free

    Arm - humerus

    Arm - humerus, upper, bone, 3dmodel, stl, model, print, stl

    25 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    0 comments

    Updated

  9. Free

    Scapula

    This anatomically accurate scapula was derived from a model by Bror (http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:34004). The only change was to split the model into two pieces for easier printing.
    The model may be useful for medical education and shows the scapular surfaces, acromion and corocoid process. The file is in STL format and compressed with ZIP.
    Thank you to Dr Mike for the excellent renders.
    Printed on a Makerbot Replicator 1.
    Find us at www.healthphysics.com.au

    45 downloads

       (1 review)

    0 comments

    Updated

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    • It's amazing to see that i had the same problem and question. I usually avoid the Contact Z distance. Anyways, I got information from several places regarding any problem in 3d printing.
    • First of all, a lot of people in the "professional world" are using Ultimakers. And the Palette 2 is still not working with 2.85 filaments (and probably never will?)   The last few months I came across a new scenario for multi material printing. It is mixing PLA with PETG for supports. PLA and PETG don't bond to each other. So you can print your part with PLA and supports with PETG (or vice versa) and set the contact z distance to 0(!). It works very well. Supports are coming off easy and the interface layers look as good as if you were using soluble supports. Since you have to keep soluble filament in dry conditions it is much easier (and cheaper) to use PETG instead.    Setting up the Palette is very easy. Mosaic has some videos one can watch like this one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uqbMw_M07GM (and the two follow up ones).   As for my experience. The combination Prusa MK3 + Palette 2 is probably one of the most used one in the community and works very reliable (of course there is no 100% guarantee but lets say 98,5% of the time 😉) . And I always use and recommend Prusas.    Also I would recommend using this post processing tool for PrusaSlicer 2.0: https://github.com/tomvandeneede/p2pp for an Prusa+Palette combination.    I would also still strongly recommend the already mentioned DIY canvas hub guide. There is already an Octoprint beta version out for the new Raspberry 4 so chances are the guide might work with the new Raspberry 4. But I haven't tested it.
    • Thank you, Dr Mike I'll look into that.
    • Flaviu,    Can you go into more detail with your Palette 2 experience? The concept looked great in theory when it came out, but at the time I heard it was still problematic. Are you finding success now?
    • If you are only interested in bone, the lower dose is probably fine. Make sure you get sequences with soft tissue reconstruction algorithm in addition to the standard bone algorithm. Edge enhancement with the bone algorithm causes speckling, which can make bone segmentation more difficult. See my blog article on selecting a good scan for 3D printing below for details. Look at the section on reconstruction kernel.    
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