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UCLan Developed Personal Medication Using 3D Printing

blog-0227536001414867127.jpg3D printing is now very useful in the field of medical science as many medical researchers are tapping the use of 3D printing technology to streamline different medical procedures. The researchers from the School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Science from the University of Central Lancashire developed 3D printer filament that consists of various drugs.

Called the drug polymer filament, this small pill is used in place of conventional thermoplastic filaments like ABS and PLA. The researchers have made this filament using the MakerBot Replicator 3D printer. This means that it will also be possible for those at home to print their own tablet medications and pills.

The purpose of this invention is to make it easier for patients to take their medication. Imagine waking up and hitting a button on the computer and after a few minutes, the printer is able to “print” the exact daily dosage of drugs that you need to take? With this invention, it will be more difficult for patients to forget about taking their pills.

According to the researchers particularly the main proponent, Dr. Mohammed Albed Alhnan of the UCLan, this technology will also be useful among pharmaceutical companies. Since they can create customized medicine for each patient that they cater. Unfortunately, this invention will not be available until 2019 as scientists perceive that there are several regulatory obstacles that need to be addressed regarding the exact dosage and size of the pills. Nevertheless, this innovation is something that the pharmaceutical industry should be excited about.



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This is a wild idea. Drug eluting stents were a huge advance in the field of cardiology. I use doxorubicin drug-eluting beads to treat liver cancer. Imagine if we could easily make any type of drug-eluting device easily with a 3D printer. There is huge potential for medical devices.

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