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Create a 3D Hand Model and Other Models with STL Files

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Angel Sosa

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Create a 3D Hand Model and Other Models with STL Files

Anatomically speaking, the bones found within the upper limbs help us to perform incredible feats, such as holding and grasping objects. While we may not see these types of tasks as anything extraordinary, it does take five bone and muscle regions (shoulder, axilla, arm, forearm, and hand) to help us complete all the things we do with our hands and arms, such as swing a bat, write a letter, create a painting, and others too numerous to list.

 

For all the reasons we've just mentioned, embodi3D® is proud to introduce some of our favorite uploads, including a 3D hand model, upper limbs, wrists, shoulders, and other 3D printer-ready models that have been shared with the embodi3D® community. While these CT-converted STL files have been used in pre-operative planning and for purposes of education, these uploads will appeal to anyone with an interest in the human form. 

 

https://www.embodi3d.com/files/file/13001-human-hand-stl-file-processed/

 

An article in the International Journal of the Care of the Injured (Injury) revealed how 3D-printed models give orthopedic surgeons tactile and visual experience. As a sensory and reference tool, these models helped them to better understand a patient's unique anatomy and pathology prior to orthopedic surgery. 3D-printed models converted from 2D and 3D CT scans have made fracture line comminution diagnoses more accurate. Patients that can experience a scan on a three-dimensional scale are better equipped mentally to understand the pathology and the surgical procedure necessary to its correction. 

 

To download and create 3D-printed models from STL files and CT scans, be sure to register with embodi3D® today!

 

1. A Highly Detailed Hand 3D Model in STL Format

User Phil H uploaded this incredibly detailed anatomically correct hand 3D model to help visualize the hand bones, including the carpus, and metatarsal. The human hand has 27 distinct bones, which allow us to complete a range of tasks. Amazingly, the number of bones in the hand can vary from person to person due to the presence of sesamoid bones, which are essentially bones that are embedded within a muscle or tendon, as is the case with hands. Download this model and create your anatomical hand model! 

 

2. A 3D-Printed Model of an Elbow Joint (Converted from CT Scan)

 The elbow is one of the largest joints in the body. In conjunction with the shoulder joint and wrist, the elbow gives the arm much of its versatility, as well as structure and durability. This elbow joint was generated from real CT scan data and is thus anatomically accurate as it comes from a real person. It shows the distal humerus, the olecranon as it sits in the olecranon fossa, the two humeral epicondyles, and the distal radius and radial head. There are full size and double size files available. The enlarged double size file shows anatomy in terrific detail.

 

 

3. Detailed 3D Model of Hand and Wrist Bones in STL

An embodi3D® user going by "than" uploaded this detailed 3D model featuring the hand and wrist bones. Even the joint surfaces are shown in remarkable detail.

 

 

4. 3D Rendering from CT Scan of a Shoulder Joint with Multiple Epiphyseal Dysplasia

This 3D model created on embodi3D® features a shoulder with epiphysis dysplasia. The imaging findings include the following Minor epiphyseal involvement, severe involvement (hatchet head group) ,malformed humeral head; broad metaphysis; bowing of the proximal shaft; hypoplasia of the glenoid. If this topic interests you, you may find Matt Johnson's write-up on how 3D printing is being used in cancer screens highly interesting. 3D printing has also been called the "new frontier in oncology research" by The World Journal of Clinic Oncology.

 

 

5. 3D Model of Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Spindle Cell Sarcoma

This 3D model represents a case of undifferentiated pleomorphic spindle cell sarcoma implicating the right parascapular region of a 61 years old male. The patient represented with lung metastasis and was treated by surgical excision follower by chemotherapy as well as radiotherapy.

A cross sectional CT image is attached showing the lesion in axial, coronal and sagittal planes. Unfortunately pleomorphic undifferentiated sarcoma has an aggressive biological behaviour and a poor prognosis. Pleomorphic undifferentiated sarcomas can occur almost anywhere in the body, they have a predilection for the retroperitoneum and proximal extremities. They are usually confined to the soft tissues, but occasionally may arise in or from bone.

 

 

6. An Amazing 3D-Printable Model of a Hand

 An awesome 3D model of the hand´s bones with carpus and metatarsal detailed.

 

 

7. Shoulder and Humerus 3D Model Converted from CT Scan

 This shoulder and humerus was generated from real CT scan data and is thus anatomically accurate as it comes from a real person. It shows the left scapula, humerus, proximal radius and ulna bones, and the shoulder and elbow joints. The humerus has been joined to the scapula at the glenohumeral joint to form one solid piece.

 

 

8. A Wrist Fracture Shown in Stunning 3D Detail

A great 3D model showing a wrist´s fracture.

 

9. STL File Showing a Three-Dimensional Model of a Hand and Fingers

In this terrific 3D model, the skin surfaces of the hand, fingers, and nails are shown. This is a great demonstration of how the different tissue filters on embodi3D® can creating stunningly realistic renderings.

 

10. 3D Imaging Tendons of the Hands and Wrists

 Tendons are fibrous cords, similar to a rope, and are made of collagen.  They have blood vessels and cells to maintain tendon health and repair injured tendon. Tendons are attached to muscles and to bone. As the muscle contracts it pulls on the tendon and the tendon moves the bone to which it is attached as well as any joints it crosses. Our growing library of 3D anatomical models also features muscles and tendons of the lower extremities.  

 

FCR TENDON

The flexor carpi radialis tendon is one of two tendons that bend the wrist.  Its muscle belly is in the forearm and then travels along the inside of the forearm and crosses the wrist. It attaches to the base of the second and third hand bones.  It also attaches to the one of the wrist bones, the trapezium.

FCU TENDON

The flexor carpi ulnaris tendon is one of two tendons that bend the wrist.  Its muscle belly is in the forearm. The tendon travels along the inside of the forearm on the side of the small finger and crosses the wrist.  It attaches to the wrist bone, the pisiform, and as well as the 5th hand bone. 

 

ECRB TENDON

The extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon is one of 3 tendons, including ECRL and ECU, which act together to bend back the wrist. Its muscle belly is in the forearm and then travels to the thumb side of the wrist on the back part of the forearm. Along with the ECRL, it attaches to the base of the hand bones. It is shorter and thicker than the ECRL

 

ECRL TENDON

The extensor carpi radialis longus tendon acts along with the ECRB and ECU to bend back the wrist.  ECRL and ECRB also help bend the wrist in the direction of the thumb. Its muscle belly is in the forearm.  It is thinner and longer than ECRB.  It travels along the back aspect of the forearm and attaches to the base of the hand bones. 

ECU TENDON

The extensor carpi ulnaris tendon works along with the ECRL and ECRB to straighten the wrist.  It differs from these other two tendons in that it moves the wrist in the direction of the pinky.  Its muscle belly is in the forearm.  The tendon travels along the back forearm, through a groove in the ulna, and attaches to the base of the hand bones.

 

 

 

References

 

1. Osagie, L., Shaunak, S., Murtaza, A., Cerovac, S., & Umarji, S. (2017). Advances in 3D Modeling: Preoperative Templating for Revision Wrist Surgery. HAND, 12(5), NP68-NP72.

 

2. Handcare.org > Anatomy > Tendons . (2018). Assh.org. Retrieved 3 June 2018, from http://www.assh.org/handcare/Anatomy/Tendons#Wrist

 

 

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