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Bioprinting cancer to aid medical research

Much of the press for medical 3D bioprinting has revolved around recreating parts of the human body for medical transplants, implants, and reconstructive surgery. We often find these stories easy to relate to, with visuals that help us understand the benefits of each bioprinting solution.   However, another important aspect of bioprinting that may not be as obvious is its potential contribution to early-stage disease research. This type of research occurs in the laboratory, and focuses on how

JJMonash

JJMonash

 

The accessibility of 3D printing and the 'maker' mindset driving medical care

Recently, the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) in conjunction with MakerNurse, John Sealy Hospital, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, unveiled the first MakerHealth facility. This space was created to inspire nurses to creatively solve problems they see every day caring for their patients, using a diverse range of crafting tools, from zip ties to 3D printers. The initiative recognizes that many nurses are already coming up with creative solutions to problems with pati

JJMonash

JJMonash

 

Move over cadavers, enter 3D printing for medical education

This week cdmalcolm posted a great article here at Embodi3d.com on how 3D-printed replicas of patient’s organs are helping surgeons plan for complicated operations. Today I'd like to supplement this topic by talking about the advances 3D printing can bring to medical education, specifically by recreating human models for students to study and dissect.   Currently, the golden standard for teaching medical students the anatomy (overall structure) of the human body involves dissecting and observi

JJMonash

JJMonash

 

New 3D printing technology creates living body parts

Scientists at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine in North Carolina, USA, have taken the next step towards printing living replacement parts for our bodies. In a study published in the February 15th edition of Nature Biotechnology, the scientists revealed the ITOP (Integrated Tissue-Organ Printer). This 3D printer, which has been in development for over 10 years, is able to form structured living tissue, including ears, bones and muscles, which look and function like the real thi

JJMonash

JJMonash

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